Sunday Gazette-Mail from Charleston, West Virginia on August 24, 1975 · Page 44
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August 24, 1975

Sunday Gazette-Mail from Charleston, West Virginia · Page 44

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Sunday, August 24, 1975
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Augusi24,1975 SMJ , --CfevtMMd *«*» vifgiai* Tennis Has Become Billion Dollar Industry By Pnuy Gipte J975 JV. *. Tim«f .\«e» Swric* NORTH CONWAY. N.H. - Tennis is now big business. There was a time, not too long ago. when tennis was regarded as just a social sport, the privilege of the monied class. Now. it has become a billion-dollar industry, with an expansion potential still impressive, the experts say. "To say that tennis is enjoying a boom is to engage in an understatement," says Carl Wangman. executive secretary of the United States Tennis Courts and Track Builders Assn.. based in Chicago. New courts are being constructed at the rate of 8.000 a year. "Tennis has taken off for the stars," said Alfred S. Alschuler Jr., an architect and tennis consultant who is widely regarded as the "father of tennis statistics." According to Alschuler, the tennis industry grossed about $1.25 billion last year, crossing the billion dollar mark for the first time. Three years ago. revenues were estimated to be about $450 million. * * * OTHERS TOSS around figures anywhere up to $2 billion-plus For the industry. which is consiuered to comprise anything from sales of racquet and tennis balls to the increasingly rich purses offered in various international tournaments. Whatever the precise figure, there is general agreement in the tennis industry about the following: »· There are perhaps 35 million tennis players in the country, with player defined as one who is on the court several times a month, triple or more the total of 1970. »· Despite the national economic downswing, all indicators of the tennis industry have pointed upward, with the growth rate having been between 20 per cent and 40 per cent a year for the last three years. Racquets-manufacturing has been a growth standout, while several concerns that build tennis courts report that their business has doubled each year for the last three years. *· The game has spawned a whole new network of businesses such as tennis camps; vacation package tours; teaching and practice aids, and even housing complexes such as the Lakeway World of Tennis in Austin, Tex., where the game is the main drawing card. * » * PERHAPS inevitably, tennis has now become a significant part of mass culture in America. There are now more than 200 hours of live and taped television coverage of tournaments on national networks and educational channels, with sponsors paying up to $50.000 a minute for commercials. Producers of tennis equipment such as the Wilson Sporting Goods Co., of North Brook, 111., are among the sponsors, but 50 are liquor manufacturers, insurance companies such as the Aetna Life and Casualty Company, and American Airlines. Some of these sponsors also have begun hosting their own tournaments. Altogether, the purses available to professional players on the international tennis court -- including World Champions- ship Tennis, the Commercial Union Grand Prix and the United States Tennis Association's Slims Circuit -- will exceed $10 million this year. In 1968, the year that professional tennis began to take off, the over-all purse was barely $500,000. * » · ACCORDING to John Sienold, vice president for sales and marketing at the Billmore