The Daily Courier from Connellsville, Pennsylvania on January 13, 1930 · Page 12
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January 13, 1930

The Daily Courier from Connellsville, Pennsylvania · Page 12

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Connellsville, Pennsylvania
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Monday, January 13, 1930
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PAGE TWELVE. 1lriE UAiLiY UUUI.-U.rvn, UUINP ffiljJUB V i UljXli, J- jvrONnAY, JANUARY 13, 1030. Prohibition nr 1 i TV i i I 1 enth Dirtnda versary WASHINGTON, Jan. 13--The E l R h t o a n t h l o r P r o h l b ' t l o u A m e n d m e n t was RubinlUod (o (ho Bin ten by Congrats Doco-mber 18, 1917. The socrelnvy of Stain pfotlalnw! It In effpi-l iu, of January IB, 1020--Iho olTIclnl b i r t h d a y of federal p r o n l b i t t o n . Tho Volstwirt Act bocalno c f f o t i h i | I h o '(iri/mij da|e. ^I'lio A m r n d i n o n i rc-adr,; "I. A f t o r ono year from the r/ttincuttoiij of I lite ni I He t h o inanuf'aotyir'o.J fUih 1 ,, or^tj-ansportiulon i f UHoxIcnlltiR liquors within, )ho Importation thoreot I n t o , or tho oxi/ojrtatlon thereof fjinm the' bulled Slatca uiul n i l t o r r l t o r y eubjoct to rhc jurisdiction tlieroof tor bevernpo ptirpo- ce la horeby prohibited. * 2" Thfi ConproF« ami the several fltntcfl elmll have ·oiicuvrcnt power to enforce (his a r U c I o legislation. I "3. This article shall be Inoperative u n l a n It eh'Ul havo boon r a t i f i e d nf, an a m e n d m e n t the Legislatures of the several aUitefl, as provided In Iho ConulUutlon, w i t h i n eeven yea re .ubmlsslon hereof to tho Statea by the Cougrcfifi." Tht following la tho first ot a Boricfl of articles by lenders of both sidre of the question: to I lie- f r o m by o p p r o n r i a t o C'onsHlutlon by ( h n dato ot Iho By KRNfflST II. CHERKINOTON 1,1 tt. IX, 13i. D. General Secretary World Ijcapuo Ag-nlnst Alcoholism. llrci-tor Do- partmant of Education of tho A n t i Saloon L«asfue of America, and General Manager ot Its PubllshlnK Interests. ( W r i t t e n for the United Press*.) The tenth anniversary of the 18th amon'chrwnit finds tho Anti-Saloon T/eague of America preparing for a greater and more extensive program than ever l-efore in Its history. Prohibition le not the final solution of the beverago alcohol problem. It never wae Intended to be tho final eo- lutlon, lor the adoption of legislation never fully roes away with the ovlt against which tho legislation la directed. Prohibition is a meant* to the end nought, w h i c h is the freedom if the nation from the effects of alcoholism. There remains yet a vast amount of work to be done In completely settling the alcohol problem, Prohibition liae made the ilnal solution possible, by taking away legal santlon and governmental protection from the liquor traffic. The Anti-Saloon League was organized at Obr-rlln, May 24, 1393. Prior to its organization the activity of temperance organization had been largely of a partisan character. The purpose of the organization Is very definitely Htated in the constitution of the organization to be "the extermination of the beverage liquor traffic." He methods from the first have been education -- the creating of sentiment have been lie ellorts In tho past, the service which It w i l l be ciblo to render in the t f u t u r e are of even inoro Importance The Anti-Saloon League of America la governed in rill IU operations by a board of direct* ru, members o£ which nation-il board . ro elected by the