The Daily Courier from Connellsville, Pennsylvania on April 15, 1918 · Page 10
Get access to this page with a Free Trial
Click to view larger version
April 15, 1918

The Daily Courier from Connellsville, Pennsylvania · Page 10

Publication:
Location:
Connellsville, Pennsylvania
Issue Date:
Monday, April 15, 1918
Page:
Page 10
Cancel
Start Free Trial

Page 10 article text (OCR)

PAGE TEN. TJtLKJ COUK.1BR, CONNBLLSVILJOE, PA. MONDAY, APRIL 15, 1918. mi; P 3 ORDER OF ELKS IS AN INSTITUTION PURELYAMERICAN Yr« Or%]aallr Known is "The JoriyCorks," Theatrical Folks.. HAB BIRTH IN NEW YORK Adopted in 1SCS; Elk Tfon 9rcr*]i4fialo by Kanow Hargia ol ' SB»«J»T»te; S»w is £ee»fiiise4 In the World. tive Order onant and euphoa- . designating an order eoBCTiT.efcin3.the fundamental principle:: of .'.charity, vjustice, brotherly loM/aiid'ndeJity, had its origiii nearly 3a yeari ago. In this short space of l*a»-ttiaa' two'store years an organiza- tim :L -origui»lly : .known as thu "Jolly in character and ':-;±h«- members of the the- l profession in New XorfcQiJfcn«s*;ezpanded Into a po'wer- iut'^ordat:of..international' standing. : Charres,".41ge3ni6ii Sidney Vivian, son o£.iny5iijiish~'cleTgymau, is authorit- atively'credited with being tho paternal ancestor of the B. P. O. E., tbe ^A?3Ss?£,S ioBtei a: a meeting in -'Ntnr^Yoglfr'-faeld- on February 16, 18fi8- ·ftPf ajmarggf of one vote wao the elk chosen above the buffalo -as the 'zoological shibboleth of the, order..Tie constitution and -bj=laws -were adopted in the following month and the infant fairly .was out of twaddling clothes. BJchard B. Sterily, the succeeding year, became exalied ruler and shortly afterwards the memher- shijt restrictions were expanded so as . .tot-include those of all bright lights .in the worlds of art, music, literature, science, etc. An act of the New York assembly passed March 10, 1871, and two days later the Philadelphia lodge wa» installed. "It was'not until 1870 that the San Francisco lodge was in- 3t*ll«d. It was in the year 1886 when 20 lodges were installed that the lodge experienced its first great boom that presaged the tremendous growth it was to enjoy later. The lodge Is purely an American institution. The Stars and Stripes are draped, over the-altar and-each mem- ' ber is'-by : virfue^of hds'minabersaii trua citizen and loyal follower of the Sag. The lodge has nothing of mercenary nature, offers no pecuniary advantage that would induce membership and offers no insurance. It is essentially an organization that, apr ' peals to the best there is in mau and ' no one may join it who does not srjb- · scribe to- its tenets, principles and teachings. Keeping over green in the hearts of ; tha members toe memory of the departed is one ot the most beautiful ' · of the teachings of the order and it is symbolized in the 11 o'clock toast, "To Our Absent Brothers." Every · where throughout the country where there Is ail Elks' lodge the thoughts of the living revert at 11 o'clock to those "that have departed this life in the body Jnt ever are with us in the spirit The Elks' lodge is entirely tree from, both political and religious prejudice. A belief in the existence of a Supreme Being is all.' The~lodge"is not concerned with the form in which thii belief is expressed In the church affiliation ot its members, the organization being predicated on the belief of its membership. In the imper- ixhable principles of charity,- justice, brotherly lore- and-- fidelity," The spreading arms of this broad'belief in man for nan embraces the Jew and the jen.tile,--the-; Catholic-.-and' the Protestant,: the rich and the poor, all mam. that .believe, in the. Fatherhood of God and the common, brotherhood of ThV.motto'/ at ae.."order; is^ The fanMs" of oof 'brothers "we "write upon the lands, and their virtues upon the tablet! ot lore and memory," with the around work and foundation ot the golden rule for life: "Do unto otliers as.iou -would they; shonld^do unto -yott"-Our'colOT3 are ipnrple and whit and the floral emblem "that blue and bright-^ystf-floiwer: pf the, brook,, hope'* gentle 'gem, forget-me-not" The songs sung in the lodge room are "The Star Spangled Banner," "Nearer, My God, to Thee," "Home, Swett Home" and "Anld Lang Syne." THREE UNITED FIRE BRICK PLANTS ARE SOLD FOR $180,000 Sale SftattA to C«*rt la Tinioatowa Ttt* Horning By The Becriter*. Sale of the three plants ".of the United Fire Brick company for J180,- 000 was reported to court jnrUnion- town Thursday by the receivers, T. B. Palmer, Harry UTiyel and V. B. Markill. --'- ' - : -. .