Hotel in Phoenix, Ariz., tennis is now replacing golf as the "businessman's sport." Sienold said the hotel finds that sometimes even its 10 tennis courts are not sufficient to meet demand. The court shortage is nationwide, according to Eve Kraft, director of the education and research center of the United States Tennis Assn., in Princeton. N.J. "There has been a quantum jump in the number of players in the nation and the number of available courts, both indoors and outdoors, just hasn't kept pace," Mrs. Kraft said. No one really even knows how many tennis courts there are in the country today, but estimates by Industry associations range from ttl.We to 154.MI. Jack Aldworth, executive director of the Indoor Tennis Association in Chicago, said that it was his guess that there were about 900 indoor tennis clubs in the country, although other estimates have put the figure at 1,200. * * » "THERE'S NO question that those in the court construction business have backup orders that will keep them busy for years and years," said Frank Magliato, vice-president of the Royal Athletic Surfacing Co. in Westbury, N.Y., the nation's largest installer of tennis courts. Magliato said that about eight years age, when his concern started up. it installed about 10 to 20 tennis courts a year. Last year, it put in 400 new courts. This year, he said, the company will install about 600 new courts. Depending on what surface was selected -- the most popular these days is called Elastatwf, a durable synthetic composed of rubber -- a new tennis court costs anywhere between $11,0* and $25,110 Magliato said. But it has been the indoor facilities that have felt the building lag most, according to Aldworth, chiefly because of the real estate industry's slowdown during the national economic downswing of the past year or so. Last year, according to Aldworth, it cost an indoor club about $95,000 per court in new installation and related expenses. In 1973, the same court had cost about $86,200, This year, he said, the costs are "likely to be way up." He estimated that a club had to have at least 120 members per court in order to break even. * 4 * BECAUSE MUNICIPAL tennis facilities around the country are generally inadequate for enthusiasts -- for example, it is almost impossible to get to play on the crowded public courts in New York City -- both the Department of Interior and ihe Department of Health, Education and Welfare are making funds available to local communities for construction of tennis courts, as are several state governments. One problem that indoor courts reportedly have is the high rate of obsolescence as innovations are made in court surfaces and lighting. But obsolescence is not something that concerns manufacturers of tennis balls and equipment. For example, the General Tire Rubber Co., one of three American companies that make tennis balls, doubled its capacity by opening a new plant in Jonesboro, Ark., about two years ago, then doubled production again by expanding its main facility in Jeannette, Pa. Now it is opening another factory in Ireland. Other manufacturers, such as Uniroyal, Inc., which makes Pro-Ked sneakers and the Bancroft Sporting Goods Co. as well as the Wilson Sporting Goods Co., which make racquets and other equipment, are offering special bonuses to workers to help keep up with a long list of orders. Now, anyone for. Paddleball? U.S. OPEN Pipestem Field Is Full Grass and Billie Jean Are Out; Matches Under Lights Are In Kanawha Valley golfers Dr. Jack [Shamblin, Bob Johnson and Harold ;Payne - who finished 1. 