several state botirc'a of truetaes. These tstato boards o! ct and employ their own state ofiltx ra'anfl state workers. The state board , in t u r n , are composed, in' the main of representatives of state religious denominational groups, directly eloeled by the eevoral denominations ami responsible to ( those denominational bodies. Plan Wide Observance The depart mi nt of publishing 1n- torcdte which i iclndei the American By MRS KJ-iljA A BOOLE) President N a t i o n a l Wtmmn'a C h r l n - tlttii Tempo u n c o U n i o n ( W r i t t e n f o r the U n i t e d I'rnss) Five years after the Pilgrims landed at Plymouth tho llrst foaloon waj opened on the American conti- n e n t ; and in the 2Qo years that ensued between that event and (he adoption of the ISth amendment In January IB, 15)20, tho people of th!a country tried every known method of d e a l i n g with the problems of the liquor traffic and concluded thai tho only t.afo way waa completely to prohibit tho manufacture, sale, tranbportation, oxpoilation and importation of alcoholic beverage liquor. Tho object of p r o h i b i t i o n wan to prelect the American, home from tho lesuo Publkihln · Company at Wo-stcr- tlrlnlc traffic am] tho d i i n k habit, vllle, la one of i h e very impoitant de- p a r t m e n t s of t l t o League. For 20 years it has prii ted periodic-lie, t r a c t s , ·booklets, poetei s and other temperance literature, Home of Its in qoveral languages, w h i c h have not only been distributed throughout all of America, but have gone, too, to every civilised nation on earth During the tweniy- year period jus ended tha p l n n t has put out in litor.iture an e q u h u l e n t of 9,000,000,000 bot k pages, in round numbers, equal o "0 times around the earth, If laid ed^e to edge The national nrcsldont of tho A n t i Saloon League of America in Blnhop Thomas Nicholf- )n, Methodint Bpisoo- pal church, D e t i o i t a r e a ; g^nnral -up- orlntonJent, He\ Dr. K Scott Mcltrido, Washington; d 1 sector of the educational depart mi n t , Rrnest H. f'lii*r- against all forms of alcoholism; organization the eryeftillizatlon of «en- i rlngton, Wester llle, rocordinc: secrr timent Into public opinion; legislation | tary, S. 10. N l c h i - l e o n . Now Vork City --the translation of public opinion Into law; and adminlfittation-- the enforcement of law. Temperance Sentiment, The fit-tit work of the Anti-Saloon League was. t.he organization and oor- relation of t e m p e r a n c e honorary trefwu -er, F\wtor Copel.md, C o l u m b u s b ( i n l i « r , tittornc}, K. I! T)unford, Wash n p t o n ; penoial m a n - ager of publtehi ig luteretfl, Krne'-t H. C h e r r l n g t o n . A l l over l h United States the f r l o n r l s of Ihe A iti-Snloon Loiigue u n d sentiment In tho United Stateti. Little of that H O U - I O ! p r o h i b i t i o n a - c p l a n n i n g «o o t i m e n t actually had been translated ( i n ,i llttlni? wa ihe goins,' I n t o into e f f e c t i v e legislation at the- time -of n a t i o n a l pi hlbition. In Hmc the League, was organised. ( Tho Anti-Saloon l.oiisjue nl\\i.\.- has been I n t e r d e n o m i n a t i o n a l and non} partisan. U began w i t h small objo-th. I indeed. U first Bought pai-t,;ige of local option 'aws under w h i c h villaf,'"- and townshlim m i g h t vote on w h e t h e r or no tlipy s-houll Iwuiiah the l i q u o r t r a f l i c . 