Sunday Gazette-Mail from Charleston, West Virginia on August 20, 1972 · Page 118
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August 20, 1972

Sunday Gazette-Mail from Charleston, West Virginia · Page 118

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Charleston, West Virginia
Issue Date:
Sunday, August 20, 1972
Page:
Page 118
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Page 118 article text (OCR)

nvmv. MYUTi "Fly now and pay later" is one of the best- advertised lures in the travel business, but very few Americans actually heed that advice. In a recent address before the White House Conference on the Industrial" World Ahead, Thomas W. Benham, president of Opinion Research Corp. of Princeton, N.J., noted the following facts about the U.S. public: 84 percent have not traveled by air during the last 12 months. 75 percent have never been outside the U.S. 52 percent have not been 200 miles away from home in the last 12 months. 50 percent don't use any credit cards. Sam Justice, writing in the "International Herald Tribune," tells about the judge in Salisbury, Rhodesia, who had never driven a car. Someone in his court wanted to know how the judge could rule on motor accidents without firsthand knowledge of driving. "It f s really no handicap," the magistrate explained. "I also try rape cases." Want to deposit your savings in a Swiss bank account? It will cost you 8 percent a year. In an effort to discourage dollars from entering Switzerland, the Swiss government two months ago ordered banks to charge their foreign customers 2 percent each quarter, to be deducted from all new deposits in advance. The Swiss contend that the dollars they purchase to support the unrealistic exchange rate established in Washington, B.C., last December are not convertible into gold, and that the inflow of such dollars spurs domestic inflation. any other country. According to Brig. Gen. Paul Albert Scherer, the new director of the Military Intelligence Service, there are an estimated 25,000 Communist spies in . "tar/-1.3 mg, ncam. Super King: 19 mg. -tar," 1.4 mg. nicotine av. per cigarette. FTC Report |Apr. 72). Big tension going up_ only hwtom coning down. And now you can retu with the fad-boded flavor only one cigarette deters. This...isthe L 8 M moment! RICH RICH EM Warning: The Surgeon General Has Determined That Cigarette Smoking Is Dangerous to Your Health. Europeans no longer prefer U.S. dollars. They want Swiss, German and French money. OTMIHf West Germany enjoys a dubious honor. It attracts more spies than West Germany. Most of them are East Germans with a sprinkling of Russians, Poles, and Czechs. Three-fourths of all espionage activity concerns itself with military security installations. Which daily publication has only 4000 paying subscribers, costs some $7 million to print annually, but has survived for a century? The answer is the Congressional Record, which will celebrate its 100th birthday next March. Subscribers pay $45 year to read the daily proceedings, roll-call votes, speeches, and favorite magazine and newspaper articles of both Houses of Congress. Most copies of the Record are received free. Senators are allowed up to 100 free subscriptions. Congressmen 68, and gratis copies go out to 1350 depository libraries. The cost of printing the Record runs to about $163 per page. This includes the salaries of the 16 shorthand reporters who work in 10-minute shifts to record what is being said on the floors of the Senate and the House. Within 30 minutes after making a speech, a Congressman receives a typed copy which he may revise before the Record goes to publication. Many speeches which are included in the Record were never actually delivered on the floor. "These 'phantom speeches,'" explains a Washington watcher, "have been accepted in the House over the past century because there are, to be frank, too many Congressmen." Congress would never adjourn if all of the speeches prepared were delivered. Who foots the bill for the expensive Congressional Record? The taxpayer, of course.

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