2 and 3 last -year -- will head another strong field :for the Pipestem Invitational Sept. 5-7. · The field is now full with 128 men from eight states: West Virginia, Virginia. Ken-., tucky. Ohio. Florida. Georgia. Michigan Shamblin Shreves and Tennessee. "We have 28 players wilh handicaps of four or less," said John Faulconer of Hinlon. Low handicap players from Ihe Kanawha Valley include Dr. SHamblin, Johnson, Payne, Bob Thaxlon, Kenny Bowen, Dick Foulche, Don "Moon" Mullins, Noble Roll. Harold Harris, J. G. Anderson and Tom Mollencop."There are many more higher handicappers enlered from Ihe Charleston area," Faulconer noled. Dr. Shamblin, Ihe South Charleston dentist will be shooting for his Ihird straight Pipeslem Invilational title. He won last year wilh a Ihree-round tolal of 218. Johnson was Iwo strokes back at 220 and Payne was third al 221. Pipeslem Slale Park golf pro Bill Robertson and assistant Dennis Webb lied for fourlh place in the Tri-Slale PGA head and assislant pro best ball lournament at the Churchill Valley course in Pitlsburgh. They won $140. * * Open Assn. Goal Is Better Courses "The purpose of the West Virginia Open Assn. is to obtain better courses as sites for the State Open tournament," said Moundsville C o u n t r y Club pro Roy Shreves, the president of the West Virginia Professional Golfers Assn. chapter. Shreves explained the purpose of the W. Va. Open Assn. in response to Harold Harris' letter in our column last Sunday. Harris, a St. Albans resident, tried t enter the State Open at Canaan Valley Sept. 12-14. But his entry was refused because his club (Big Bend) did not belong to the Open Assn. "The money received from clubs joining in the Open Assn. will go to the courses hosting the tournament," Shreves said. "For instance, if we can offer a course $500 a day to have the Open, we should be able to obtain much better courses for the tournament. And we won't have to use entry fee money to pay for green fees. The entry fee money can be returned to the players in the form of prizes." Shreves also said that the pros' entry money and the amateurs' entry money is kept separate in the State Open. "The pros never play for amateurs' money," Shreves remarked. "The pros have their own prize fund out of their entry fees and the amateurs have the same." About 40 clubs--or approximately half of the courses in the state--have signed up for the West Virginia Open Assn., Shreves said. Kanawha Valley clubs which have joined include Berry Hills, Kanawha, Sleepy Hollow and Edgewood. The fees are $50 for 18-bole courses and $35 for nine-hole courses. By Karol Stonger NEW YORK (AP) - Ah, for the good old days, when tennis at Forest Hills meant grass, Billie Jean King and duels 'til sundown. No more. Out are the bare spots and bad bounces that players in the U.S. Open have complained about for years. In is a pebbly, synthetic surface that plays more like clay than grass. Out is Billie Jean, last year's champion and winner three times before. The "old lady of tennis" has finally hung up her sneakers. Out, too, is tennis only under the sun. Up went the lights around center courl where Ihere will be tennis for the first eight nights. Three Aussies Seeded Also gone is Australian dominance in the men's draw. Aging Ken Rosewall, blitzed by Jimmy Connors in last year's final, doesn'l want to be humiliated again. John Newcombe, another former winner, is sidelined by surgery. Of the 16 seeded players, only three are Aussies. But when the run at the purse of $309,430 