'I'h' 1 League worked t h r o u g h individual*, not p o l l t l u U parties as ( Mti-h, and w i t h IIHMI and w o m e n rcpro- | sontiiiK all i-huroh denominatious. As. j last an p i - O K i o n t s i v c - s e n t i m e n t caino p n . i (be I/eaKUe roi oiumendel and fought tor legislation n u m i b i n g t h e nizo of j I h o l o a l option u n i t , u n t i l that u n i t ; f i n a l l y became (lie c o u n t y and t h e n Iho Htalo, Not u n t i l sentiment had be-n mf- lU-iontly de\ekped and crystallzpd did I IIP A n t l - S H l o o n I/eagiio declare for national prohibition und engage in a c a m p a i g n fi»r ttuit outcome. Tho or- KiinUation t'loti fought for the election of RemitTM s and Congressmen who would Mite- f(r subniltUtjg a prohibit i o n aim-lid men t. It took its pa,rt In tin* program for ratification of tho omemlment and for tho passage of Mipportinc; laws, both federal and '-late. Flmilly. In 1028, tho league and other temperance organizations entered tho presidential campaign t,okMy on tho prohibition laaue. T h r o u g h ill tha actlvitlee o£ the League since its organisation whatever tho Ifctuie of a particular campaign, the chief worlc of tho League lum been that of education. In its plans lor tho futui o tho uioet Important part of the program in to give even more ernphaeifi to educational -work, in the effort to get aoross to live people tho t r u t h about the nature and effect of ilcohol, the truth about the various methods employed for the solution of tho alcohol problem, and the t r u t h about prohibition. Work 'at Capital. In the second place, a very definite p a r t ot tho League's program, repro- M-ntlng. .ts it doe«. a large proportion oi Iho c-hiuch group and tho moral lorces Is to «land on guard at ovory tlfttc- capital and at Washington, ready lo sound tho alarm aglnit insidious efforts to undrmino prohibition law« and to inform lt« conetltuoncy and tho public as to the needs of additional legislation fi otn time to time,-for ul-e- quate enforcement. Third In i h e program i« to help lo back up every national, btato and local public ofllciaki who *oeks to observe lii^ o.th of offico and enforce j the law; ami, what Is even more i m - j porlant. tho c r e a t i o n oC wholesome i ' o i i ' i m e n t amoni; the people for tho n l i ~ f r v n n r e of the law. j 'I in t e rievr was a doy in the Iiib- ! n i \ of n n y ,;i oit «ocui! evel iti w h i c h i f u r i - wan t i u h a wide and exteiu.-,Ke !i ,'pncniuUi !i-^ fh.it np\ being made iiho of by Ihe Uu's if pi oliibitlon. There n e v e r Wii^ a t u n e ' \ h e u a glP.it social e v l d bad MU !i a t r e m e n d o u s linanclnl l u u k i n g as 'n« the l i i j u o r t r a f t i e at t b K prt"-nnt n o m e n t . There- nevei wa-% n t i m e v lion a grc.it social e v i l haI such an i i t e i n a t i o n a l h a c k i n g M-. (h^ o u t l a u u . A m t i i i : i n l i i j u o i irciflie ha-, toJaj Nobody w i l l a f f i r m t h a t p r o h i b i t i o n ha«, tranCil It tie a m a j o r it-Mio MI Ame'MCJi. I ' n t t l It dot's lea'-e to be a major i-t-ue, ;be Anil-Saloon I.eaguo ha* a tiibK to p e r f o r m . I m p o r t a n t as ' e f l c f t of n a t i o n a l pi hibition. In many nlacch (lie chin )i bill(j \ \ i l l be r u n g at high noon. I n other phiio? .spei ii' mep-llngh w i l l b lvM The 2Mh n a t i o n a l u n \ w i U ( i nC Iho Anti-Saloon lifajuio w i l l b e held a t D e t i o i t n e \ t week, a n d t h i t f o i n e n l l f m w i l l give hpei ial emphii-irf U) the a n n i v e r s a r y on J a n u a r y 1'!. I'uprr · 'nfches Fire. Tho Pit p. D i i i a i t i n e n t was s n r n - nuiiied ai 2 ' S d S a f n n U i y n f l e r n ( M u So e x h n g i i K l , a lire t h a t had «t;irtod Tho ISth Amendment makes Lho d r i n k trnillo an outlaw. , Tho drink habit romalna, and line le created ami fostered by the uee of alcoholic llciuora whether they are eold legally or Illegally. The d r i n k habit must bo 1 destroyed; and it can only bo destroyed by total abstinence Prohibition G r a d u a l Process National pi ohlblllon c-amo about gi- d u a l l y . T h i r t y three, states had adopted p i o h l b l t i o n at the time the I S t h a m e n d m e n t beciinit' e f f e c t i v e ; in fact 70 per cent of tha people l i v i n g In more than 90 per rent of I h e t e i - r i t n r y of the United S t u f p R wei e Hv- ins u n d e r s,omo form of prohlbiiton M a n y of the btato l a w s ritinst l l q u n r w o - o m u c h more severe tlian t h e n a t - ional laws today. Tho people n e r l o u d l y intorefited in t h e advance of the n a t i o n und race I n e v i t a b l y ranie i n the roncliijilon thai ( h e r o In no room iV.r Intoxicating l i q u o r in t b w c n u n l i y . A« a n a t i o n wo ji reach t h a t roni limloii for the eani' reasonn t h a t |»d tho r a i l - roii'ls to u d n p t tlieir famous "Hule 0" p r o h i b i t i n g liquor to all railroad em- plo/c«. i'l the ten yoius of pioiifbilioii, tho o p p o n e n t s of i h e 3?th ameruhiii'iit h.np fitaRed n nio«t U o l p n t titlark on ( h e p r o h i b i t i o n Idea, h a v e promoted t h e idea t h n t it i« palrloth- to dir-ub«\v tho law if one does not am PC w i t h it'; l i m e otidfavorcd u» elocl ,i pros!dnt w h u v\nfi i n d l r . n t o j i p o m t i o n t o pro- h i b i t i o r i , b u t Imvo n e \ e r p u t fonvnnl a ( Icar t-iit p i o p r i n i nt n s u b s t i t u t e lor the ISth a m e n d m e n t They h a v e a t t a c k r - d I h e I f g n l U y , i f Die J S l b am 'iidmont in more f h i . n 50 mutt, in ( h i ' S u p r e m e four!, o n l v to meet de~ u p h e l d · by the James t h e o i ' t o r w a l l s o f H u i l d l m a n d t h e in We -it C'rawf.ir ! JUKI iM'uso fhfi'. ciimulated i g n i i -d In bomr There was no d a mage. t!'f Kt. l''rlsKfe i VP n u fr. h.id -IP- H I - i n jipr. social direct Japanese Princess to Wed Emperor's Brother This b e a u t i f u l Japanese maiden is the Princess K i k u k o Tokuj, r :iwj, whoso marring · to Prince Tak.i- matsu, biothei of tin- Jap;uK'.sa Emperor, will take place m tha early Spring of tint, year. Following their b t i l l i m t wedding ceremony, which « i l l be iucoiii[),inicd by the colorfi I splcmloi ol t h e Flowery Kmsjd nn, thu .sount' couple will s-tart in u t o u r of tho world, duriiiLf · m h tliey v, il! vitit tho United Slat j. b^en ho completely h U lesl t r i b u n a l . I t o w o v o r , ( l i p opposition t o t h e I S . h . f n i r ' i K l m p i i t /;cem.s to o v s i d e the t r e m e n d o u s economic and changpri in t h i s r o u n t l y ;u, n result of t h o ISth a m e n d m e n t . , The cofifienfliiH of ocomimlbljj io that | the ?2,000,000,000 a y o u r onco K iven [ f i r r i e a t h e b a r t o t h e d i l n k t r u f f l e Is no\- invested a n d ppent In a nianner which ha« pxpandod tho f u n d a m e n t a l industries of the country, increfi«ed home-owning, and l a t a p r i tho standaul of \merlcan v H y i n g to a p o i n t f a r In oxc"«8 of other kuulo. K x p p r f approx- J m a t l o n a now place the increased buy- liii? powers due to ten years of prohibition at $5,000,000,000 a n n u a l l y . Bur- vey i of fiocial and economic conditions by tnen and women of r e p u t a t i o n till point