Sunday Gazette-Mail from Charleston, West Virginia on August 10, 1975 · Page 11
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August 10, 1975

Sunday Gazette-Mail from Charleston, West Virginia · Page 11

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Charleston, West Virginia
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Sunday, August 10, 1975
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Page 11
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11 A-- August 10,1975 Sui One Year Later: Ford Vows He Won't Be Pushed to Right From Page One ·· After Mrs. Ford underwent breast cancer surgexy last fall, there was recurrent speculation Ford might not seek election next year because of her health. That speculation largely ended when he announced his candidacy. . "I talked with her about it and we came to the conclusion, one, that her health was sufficiently good that she could be a good teammate in the operation, and I think that judgment has been borne out." The President said that "we don't foresee any health problems as far as she is concerned, except that she shouldn't try to keep up with the schedule that I keep up with sometimes." When a reporter persisted in asking whether the situation might change if Mrs. Ford's health deteriorates, Ford said: "We don't speculate on those things." If Ford vetoes a six-month extension of oil price controls, petroleum prices presumably would be free to rise sharply to world market levels as of Sept. 1. K HOWEVER, FORD SAID he is now studying a series of administrative actions and legislative proposals that would dampen any inflationary impact. Asked to be more specific, the President said: "You watch. We will handle it with skill and success." At another point, Ford said, "I think there probably will be a minimum increase in gasoline prices." And he said he also expected that boosts in grain prices attributed to-major sales to the Soviet Union would have "a minimal impact on bread." The President said any higher price tags That Old House Looks the Same ALEXANDRIA, Va. (AP) -'They live on Pennsylvania Avenue now. But the old neighborhood remains the same. The unpretentious brick house at 514 Crownview Drive looks no worse for wear since the landlord moved across the Potomac River to run the nation. But one year ago, the quiet street resembled a movie lot with the "action"' signal up. Reporters and cameras followed every twitch of the window curtains. Secret Service followed every twitch of reporters. The vice president, in pajamas and a bathrobe, scooped up the morning paper from the front porch - and muffed it. Part of the paper slipped and fell on the porch. Just hours later, Ford took the oath as President of the United States. *· SUSAN FORD COMES BACK to visit. The last time she brought former neighbor Louise Abbruzzese a ticket to her high school graduation. "A few sightseers come by, but not many," Mrs. Abbruzzese said. "They seem to know which is the Ford house. But once in a while somebody will ask." It's right across the street from the Abbruzzeses, two doors down from the blazing red crepe myrtle tree. A quiet, working family with three boys lives there now. They keep their phone unlisted - to keep out bothesome calls from those who might be curious about the house. The Gerald R. Ford name is also gone from the Virginia telephone book. But the switchboard number 202-456-1414 is listed under White House in the D.C. white pages. "Everything, the paint and the wallpaper, is the same inside as when the Fords left," said the Alexandria realtor who handles the rental. The Fords keep the old house, thinking someday they may want to return. There's an old blue Volkswagen truck parked in the driveway where Steve Ford's snazzy yellow jeep sat before it got in the way of security cars. for gasoline "are not going to force a broad over-all increase in the rate of inflation." Ford declined to discuss in any substantive way efforts to achieve a new Israeli- Egyptian agreement in the Middle East. He was asked if a settlement might involve the use of American personnel to monitor any agreement and if American voters might want to know about it in advance. "I will certainly be frank and honest with the American people as to any involvement in the negotiating process or any subsequent involvement," he said. Discussing his own health, Ford said: "In all honesty, I have never felt better than I feel today for a long, long period of time." He said his weight is down and his muscle tone up. . Reminded that some critics suggest he keeps too busy a schedule to find time for thinking, the President said: "I make the time ... Fortunately, my health is such that I can get five hours, sleep a night and feel good." Ford said he decided last fall he would declare his intentions to run for election because being a lame-duck president "would have seriously undercut my ability to be a president." Secondly, he said he felt he could, both domestically and internationally, "build a record which would be in the best interests (A tfce eowtty." » THE CHIEF EXECUTIVE acknowledged that public opuw» polks indicate that government generally--"and I think that would probably incUsde the top people in the executive branch"-- is met with stispkion and lack of confidence. But he expressed confidence that he will preside over an economic improvement at home and a bettering of the world situation that will give "an impetus to the restoration of public confidence at least in the federaal government." Ford also pictured himself as having personality traits that should put him in good stead as a campaigner. "I feel that the American people as a whole are very open and basically very honest, very friendly and gregarious," he said."It seems to me ... they rather approve as a president who has those somewhat similar characteristics. They feel a certain rapport with someone that they feel has the eteajraeterisiks that ifcey have." At the outset, Ford said of his first year in office: A The first several months were the most difficult" But he said problems have been met and overcome along the way and that aow he has mare (fsxxruawy to iotas oa Jofiger-raage diflieuilies. Of the preskteacy, he said. "I thick li has gotten progressively easier to handle even though the problems have been tough." ^^·^^^^······^····MM What can you do when you want extra money? Let H R Block teach you to prepare income tax returns. We teach income tax preparation to people who have a flair for dealing accurately with figures, and who enjoy working with the public, and who would like to earn extra income in their spare time. Over 300.000 students have graduated from our Income Tax Course. We teach classes in more than 2.000 communities throughout the country. There is almost certain to be a class location and time satisfactory to you. Job interviews available for best students. Send for free information and class schedules today. HURRY! Classes start: SEPTEMBER 10 There are 7 convenient class locations Contact the 4410MncCORKLEAVE.,S.W. SOUTH CHARLESTON, W. VA. 25309 office nearest you: PHONE 768-2902 Please send me free information about your tax preparation course. I understand there is no obligation. Name --·'- -Address----. City . . State Phone-- CLIP AND MAIL TODAY · · J Officer Candidates Rise I While Economy Slips ? .. ; . . . . . ' * * . ; . ; '·{(·';·-".