begins Wednesday, there will be a lot of excitement and a little nostalgia. When Connors is good, he's unbeatable on any surface. Organizers are betting he will be good again. He is seeded No. 1. But with a few mild upsets along the way. Arthur Ashe could make the final a rematch of the Wimbledon windup where Ashe emerged king. Or Romania's Hie Nastase Jimmy Connors Seeded No. 1 could come to the fore for a meeting of the two most reknowned courl jeslers. Lot of Competition But that's Ihe final. There are 11 days in belween--and a lot of other competition for Connors. The 22-year-old lefthander who swept most titles in sight last year, opens against Geoff Masters of Australia. (Statistics include games ol Monday August. 18 except Toledo at Syracuse Aug. 16; Rochester at Syracuse Aug. 17, and Memphis al Richmond Aug. 16-17.) . * * * All-Masonic Tournament Is Sept. 21 The sixth annual Beni Kedem Shrine all- Masonic golf tournament will be at Meadowbrook Recreation Club Sunday. Sepl. 21. The tournament is for masons of all degrees and their friends. It is limited to the first 144 entries and will be a shotgun start at 8 a.m. A dinner and awarding of Iro- phies will be held at the Shrine Mosque at 2 p.m. Entry forms may be mailed to chairman Jim Howell. P.O. Box 2589 Charleston. 25329. Three West Virginians will .take part in the 75th U.S. Amateur Championship starting Tuesday at the Country Club of Virginia in Richmond. Va. The three, all from Huntington. are Bill Campbell. Jim Ward and young Bryan Beymer. Campbell won the U.S. Amateur in 1964. bealing Ed Tutwiler in the finals. Speaking of Campbell, there is a fine story about him in the Seplember issue of Golf Digest magazine. The slory is tkled "Bill Campbell: the Old Pro of the Amateurs" and is written by Dave Anderson of the New York Times. The slory concludes. "Bill Campbell comes through loud and clear as an example of what amateur golf is like at its best". Harold Payne of'South Charleslon finished seventh in the Eastern Amateur Tournament last weekend at Portsmouth. Va. Payne had rounds of 74. 71. 68 and 70 for a 283 total. Tm CharlMten ... Tidewater ... Richmond... Syracuse... . Pawtucket... Toledo Tm Rochester... Tidewater.. Toledo . Pawtucket.. Charleston . Richmond .. Syracuse.... TEAM pet ib 267 WS» ..'....260 3962 254 3992 249 3706 241 3798 236 4070 235 4012 223 3906 TEAM 2.8074-51 2.8275-50 2 9958-66 .. 3.3154-71 3.3249-77 3.344440 3.6454-66 3.7266-55 BATTING r h 2b 3b M110M 1(1 32 4841030 165 25 4861013 148 36 423 921 150 20 492 915 160 27 388 962 130 13 441 941 130 38 433 870 136 25 PITCHING eg i ho ip h 35 111059917 41 201052 898 31 111094 993 32 910581024 30 81078 993 36 121053 939 24 12 979 938 26 1110251034 hr rbl m»3 40 436 74 447 68396 40 435 56368 67 398 82 370 r tr 421 330 380 330 447 363 4B7 389 468 398 413 393 460 396 502 424 ib 133 58 . 56 56 32 53 66 91 hr 57 55 64 70 62 62 63 S9 Bannisler, Tol Fuller, Roc. ......... Dancy, Tol Aviles, Paw Sodcrholm, Ric... Rogodzinskl :..: Skaggs,"Rbc Frilt, Tol Koritko, Paw Scanlon, Mem Conigliaro, Paw.. Castle, Syr.: : Deidel, Syr Down, Mem. Cox, Tol Browne, Tol ..215 215 214 213 ...213' ...210 209 207 .. .206 :. .204 ...203 198 186 188 127 033 279 335 187 249 178 124 86 256 · 97 54 123 283 309 255 63 12 42 46 14 IB 11 9 2 29 15 7 11 26 26 22 4 1 60 72 40 53 38 26 18 53 20 11 25 56 58 48 8 1 6 7 4 6 9 4 7 7 2 1 2 12 10 .'3 1 1' 5 24 15 45 0 10 0 18 '0 8 2 14 0 10 12 37 3 5 3. 