· ' -' The Uniontowii "Real" Estate company becomes owner of tbe Duubar plant of 3,200 acres for 1125,000. George 'Whyel bought^he two remaining plants, one .of; 350 acres at Fair-' chance and the other at Fairhope, Somerset county. Tatronize those -who advertise. CONNIE ilACJC HAS HOPE Corinle MacV. ccn't »ce why baseball writers'everywhere are predicting utter ruin lor .him * next summer. "My team won't be so very bad,TM says Mack. "Xo, it woa't x be E3 good as I would like. It won't be a pennant winner; 'that i Is, I hardly think 1C wiU; but My team will play some mighty good bweball; or :lse I «hall be creatly mlitaken, I may finish eighth, but 1 don't expect to." PRIVATE TRACK FOR HIS THOROUGHBREDS Willis Sharp* KUmer, eapttalhrt and" · sportsman" of international "reputation, has a private racetrack at his beautiful tctate at'Blnghamton, 14. T. Mr. KQmer, who -is -the owner .of the Bmghamton Press, has several high- class thoroughbreds In his stables, Including Snn Briar, the champion two- year-old of 1017. Sou Briar .is'named after Mr, Kilmer's estate Sun Briar Court .OF DRAFTED MEMO BE: TAKEN Of JN SCHOOLS Tederal Board for Vocational Education Preparing Courses of Study for State Schools. A war-emergency course to train conscripted men for machine-shop occupations, blacksmithing, 's'aeet-metal ·working, and pipe fitting has been prepared by the Federal Board lor Vocational Education'and will be distributed to the schools throughout the country as soou as it can be printed. It is known as Bulletin No. 8. . "There is a critical and constantly growing need for many thousands o£ mechanics and technicians for Army occupations carried on in and behind the lines oJ the United States Army,'" declares the Board for Vocational Education." "Many of 'these workers, already"erperienced in. similar occupations of civil life, will be secured through the draft and possibly through voluntary enlistment It Is recognized by those iri a position to know that the quotas thus obtained will not be sufficient, and that it will be necesary to give special training to many thousands of men for various occupations and in various ways. The War Department has taken definite steps to provide for this training systematically through Army schools and In some Instances at cantonments, but largely at -the industrial, trade, and engineering schools of tbe country." The Federal Board for Vocational Education is acting for the War De-: partment ic preparing ticse courses of stndy and in dealing with the state , authorities in charge of the school work. Men who take .these courses, it is' declared, "should not be led to .believe that they are learning a trade. ..They are. serving their country by learning to do a special job well, though to some extent" this, training may be beneficial ..to .them in alter life." ELKS' MEMBERSHIP CARD EVIDENCE OF "-·"·-U. S. CITIZENSHIP Its Possession Is a Passport Any- where From Coast to Coast, .'.·Without Qnestion. The following shows how an Elk's card proved valuable in the European war 'zone, says the Jolly Elk: ''On the morning of that historic day, August 1, 1914, in Berlin, Germany,'. Broth'er .Robert. W. Kiewert, of Milwaukee Lodge, No. 4C, jead'that ail foreigners were to provide themselves -with passports,'.'for uo one''without proper credentials would therafter be permitted, to move about Europe. He immediately called at the embassy of the United States arid made application for an emergency passport, being unable to talk the German language (more so the Berlin dialect) like a' native he had a premonition that he would be taken lor a German and possibly get into difficulty ·ith the military authorities' upon leaving the country. . . · · Our ambassador, Mr. J. W. Gerard, asked, "Have you anything to show that you are a citizen of the United States?" "Without hesitation, Brother ·ert presented b-s. membership cord, showing him to be an Elk in good standing, with a comment, "How's that?" "Nothing better in all 1 the world," was the ambassador's reply; and _'our brother was provided | with passports, which" carried him j safely out of the war zone. j Brother Kiewert, born in \Iilwau- kee, jimed No. 46 in 1900, became a ·4yife nwmber in 1914 ^and claims that while lie always carr'ied-his membership cs:.rd .with him, in this purticular instance it brought home : -very, forcibly .upon him of what.real, and : true vitue ':the ckrd.'really is, to any Elk j good standing.' ' j John Madison · ·/ · · V · · ' .n^C" ·*/. · " . ' " ' : = -"-·:" Billiard Room Confectionery Tob- bacco Cigars West Side Connellsville, Pa. Compliment W. A. Miller West Pcnii Bowling West Crawford Avenue ConneDsvifle, Pa. Hotel Vanderbilt Vanderbiit, Pa. -Q 8..P. 6. E. Gsbora Youakin Wholesale Fruits and Produce Conndlsyille, Pa. : oooooooooooooooooooooooooo 8 HARRY DULL fetdass Livery * -D- julius Schlinger Broadford Hotel Broadford, Pa. . - . . One of the incomprehensible things to a child la the fashion' some grownup people bane of promising and for- tetttng. There ii no surer way to M a child's confidence and tote. They do not understand excuses or tha pressure ot circumstances; they I «*u »T*«MUIC: wi v*i^uwii*«»ticw«; taey i v , ** «« «««. . «v ^^.^%J»L?**Z* \ ConndlsviUe/Pa. she. didn't" One child wto bad used he word "promiae" ww a«ked"to tell ta'aoeaning. He replied: "To' promise t to keep it in your mind, keep it to your mind, keep it in yoar mind tin ·oil do if-- Liverpool Post ".···- 1 opccooooooopoocooooooooooo OHIOPYLE HOUSE The Ideal Hotel For a Summer Outing--Courteous Treatment Write for Rates--Bar Attached MAX RUSH, Proprietor . OHiopyle Falls, Pa.

Get full access with a Free Trial

Start Free Trial

What members have found on this page