to the fact that there IB a 're- mendotie decrease In d r i n k i n g and tha a m o u n t of money spent for d r i n k ; no economist has been f o u n d to disagree with prohibition from an economic standpoint; and It ie highly significant thai tho -Wots have never discussed the economic Tjenefits of prohibition, much less denied them. It jfl easy to pick out 10 benefits from thle decade of prohibition. Tlia saloons have gone. It has been an id t h a t the 18th amendment justified itself by closing the saloone oven if II accomplished nothing else, There In lose drunkenness. One can cror,s the continent and not see a d r u n k e n peraon. The surveys of such men aa Prof. I r v i n g Pinner O f Yale load inevitably to this conclusion. Thoro Is less vice. The saloon was a tf.Uoway to Iho red l i g h t district. The United Stateb te clcanor of com- m-erclallzcd vlco t h a n any other country. There IH vastly more wugw All oconoinifilfl give p r o h i b i t i o n n t lo^st u part of ( h o credit. T'lerp te, In addition lo a greater prot p o l i t y , a trernondou.s decrease in the poverty from d r i n k . V;u 5 t b l u m arofis have disappeared Tnere are happier iioince. "The iiKin b r i n g s hir! money home." The I n t e m p e r a n c e of the wago earner created so much unhapiilncsh lu the faaloon ora. There are more homee ; d u r i n g p t o - hlbl ion the n u m b e r of l a m i l t e s Increased 2,300,000; and .\ot iu that Unit wo built inoi'o than ,1,500,000 new llOlBO.S. C h i l d r e n are better o f f , and i h v in the oflleial uUtoninl of the C h i l d i e n ' s B u i . .ui, a part of the U n i t e d Slates O e p i r t m e n t of Labor. id betttM- h e a l t h ; th-c Tinted nsuti showa that the geneial d e a t h i n t o is lower. And in general there la a h a p p i e r U n i t e d Slater of America. T i e w a r utrani'-t l i q u o r \ \ i l l ncvpr t i ' a i - j u i i l i l it j 0 c u n d i r n l i H l ironi tho w 01 'I K n o w l e d g e of ith inetficieney w i l l go «i long w a y (o t h a i tnd. Sfnge and Screen Stars Display Papulrr Fur a Nutrin is the far use / in this smart :oat worn, which is extensively patronized by no ad stage and screen stars. f'lmri'Cter. I ill i C'sit Step Out of H F R A N C E S PAC C o p y r l s l i t , lUuiO, by Stj'b MOW YORK, Jan 1".-- W «nm:Ls have b^en t-aditi ET Juw been ra! her thoioui; 1 I n t o o u r h r d r ' h a t - a m f l s ( · t a l k i n g \Vimi-n h a v o hoe to t h e iden, tln-lr tntero beina; in polo and motor i unit-re h a i r . For snvfiTl so.'ifor's c and polo Mints h a v e Iwr UIOUA terms f o t h a t t h p l a l menUi aro K o m e t h i n p alilri CMiiK-1'd h n l r coiti-, h a v i n g d i s p o s i t i o n to t \.ke .n i w i t h o u t acliialh ( t p i « i n j f i c h a r a c t e r a n ! joini; d r « i - · U l l l r-AWhiin ? ( n e i i U i l l o i e f ^ p r l r i R mode U are i n n r n - r - o The ftilhouptt-' ( hnn^o, froi ;;et tv}M \s-Jii 'b IK -jv?uaUv l i n e p r e f e i rirg t o h t v p tfcoiton frllgh ly l l t t ^ . l will; Iliuxs between t h e h (ch-plac t l i A henillju* e f l e c t c d by t cut, or Rodi'l l i i M H n i e n t T triinmings wl.Irli ne "\c' t/ cal'y the indlvidua 1 !!; of h'dr coalh and l u n ' n and l a u n t y a i M r l i o l l n r s ;ire p i c (-efti the Afei.nt t i e in brlgi f ( t \ r t w i t h f l a s h i n g '-nte at black gityliik. w i t h r.ovol merit to tnatrh, on t h e n a t u h a i r coal. Hero Is fin old f a \ o r i l e In .1 K.vrmoni w h l i - h w i l l a p j l!iilore! w o m a n ns well fl h n s a tiiisto