11 3 12 4 39 2 22 2 20 0 1 0 0 22 1 0- BATTING LEADERS INDIVIDUAL BATTING Giles Logical Choice In U.S. Amateur Golf By Marshall Johnson RICHMOND, Va. (AP) - Vinny Giles will be both a sentimental and a logical choice in the 75th United States Amateur Golf Tournament opening Tuesday, but the red-haired Richmonder disagrees. saying the young collegians "are naturally the favorites." "It's a r,ix-day tournament with 36 holes the last three days and it has to favor the younger players," says the 32- year-old Giles, who sees both advantages and disadvantages to the fact the tournament will be played over his home course. But Giles will be taking an impressive record this year into the match play affair that ends next Sunday over the 6.672-yard. par-70 James River course of the Country Club of Virginia. WOT Two Toinumexts Giles, who won the championship in 1972 at medal play, has been involved in just two major tournaments this year and won both, the British Amateur-"! was playing extremely well"-- and the Southern Amateur-- "I didn't play that well, but neither did the others." A victory here not only wonld make would only the fourth player eve* to win the British and American crowns--Lawson Little did it twice--in the same year. "I like playing at home," Giles admits. "Your life style doesn't change too much. The people are pulling for you a little more than if you were somewhere else, but it puts added pressure on you. But I don't mind the pressure." At the same time, Giles says "not playing any better than I am, I don't feel it's any big advantage." Campbell Former Former Champion With last year's winner, Alabama All- American Jerry Pate, having turned pro, the only former champion in the field of 200 besides Giles is veteran Bill Campbell of Huntington. W.Va., who won in 1964. Besides Giles, who finished second three straight limes, there are three previous runners-up--Downing Gray of Pensacola Fla.: Dale Morey of High Point, N.C.: and Bill Hyndman of Huntington Valley. Pa., who lost to Harvie Ward in 1955 over the James River course. Giles has drawn a bye in Tuesday's opening rand, when 72 matches will be played. He's in the fourth quarter of the draw with such players as Campbell Porter Cup champion Jay Sigel of N« Square, Pa. Nimt ava Childers, Mem 667 Bernhardt, Syr 344 Vail, Tid 342 Parker, Syr ...338 Mtndeu, Ch« 323 Andrew, paw 310 Slillman, Roc 307 Pemberton, Td 301 Valentine, Me..30l..42S Moore, Ric 300 Armis, Cha 300 Moreno, Cha 293 Peguero, Mem 286 Duncan, Roc 285 White, Mem 284 Yancy, Syr 283 Bailor, Roc 283 Asselslne, Ric 283 GOflUltZ, Oil 212 Edwards, Cha 282 Staiger, Tid 280 On, Chi 277 Reinbach, Roc 277 Boisclair. Tid 275 Merchant, Paw......275 Nolan. Ric 273 R. Hodges, Tid 272 Whiifield, Syr 272 Colctta, Paw 271 Ayala, Tid 268 Gallaghr, Ric 268 Cox, Mem 267 Martin, Tol 266 Tepedino, Ric 266 Macha, Cha 264 Sanders, Ric. 266 Diggle, Tid 264 R. Clark, Tol 261 Theodora Tid 261 Matchick. Roc. 261 Harlow, Roc 258 Velei. Syr 255 Hughes, Paw 255 J. Baker, Paw 255 Murrell. Ric. 255 Kleven Tid 254 Senn, Tid 254 Belloir. Ric 254 F. Andrews, Tol 251 Nahorodny, Tol 250 Srecden. Mem 250 Fiore. Roc...... 250 Sanicrine, Chi 251 WIcGrew, Tol 2*9 Geacn. Ric 2*9 Saniana. Tol 246 Vazquez. Paw 245 Johnsoa Mem 244 Garcia, Roc 244 Stearns, Syr 2*3 Flowsri. Paw 2*3 Dejohn. Tid 2*2 Momon, Mem 2*2 »b r 3 0 244 20 84 18 409 53 140 23 71 10 24 6 65 10 21 3 245 30 76 10 388 55 119 26 418 63 126 23 76129 27 3 404 53 121 16 420 6} 12* 21 400 62 11720 7 2 2 0 326 37 93 14 303 38 86 14 152 21 43 8 474 63 134 18 400 62 113 19 103 16 W * 78 7 22 2 410 44 115 27 3M 60 107 20 383 58 106 19 404 54 111 16 334 26 92 14 