Sunday Gazette-Mail from Charleston, West Virginia on August 13, 1972 · Page 66
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August 13, 1972

Sunday Gazette-Mail from Charleston, West Virginia · Page 66

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Charleston, West Virginia
Issue Date:
Sunday, August 13, 1972
Page:
Page 66
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Famous Fables By E.E. Edgar IMPROVEMENT: Once, in a Paris museum, artist Pierre Bonnard came upon a canvas which he had painted some twenty years earlier. As he studied it, it struck him that a few well-placed brush strokes would greatly improve it. The following day, he came back with his paints and brushes. He waited until the attendent was looking e l s e w h e r e and then proceeded to touch up the picture. CLUTTER: Early in his career, Pablo Picasso shared a studio with a friend. The latter worked during the day and slept in the bed at night, while Picasso painted through the night and occupied the bed during the day. Despite the difficulties posed by such an arrangement, Picasso produced a prodigious number of paintings during this period. Every morning, when the friend awoke, he would find the floor covered with pictures, some still wet. As he made his way about, he could not avoid stepping on some of them. Years later, when Picasso was famous, and his early works were in demand, these footprints had to be removed from dozens of his canvases. Now...Plastic Cream Revolutionizes Denture Wearing For the first time, science now offers a unique plastic cream that holds dentures--both "uppers" and "lowers --as they've never been held before. It forms an elastic membrane tliat help;, hold your dentures to the natural tissues of your mouth. It's FixqnENT*--a revolutionary discovery for daily home use. So different it's protected by U. S. Patent #3.003.988. FIXODKNT not only holds dentures firmer, but it'holds them 2m more comfortably, too. It's so elastic you may bile harder, chew better, eat more naturally. The special pencil-point dispenser lets you put FIXODENT exactly where it's needed. Resists oozing over and gagging. Just one application may last for hours. Dentures that fit are essential to health. See your dentist regularly. Get easy-to-use FIXODENT Denture Adhesive Cream at all drug counters. -- Adv. --. CHARLESTON, W.VA. The Elimination of Lev Bronstein By George Nearns The erasure of Lev Bronstein was a classic example of life and death in gangland. The guy knew too much and was showing all the signs of singing. Even half a world away from Joe Djugashvili he was not safe. His end was inevitable. And in his heart Lev knew that. The axeman called on August 20, 1940. The assassin was disposable and he took the rap. All the world knew Joe had given the nod, but the world was powerless. Joe was outside the law. In fact, Joe made the law and changed the law if he did not like it. He was the archetypal Mr. Big. He was Joe Stalin and Lev Bronstein was more usually known as Leon Trotsky. The two men had once been on the same side, as founding fathers of the Russian Revolution, but as Stalin rose to power following the death of Lenin, he tried to sweep away all potential rivals. Many died with repentance for "error" on their lips, but Trotsky got away. He went first to Turkey, then to Norway, but always it was safer to keep moving. He found sanctuary in Mexico where a bargain was struck--safety for himself, his wife and grandson and freedom to conduct his own political and private affairs, in return for a promise not to use his prestige to raise the local temperature. Trotsky kept his bargain, though he did not leave his security solely to the good offices of his hosts. He hired his own guards to supplement the local police. He turned his home into a fortress, with early warning devices and fire-positions from which armed assault might be repulsed. He knew he was only buying time, but he had a job to do. He began writing Stalin's biography, an enterprise which in its turn merely made his removal more urgent. Stalin made the first breach in the walls, by putting the Mexican Communist Party up to protesting about the cost to the taxpayers of providing him with so much protection. The official guard was whittled down. Then came the first attack, on May 23, 1940. In the early hours three men, two dressed as police officers, the third disguised - "While Trotsky wa» looking down, Jackson slipped the ax from under his coat." in army uniform approached the police post. They disarmed the guard and were let into the house. The only witnesses of the onslaught were the victims, and they were too concerned with self-preservation to act as dispassionate observers. But it would seem that as many as 20 armed men made the ultimate attack. It was short and sharp, with the effort directed at rooms occupied by the Trotsky family. After the shooting with automatic weapons, incendiary bombs were thrown. Considering its intensity, the raid was a fiasco. The only casualty was the grandson, whose leg was grazed. The only physical damage was scorched paintwork and a charred patch of lawn. The Mexican authorities were at first sceptical. It looked a bit like a stunt to discredit Stalin and the Communists. The guard might reasonably have been overcome, but Intruders could not still have entered the house unless they were admitted from within. Was it then a put-up job? Or was there a traitor? The traitor theory gained ground when it was found that one of the household, an American employed as a secretary, was missing. He had been the guard on the gate, and after the raid he was seen to drive away with the attackers in one of Trotsky's cars. He alone knew where the ignition keys were kept. Later the man was found. He had been shot and buried in lime. There were still two ways of looking at this aspect of the affair. The police took the view that he was rubbed Sunday, Gazette-Mail

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