Sunday Gazette-Mail from Charleston, West Virginia on June 2, 1974 · Page 75
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June 2, 1974

Sunday Gazette-Mail from Charleston, West Virginia · Page 75

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Charleston, West Virginia
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Sunday, June 2, 1974
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Page 75
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HOW DOES YOUR GARDEN GROW? These Roses Are Fragrantly All-American ARIZONA, GRANDIFLORA ROSE Colorful As The State For Which It Is Named By Anne Howard Garden Editor A grandiflora, a hybrid tea, and a floribunda are the winners of the 1975 All- America Rose Selections awards just announced. The three winners, all delightfully fragrant, are Arizona, a multicolored grandiflora; Oregold, a yellow hybrid tea; and Rose Parade, a pink floribunda. »· Arizona is perhaps the most unusual color of any award-winning rose in recent years -- or maybe of any year! It is a combination of bronze and copper/with various shadings of yellow, red, pink, and orange. This grandiflora is not only refreshingly different in color but has a delicious tea rose fragrance. It is, in fact, an Arizona sunset of a rose, with a fragrance as fresh and clear as the desert air. Arizona's well-shaped buds are a blend of bronze and copper tones, opening to double blooms up to four inches across. As they unfold, the flowers take on a blend of yellow, copper and pink shadings, some of which deepen to scarlet with an occasional rich crimson suffusing the outer petal margins. Arizona is a vigorous grower with good, sturdy stems, each carrying several blossoms in a neat, candelabra effect above the tall plants: The bushes branch freely, producing cutting quality blooms throughout the summer and often bearing enough blooms on a single plant at one time to provide a fine bouquet. New foliage comes in a shiny mahogany, gradually turning to mahogany green and maturing dark green with a thick leathery texture. Arizona is remarkably free from mildew and has above average resistance to black spot. ' ; . This new award winner should prove very popular as a garden and exhibition rose. If allowed to grow to its full height of about six feet, it would be ideal for use as a tall, beautifully flowering hedge. It also may be used with good effect in locations at the center of large rose beds and as back plantings in rose borders. Arizona is the third consecutive winner originated by Ollie Weeks of Ontario, Calif., who also produced the 1973 and 1974 AARS winners, Gypsy and Perfume Delight. *· Oregold comes from Germany and is a deep, pure yellow hybrid tea. (You VILL LIKE this rose!) It is the only deep yellow rose to win an award since King's Ransom in 1962, although Apollo, in 1972, was a soft yellow winner. Oregold's buds are oval pointed, opening to high centered five-inch blooms. It has the distinctly opulent form of Peace and, in fact, might well be termed a golden Peace. The blooms are of heavy substance, 35 to 40 petals, usually borne singly on eight to 14-inch stems. With good lasting quality, long stems, a delicate hybrid tea fragrance, and fine bud shape, this rose should be ideal as a cut flower and will, no doubt, give a good account of itself as a show rose as well. · Oregold is a vigorous grower, rather unusual in a yellow rose, with shapely, well- branched, rather thorny plants, complete- ·; . $L _ ! ( ly clothed with dark green, wide oval leaflets. Following the trend of recent years back to fragrant roses, Oregold has a distinct sweet tea perfume and, although it does not produce masses of blooms throughout the growing season, it is never without flowers. It is not just another yellow rose, and could well be a distinct advance in yellow roses because of its general good garden quality. The hybridizer of Oregold is R. Matthias Tantau of Germany, and its ancestry includes such popular rose varieties as Peace, McGredy's Yellow, Kordes Perfecta, and Tropicana. » Rose Parade is a light coral pink floribunda -- a compact, shapely, two to three foot bush, thickly- set with two and a half inch flowers, delicately highlighted with shadings of peach. Actually, the color reports on this rose from the All-America test gardens throughout the nation vary from clear pink to rose pink to pink with darker shadings, to pink, yellow and coral blend, so evidently Rose Parade varies considerably in color, depending upon area and climate. The clusters of buds, borne continuously, open slowly.to perfectly formed full blooms contrasting beautifully with the abundant dark green foliage. As an additional and very important asset, these flowers are richly fragrant. Rose Parade has a true floribunda growth habit, being of medium height, symmetrical, compact mound-like, with heavy, glossy foliage which is thick and abundant, covering the plant so well you cannot see the main branches. Rose-P.arade is the rather rare example of a floribunda that not only is ideal for mass planting and general garden work, but can serve with equal charm and effectiveness as a specimen plant. No doubt it will prove an excellent tub plant as well. The flowers last well, fade slowly and drop cleanly when their blooming period is over. On occasion throughout the blooming period, the plant is a mass of-bloom, and at other times it bloomsjightly, as though gathering strength for another mass effort: June 2. 1974 Rose Parade's hybridizer is J. Benjamin Williams of Silver Spring, Md. * * · WHAT IS a hybrid tea? These are those large, classically, formed roses growing with a single magnificent bloom on a tall, regal stem. Hybrid teas are considered the aristocrats of the flower world and date back to 1867. . ; : . · * * * . WHAT IS a floribunda? Floribunda means "flowers in abundance." This is a popular class of rose that is superb for landscaping. It has been in existence since 1924. Floribundas bear a generally smaller bloom with flowers produced in profusion in bouquet-like clusters covering the plant. Floribundas are particularly valuable where massed color is desired. They bloom continuously from early summer until frost. * * * · ' . - . ; · WHAT IS a grandiflora? This is a relatively new class of rose -- first introduced by All-America Rose Selections in 1954. It has steadily grown in popularity. Grandi- floras combine all of the fine attributes of the hybrid tea and the floribunda into a hardy, taller-growing plant that produces small clusters of medium to large size flowers on long stems, together with some stems bearing individual blooms, all very suitable for cutting. Use where tall^upright bushes are needed. :' -, . . . ... AND WHAT IS the All-America Rose Selections? The AARS is a'hon-profit rose testing organization, with 23 official rose testing gardens scattered throughout the United States. 'These gardens are so located that the .variations in soil and climatic conditions are well covered for all the major areas in which roses are grown. Under the AARS testing program, plants are trial grown under actual garden conditions. During the two-year testing period for each entry, the test gardens must be maintained as required by the AARS test garden committee which specifies normal care such as would be provided by the ordinary good gardener. The roses may be judged only by an official AARS judge and there is one assigned to each test garden. Official judges do not gain their appointments easily, as each must serve a carefully supervised two-year apprenticeship before he can hope ot obtain his judgeship. . · " The scoring procedures, rose characteristics which are to be judged, and the maximum number of scoring points allowed each in the prescribed numerical scoring system, are all under the guidance of the AARS scoring schedule committee. Candidate roses are graded on vigor, habit, hardiness, disease resistance, foliage, flower . production, bud and flower form, opening and finishing color, fragrance, stem and overall value. It is a requirement of AARS that all plants of an award winner be identified by. a green and white oval metal seal. When you see this seal on a plant you are thinking of buying, you can be sure it is a superior rose of quality. OREGOLD, HYBRID TEA ROSE A Really Good Yellow Rose ROSE PARADE, FLORIBUNDA ROSE A Variable Pink, With Shadings Of Peach A

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