308 35 84 11 254 25 69 8 346 4Q 94 19 292 27 79 11 123 IB 33 11 205 23 55 6 439 39 117 24 278 52 74 12 214 19 57 14 429 56 114 17 364 48 97 14 284 47 75 12 295 27 257 38 218 27 384 57 204 51 372 27 h2b 3b hrrbl 2 0 0 0 0 1 4 42 9 7 79 0 0 15 0 0 5 2 1 16 2 2 11 5 4 2 1 3 5 77 11 67 3 57 8 99 9 5217 95 9 423 40 108 20 235 29 60 8 169 20 13 6 126 22 32 8 122 16 31 5 403 37 101 21 344 45 ?1 14 172 25 15* 29 1M 10 185 21 338 40 342 3* 241 25 787 29 43 39 31 Zebcr, Syr 239 Foster. Tid 239 Vuko»icH. Tol Z3S PiChardo, Syr 236 Hutto. Roc 234 Godby, Paw 234 Dine*", Sf 235 Cremartie, Mem 23S Nelicn. Paw. 23J Kenney, Syr 23* ocmtrCk* Jot Murphy. Ric 23 Ericison. Paw .277 H. Hun'er, Paw TO Br«azea!e, Ric 229 BtaH Ric 2« Navsrr'de M«tn~ .214 6 3 5 « 4 8420 84 10 » 6 70 7 352 30 86 10 226 31 55 10 420 49 102 14 339 n 82 12 38 54 1M t 297 2 259 33 '2 4 301 50 2H 38 331 31 310 49 341 30 (91 31 2 3 2» 45 tt 57 158 16 97 11 !« 13 20? 22 17» 23 m ii ·m 27 94 14 17 2 71 12 62 5 10 3 71 10 701* 78 73 40 W T 7 22 42 46 3» It 63 13 64 1 45 54 17 12 60 12 6t 8 50 0 -0 4 46 8 33 0 12 4 31 1 20 1 13 1 9 7 70 10 53 7 48 4 34 4 26 49 2 30 10 61 2 30 4 19 1 15 8 55 12 30 1 18 13 51 14 72 3 25 2 20 4 22 2 29 2 26 7 29 5 31 17 61 7 19 2 21 1 11 1 8 5 30 IB 55 9 28 * 31 2 31 4 21 · 3! 4 3* 5 25 4 31 3 31 1 2* 3 27 1 2 3 6 36 0 11 2 33 2 23 0 * 0 21 9 30 3 2S 0 26 3 28 1 3 0 17 i n S 25 2 13 2 23 7 1 II 1 20 tb 0 0 3 1 1 2 2 3 4 6 34 1 1 12 2 20 23 0 2 2 1 3 15 3 2 3 3 3 0 6 22 3 10 4 2 0 9 1 16 1 2 0 3 0 4 3 II 0 0 1 2 3 0 1 i S 5 3 H 1 8 5 2 11 1 11 1 3 8 2 0 0 Avge .342 Vail, Tidewater; Slug Pet. .494 Vail, Tidewa- Icr; AB 474 Bailor, Rochester; Runs 76 E Valentine, Memphis; Hits 140 Vail, Tidewater; Total Bases 202 Vail, Tidewater; Doubles 28 Armas, Charleston; Triples 9 Vail Tidewater; Homeruns 18 Nahorodny, Toledo; RBIs 79 Vail Tidewater; Walks 77 Monzon, Memphis; Slrikeouls 118 Fuller, Rochester; Stolen bases 45 Dilone, Charles- Ion. PITCHING LEADERS Earned Run Average 1.61 Monlague, Memphis; Wins 13 Swan, Tidewater and Sawyer, Syracuse; Losses 15 Kreuger, Pawtutket, Saves 13 Torrealba, Richmond; Games 61 M, Barr, Pawlucket; Complete games 13 Swan, Tidewater; shulouls 4 Sawyer, Syracuse and Simpson, Toledo; Innings pitched 175 1/3 Jones, Charleston; walks82 Jones, Charleston; Strikeouts 144.0. Jones, Charleslon. INDIVIDUAL PITCHING Name ira w-l iv Ip h r tr bb Myrick, T i d 0.00 0 - 0 0 2 2 0 0 1 - · - - " o-O 1 10 Also in his half of Ihe draw are the formidable Rod Laver. the No. 9 seed from Australia whom Connors beat in a highlytout- ed challenge match; No. 5 Bjorn Borg; No. 6 Tom Okker of The Netherlands; No. 13 Harold Solomon and No. 12 John Alexander of Australia. In the bottom half of the draw is Guiller- .mo Vilas, the ace from Argentina seeded No. 2; Spaniard Manuel Orantes, the No. 3 seed who won the Canadian Open last weekend; No. 7 Tony Roche, the only other Australian seeded; Nastase, No. 8; No. 10 Roscoe Tanner, who like Connors is a lefthander who can be tough; No. 15 Jan Kodes, No. 11 Raul Ramirez of Mexico and No. 14 Vitas Gerulaitis. . Stan Smith, who won the Open in 1969 and 1971 but is in a tailspin right now, isn't even seeded. Young Lionesses Nor is Rosemary Casals, twice a runner- up but never a winner. It was Rosie who, with tongue in cheek, so often pleaded with Ms. King to quit so she could be No. 1. But now there are young lionesses eager to make her their prey--top-seeded Chris Evert, Martina Navratilova of Czechoslovakia and Evonne Goolagong of Australia. Also threats are Virginia Wade of