-' \-.'. -· " - , *''" · "^ 1 i NEW YORK-Michaei Spencer wants to '"get a masters degree in business administration. He's joined the Navy. Kevin Smith i wants more responsibility than his job "with Master Charge offered, so he's joined i? the Marines. Patti Willis is getting a masters in.library science this summer.,Then ; she's joining the Navy.. * The military services have.been 5 swamped recently with applications for I their officer corps from unemployed or ·t underemployed recent college graduates: I Many other students are looking for a few I years of experience before going to gradu- j; ate school. * « i{ THE VOLUME of applications is so i heavy, in fact,- that there are three for ev- sery place in the Navy's officer candidate laclass and the Marine Corps has had to "make the qualifications test for potential £ officers more difficult because "scores have been going sky-high," a spokesman The Army is no longer accepting civilian I said. '»,.. Ford Visits ji ^Refugee 1 Gamp Today ' FT. CHAFFEE, Ark. (AP)-The Army 5 says President Ford's visit to this refugee relocation camp today will be "very con- ·'trolled," and the more than 20,000 refu- 't gees won't have direct access to the Presi- v dent. ; Capt. Frank Cannavo said Ford will '' have access to the refugees if he wants, * but they they won't be able to press around * Ford or talk to him unless Ford makes an ** effort to talk with them. * The visit here is Ford's first to any of ''the four relocation centers opened after 'South Vietnam and Cambodia fell last ^ spring. * Cannavo said Ford's schedule calls for * the President to drive through the reloca- l lion center, then walk through one of the j bar racks and the nearby area. * For security reasons, Cannavo said, ' there will be a wide area between the . · '. President and the refugees. : : Residents of the area surrounding the .relocation center won't be allowed in "· : Chaffee while Ford is there. · '· Army officials have asked area resi- J dents wishing to see the President to at*tend a dedication ceremony at the 18.3 - million St. Edward Mercy Hospital. ·'' - Ford is making the short Arkansas stop: ; ' over en route from Washington to his va- '···· 'cation home in Vail, Colo. I · As of Saturday, the refugee population £ «at Chaffee -the best-equipped refugee £ 'center-was 20.877. Cannavo said another £ ^22.191 refugees have been released from ? -the camp. . Chaffee is scheduled to operate as a ref- *ugee center longer than the other three camps. Plans call for Chaffee to be closed t in mid-Decemhfc college graduates for its officer corps. The principal reason for this interest in the military--it began about two years ago and is still intensifying--is the grim employment prospects-for those just out of college. (There has been a parallel attraction of the armed forces for enlisted men just out of high school.) "The economy is a major factor with officer volunteers," a Marine recruiter declared. "I'd like to think it was us, that we're doing our jobs, but it's not. It's the ·economy. We get a lot of people who have been out of college two or three months. They've looked around the job market and found there's not that much to offer, and now they're coming to the military." One of those discouraged by the lack of opportunities in today's job market is Craig Lopes, a 24-year-old who recceived his masters degree in computer science from the State University of New York- Stonybrook. He is joining the Navy. "Most of my friends have been trying to get jobs in private industry and I don't think the opportunities they had were as good as the ones I would-get in the Navy," he said. He looks forward to working on the latest model computers, an opportuni- .ty he doubted he would have as a civilian. Some of the officer candidates were not impressed with the jobs they had been offered,- Some of them have turned to the military in search of a challenge or a position of responsibility. Edward Lane, who has a graduate degree in education from Columbia University, decided to join the Marine Corps because "teaching wasn't challenging enough." Michael Spencer, who majored in economics and geography at Ohio Wesleyan, declared: "I could have gotten some kind of job, but it wouldn't have had the same responsibility--to lead men, and make decisions, like in the Navy." Inmate Confesses To Five Slayings MIAMI (AP)-An inmate at the county jail confessed to five slayings Saturday and led police on a search of a wooded area that turned up one body, officers said. Officers were continuing the search for other possible victims. Spokesmen for the Dade County sheriff's office declined to immediately identify either the inmate or the victim, and other details were sketchy. But he said the inmate, who had been charged with first-degree murder in an apparently unreleated case, "reported to detectives that he knew where the human remains could be located in the South Dade area. -4848 SUNDAY MONDA mrs^ NO-IRON PRINT TOPS - FOOD WMP 200'x12" PLASTIC WHAP Our Reg. 4.97 , Our Reg. 66c Press to cling Screen prints | or patterns I in polyester. | Misses'sizes. Your Choice I" Our Reg. 5.57 ; X-size* .4.50 ' Pocketed, long-sleeve fall styles dark 'n dusty solids Polyester/cotton in newprints. Save! FASHION BARBETTES 2 DAYS ONLY Our Reg. 47e MEN'S SLIP-ONS Our Reg. 4.97 66 2 Days JR. BOYS' I SPORT SHIRTS! Our Reg. 3.48 Ea. | KRMAMNTI £^ $ FOR Black canvas crepe-type sole cushion insole. Long- sleeve polyester/ c o t ton patch prints. Flap pocket. 2-WAYAWI- FM RADIO Our Reg. 25.97 PLASTIC SINK SET 50 BOOK MATCHES Our Reg. 2.47 20-matches per book. 50--Books to a box. 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