Sunday Gazette-Mail from Charleston, West Virginia on July 30, 1972 · Page 75
Get access to this page with a Free Trial
Click to view larger version
July 30, 1972

Sunday Gazette-Mail from Charleston, West Virginia · Page 75

Publication:
Location:
Charleston, West Virginia
Issue Date:
Sunday, July 30, 1972
Page:
Page 75
Cancel
Start Free Trial

Page 75 article text (OCR)

. ,.. - _ · Charleston, West Virjinia- Marshall Team Better, Outcome Uncertain HUNTINGTON-Marshall University football coach Jack Lengyel is expecting to have a better football team this fall--but not necessarily a better record. "We know our players will have improved over last year," said Lengyel. "We will know the players better. Our placement of personnel will be more accurate. But that New State Program Expanded West Virginia State College's new curriculum is entering its second year. But this year the curriculum program has been expanded from just the arts and sciences departments to Include the entire academic structure at State. Adopted by vote of the faculty and students, the new curriculum differs from the traditional format of college education. There are no long lists of required courses, no rigid degree programs, and no minors and double majors for each student. Instead, the student has a long list of innovative and flexible electives. State refers to the new classes as colloquia. small, seminar-type classes. Colloquia courses will change often because they are on contemporary subjects. Some of the colloquial courses include "Wealth and Power in A m e r i c a , " "The H u m a n Brain: Why We Behave Like Animals," and "'Sex and You." THE NEW curriculum is divided into four major sections for students seeking a BA or a BS degree. The sections are general studies, the major, congnates, and the electives. All students must take a type of general education program, including a one credit freshman seminar to acquaint the student and the college. Usually in their freshman or sophomore year, s t u d e n t s must take four, four credit colloquia in literature and language, fine arts, natural sciences and mathematics and social sciences and philosophy. A four credit effective communications or English course and two, four credits in a foreign language follows. The major in the new curriculum ranges from 32 to 48 credit hours. Cognates are courses w i t h i n t h e n e w curriculum that relate to a student's major. doesn't mean we'll have a better record." Lengyel will be starting his second year of f o o t b a l l rebuilding at Marshall since the tragic crash in November 1970 which wiped out most of the players and coaches. LAST YEAR, although composed almost entirelv of freshmen and sophomore players, the Marshall team won two games, defeating Xavier and Bowling Green. "We were fortunate to win two games last year," said Lengyel. The Big Green, however, failed to score a point in its last t h r e e games of the season. "We hope to control the ball more on offense this season," said Lengyel. "Last year were on defense so much that we were worn out in the late quarters." Lengyel said he was very pleased with the team's per- f o r m a n c e d u r i n g s p r i n g practice. "I saw a great deal of maturity in the players over last year," said Lengyel. THE MARSHALL coach said two juniors, Reggie Oliver and Dave Walsh, will be the leading candidates for the quarterback'position. They split the signal-calling duties lasj season. Co-captians for the Big Green will be Chuck Wright, a tackle from Charleston and Randy Kerr, a tight end from On the Right Track When classes take up on campus this fall, the fashion-conscious coed will want the classiest clothes she can find. Already on the right track are these three representatives from Coyle's who will be doing informal modeling in the- .store as well as on the streets of Charleston this week. Pam Drown Girlando of Morris H a r v e y C o l l e g e ( l e f t ) likes the looks of t h i s crisp brown tweed pantsuit, while Claudia Del Chi-idice ( c e n t e r ) of Clark University opts for perky plaid coor- dinates-a button-front maxilength skirt and matching blazer worn with a maize sweater shirt. Dru Casdorph of West Virginia University rates a fashion A- Pius m her red and black plaid boot-top dress worn o. course, wiin knee-high boots. Nancy Leonoro of Morns Harvey also will participate in the modelin- project, designed to a c q u a i n t other girls with the s ore s du-erse collection of back-to-school clothes. (Photo by LeoChabot) St. Petersburg, Fla. - Lengyel said he was looking for another-big year, from Lanny Steed, who was spectacular last season as a freshman pass-catching end from East Bank. "Lanny got married and I don't know how that will affect his play," said Lengyel. [ G.W.Due { Language I Project : George Washington High School will have a foreign language project, the result of school-community relations. A girl from Bucaramanga, Colombia, and a boy from Chaumont, France, will be teacher aides at George Washington for a year. She will teach Spanish and he will teach French. "Persons who speak a foreign language as their own are especially good teachers in conversational situations," Mrs. Mary Sullivan said. "Many persons who studied a foreign language and traveled found that the language they studied in the classroom was quite different from the language spoken in the foreign county. We hope this program will improve the situation." MRS. SULLIVAN is head of the school's foreign language department. "The community, as well as school personnel,' is excited about the pilot program. Members of the Foreign Language Department really got the ball rolling. With help from the Parents Advisory Council we worked out the' f u n d i n g and set up host f a m i l i e s , " s a i d J o h n McClaugherty. The foreign students will assist George Washington teachers in foreign language classes. The new program is being done through Amity Institute, aprivate, educational, non-profit service. The Amity a i d e p r o g r a m p r o v i d e s scholarships for young people from Spanish-, French-and German-speaking countries to participate in an intern- t e a c h i n g s i t u a t i o n i n American schools. The visitors will help individual students or conversation g r o u p s , r e c o r d l e s s o n materials, serve as language models and assist teachers presenting language and culture. The ..Colombian and French students will be available to speak to civic groups. ~ WW A f ^ s P eak t° civic groups. . n. Adapts to Changing Business Technology Adapting to a world where a machine can spew out a warehouse of information on command might be an intimidating experience for one unfamiliar with such an electronic encyclopedia. Morris Harvey College is attempting to resolve this dilemma for its students who will be entering business and scientific professions where the computer has become almost as common as the typewriter. The first step was the introduction of a basic course in data processing which was added to the curriculum of the department of business administration and secretarial science. This fall, however, a new opportunity will open up with an addition, o f f e r e d exp e r i m e n t a l l y , t o t h e c u r r i c u l u m o f t h e mathematics department. MATHEMATICS, 500, like Business Administration 330. will begin with a fundamental introduction to the uses and limitations of the computer, and a basic familiarization with the operation of the equipment. From this point on, however, the two courses part ways. The business course takes up the study of a computer language particularly designed for programming business data, while the math course pursues an altogether different language, one in- vented especially for scien- t i f i c and m a t h e m a t i c a l information. Ultimately, though, it is hoped that both courses will lead to the same results, explains Dr. Robert Landolt, professor of economics and business administration.

Get full access with a Free Trial

Start Free Trial

What members have found on this page