England, Olga Morazova of the Soviet Union, Francoise Durr of France afld Julie Heldman. In the "old-timers club" is Margaret Court of Australia, who has won seven U.S. crowns, her last in 1973. And, if they survive the preliminaries, a couple of other names from the past will come back to haunt--Ann Haydon Jones of Britain and Maria Bueno, a four-time winner from South of the Border. Smith Captures Table Tennis Title Left-handed Junior Smith won the weekly handicap table tennis tournament at the North Charleston Community Center over defensive ace Howard Hiserman, 21-8, 21-8. Smith's attacking game and two-point handicap advantage were too much for the veteran "chop" player in the fast moving finals. Smith had not lost a game in three · earlier matches, before meeting Hiserman. Hiserman had a harder way to the finals, defeating Joe Farley 23-21, 21-14, Bruce Sorgman 21-15,1.0-21, 21-12 and Dan Harker of Cross Lanes 21-18, 21-18. Monday's play will be the summer's last for the local table tennis group, with the regular Kanawha Valley Table Tennis League to start up in October, according to summer program director Bruce Sorgman. 2-0 3-0 3-4 10-3 13-7 1-4 13-9 11-8 11-4 7-4 8-6 4-3 8-2 9-7 5-3 6-2 1-0 1-0 1-2 9-5 5-6 6-3 0-2 Gardner, Syr 0.87 Minihall, Cha 1.40 Montague. Mem.... 1.61 Torrealaba, Ric. ...1.66 .Simpson, Tol 1.84 Beattie. Syr 1.98 Pagan, Syr 2.16 Contreras, Tid 2.18 Laxlon, Tid 2.22 Swan, Tid 2.40 Diorio, Mem 2.43 Sawyer, Syr 2.47 Willis, Roc 2.50 S. Barr, Paw 2.55 6-11 Jems, Cha.... 2.57 13-9 Atkinson, Mem 2.60 3-4 Holdsworth, Roc. ..2.62 3-8 Kiser, Tol 2.66 1-7 Lang, Mem 2.67 8-10 M.Barr, Paw 2.68 6-6 Flanagan, Roc 2.70 Espinosa, Tid 2.76 Galasso 2.79 Gebhard, Mem 2.82 Stein, Roc 2.87 Bernard, Tid 2.92 Albin, Mem 2.94 Pirlle, Syr 2.99 Stephenson, Ric...3.00 Sandate, Tol 3.00 Riley, Mem 3.00 Devine, Ric 3.02 Freeman, Roc 3.W Jirrnrwi, On 3JM Farias. Paw 3.05 Bair, Cha 3.07 i-ll Newhauser, Paw...3.13 *-6 Cram, Tid 3.20 7-1 Closler, Ric 3.20 2-* Lanfford, Oia 3.22 5-1 Kreuger, Paw 3.30 7-15 Wesener, Tid 3.33 *-l Mandrbcn, Tid.,3.39.M Oil* 112 51 Merlin, Oil --3.40 7-10 0 1141*6 Kirkpatrick, Mem. 3.41 10-7 Hernaiz, Tol 3.49 5-8 Hanna. Ric 3.59 10-9 demons, Paw 3.60 5-3 Thompson, Tol 3.63 1-4 Aass, Paw 3.44 7-11 Sterling, Tid 3.73 8-10 Mahlp, Ric 3.77 5-12 Kelley. Ric 3.77 1-4 Wright, Paw 3.7S 1-8 Ricks. Syr 3.19 8-5 ROSJ. Paw ZS9 2-4 Paul. Tol 4.00 3-3 Manz. Roc. *.C7 6-4 Kanvneyer, Syr....4.:i HO MMM,6l*. 4.12 2-1 S***nki, Oia_.4.1J (-11 0. Hi», Tol *.22 8-10 Keener, Mem ..OS 4-1 Lacorte. Ric 4.5* W J FiJKTO* RiC 5.43 6-10 0 Baocock. Roc 5.J7 M 0 Day, Syr *.« 2-« 4 OtttOlt, Syr. 6.79 1-4 1 K«v*Mfk,au....*JI W 1 Ptmbcrtxv Tid 9.00 M 0 I 3 1 10 7 I 57 30 5-6 I 112 90 9-9 13 11487 11-6 1 156118 0 13 10 5 16 18 1 5 3 4 8 1 109 73 2 165136 3 37 33 0 175134 V154130 0 130111 0 175120 5 100 87 0 9274 0 81 84 0 158120 3 10490 0 153139 2 114105 0 135114 4 6053 1 97 81 0 111 78 ! 79 87 7 8784 1 3332 1 15 14 3 24 16 0 123126 1 97 89 3 97101 0 20 18 0 152141 5 6960 3 45 40 2 7062 0 44 33 1 163173 1 78 72 1 1 6 11 9 32 27 20 22 29 21 41 49 32 43 5 3 8 4 4 6 18 13 34 28 27 46 48 44 38 17 10 14 53 48 47 62 43 48 52 37 66 61 50 82 34 29 32 33 27 34 32 24 32 55 47 63 36 31 34 55 46 49 39 35 35 48 42 75 21 19 19 38 31 49 40 36 66 33 26 19 37 29 33 20 11 18 5 5 4 9 8 18 48 43 45 53 33 69 IS 33 24 7 7 10 a 52 54 26 24 45 20 16 15 28 25 29 17 li 15 67 60 49 31 29 52 13 48 57 56 44 57 67 55 2* 41 37 39 63 S3 81 29 24 27 5 69 65 33 28 28 0 I641S4 75 67 73 1 156156 0 I 43 0 7 4 7 0 0 83 S3 0 132136 0 74 75 0 7279 5 4 2 4 7 0 131156 1 1» 26 I 12*111 0 121130 62 60 55 0 »93 IS 3? 18 0 10395 0 106131 1 12 17 0 7 9 0 3239 0 6313 1 2227 1 145164 6 95 99 0133113 2 60 56 79 65 17 69 60 59 38 31 33 41 35 37 67 57 64 44 32 23 35 32 15 19 19 13 69 60 34 It t I 72 S3 52 54 40 44 59 14 I 5 4 5 5 25 23 20 49 48 44 · 17 11 1 1 0 so · 3 2 52 6 1 91 101 11 17 36 98 111 21 96 73 94 144 68 84 60 87 51 122 65 62 39 51 46 26 71 13 12 13 67 82 50 18 102 71 23 13 23 106 41 47 64 53 96 35 39 110 52 105 52 52 86 32 52 16 42 S « 74 37 87 51 11 5 Ashe Is Tennis Player of Year BROOKLINE, Mass. (AP) - Wimbledon champion Arthur Ashe was named a runaway winner of the Association of Tennis Professionals' Player of the Year Award on Saturday. Jack Kramer, ATP executive director, said that Ashe was named on all but five ballots in the voting by the association's 175 members. Rod Laver Conducts Tennis Camps Rod Laver Building New Career (C) New Vorfc Times JVeun Service NORTH CONWAY, N.H. - Recognizing that his days of winning big money in len- nis tournaments are practically over. Rod Laver, the 37-year-old Australian slar. is busily building another career -- as a businessman. Less than Ihree years after the Laver- Emerson Tennis enterprise slarled. it is grossing $2.5 million a year. His parlner is Roy Emerson, another lennis slar from Auslralia. Their company conducts lennis camps around Ihe country, manages racquet clubs for businessmen and produces film strips for schools and educational documentaries for television: "I saw some time ago that, as my career in competitive tennis tapered off, I had to find alternate sources of revenue," Laver said over breakfast in this mountain resort where he was participating in the ¥100,000 Volvo international tournament. When he began his business career. Laver was already a millionaire. He had won nearly all the major championships of tennis and was the only man to have Iwice won the "grand slam" --the Auslralian Open, the French Open. Ihe United States Open and Wimbledon. * * * · LAYER'S NAME appears on dozens of tennis products he has endorsed, such as racquets, clothing and sneakers. He is managed by the Mark McCormack Agency of Cleveland. "Just about the time that I was winding down my tennis schedule, the tennis boom really began in this country," Laver said. "I realized that I had a name that was easily recognized in the tennis world and so I decided to provide a vitally needed service." This service was a series of tennis instructional camps. The first one opened at Bretton Woods, N.H. One-week Tennis holidays are offered. Either Laver or Emerson are present, and for the whole week. They soon hired Mike Narracott. a management expert from the McCormack agency, to supervise their business venture. The new concern, Laver-Emerson Tennis, established headquarters in Hous- · ton. and within a year there were three other tennis camps around the country -in Texas, California and South Carolina. Narracott estimates that Laver-Emerson Tennis's revenues this year will be al least $2.5 million. Guaranteed Income Plus Bonus Arrangements EXECUTIVE SALES We offer unlimited earning opportunity for individual with executive ability, good education and pleasing personality who enjoys meeting the public. Immediate Guaranteed Income, plus bonus. Excellent Sales Training program, Free Group Life, Major Medical and Retirement Plan. Person selected must be ambitious, intelligent, sales-minded. To set up personal interview . .. Call 744-6345

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