for elaboratlor Knell Hprlnj; -foal: appea- credontinlfi n t I h o e n t r a n t t u t o r sport swenr, for their in Holds of n c t h e fiportewe; long eBlablifched l'rovlde llnea and t r i i n m i n g i i , f h o e coal imikes a f a i r bid Cor i io men and mal n«ho- ci which ii ly d i n n e d rore worth i converted however coatfl of rnel's hair i hynony- 0 (' s h o w n a l l v l d u a l l t y u l 01 iheii W h i l e 1 n i r m a n the Iv^lte-tl, the IP bodice A g r a d u a l wl b^lt am! o c i r c u l a r IP tho fur iatif!;e r;uli- he puinol'i' ?ay]y«k In erred. Ono l a p i n , t h e me elde in cuff trea,f- ·n) cnmol's new prv.Ice, sal lo the . ono who with good ^ of aper- r hns been w i t h new niol's hair w h o n o r s WINS ATTENM iCE BANNER AT RALLY The Christian Sunday Vanderhilt WSB fl\uirdsd dance b a n n e r a( a torn per ai Dnwson D i s t i l c t No 15 o£ i County Siiiulay ,dchool Friday night at the Christ oE VaiKlorbill. Tho aware b a n n e r , based on Hie per attendance, will talce nlai rally In t h e dielrlct John S. Pratl picfeided m-efifing. f i w l r u m e n t i i l n I'urnJahed by an orchestra direction ol! H a r r y 0 Rush. Browell, p tie lor ot the C h r i s t i a n C h u r c l i , g:iv» tho Rev. .1. M. CogU'y, pas'or o odIbt Epli3cop.il C h u r c h of conducted the rlr-volionnla, ; Mi-s V i v i a n Collim-. of Dt trlbuted a i c / j d i n g . C C C dueled a SOUR her vice, w l i h lowol by a tiillc, " T e a c h l n j poranco Leai,on," by A. This was followed by a voc Mrs. D. P. Husband and I* Wilkinson. A m a l e q u a r l o t ol' II. D. Shallpnbeiger, C. W B Gray nml Le\\ ih Mine Uo-v. Poi cy A. Diivin, j)n Christian Oluircli o! Terry* tho principal speakor of t! Ho chos» " I - T o h i h l l i o n " .1 j e c l . Rev. W i l l i a m I f n n i i l t ( l^eii-enriiiK olt'cied pr.i(.r Soltler, p a s l o r of I h o I ' h i l i 1'iin M p m o i U ' l W o i h n d t a l t ' h u r c l i of Haws o n , j n o n o b e n e d i c t i o n . Scli-ool of he atten- oc rally of ho Fayotte issocmtlon ^n Church mg of t h e outage of a it oauh over Iho was u n d e r t h e Rev. R. P. Vondorbilt n vocation. t h e Mcth- .'miderliilt, fter which ivson con- eon- h was fol- tho 'Pern- Van Horn. al duol by us. U C. componod C. Collins, ti, fiing. tor of I ho AViln e evening, his snb- n of West ind W K · 0. C'ocli- E p I h C O J l c l l tin 1 Color Hiu CL.ASCOU', J.in l l - - 0 1 a g o w U n l \ e i b i l r - t i i d c n t ^ , Mkuift i d o h n l t e a t a i u l a ^ a i n ^ t a n y cclor b u n Juno p 'o- to olficeu, ot tlu tun u n g corps the e x c l u s i o n ol' ai I n d i a n . 889. o'H D o p c n d n b l o hhoppliiR 1 'cn(cr. Phono 890. Join OUT Spring Dressmaking Contest! Purchase sufficient Troutman Fabrics to make ·wom- en's, misses' or children's dresses, from cither a standard or original pattorn. You taay submit for judging as many dresses as you desire. Get complete details at our Fabric department. Professional Dressmakers now eligible. When... Enter tho Contest Now . . . Don't Delay. W h y . . . Because ouc new Cotton Fabrics heads the vogtie, and because you may win one of three cash prizes. First Prize, $10. Second Prize, $5. Third Prize, $2.50. Three professional dressmakers of our.city will be the judges. Hemstitching and Picoting Done Here Experienced Dressmaker's Service FREE! We have an experienced Dressmaker in our Fabric Dept., to suggef t and advise you as to the latest and beat Btyles, color combinations and use of PICTORIAL and VOGUE Patterns. See the attractive Finished Models mado from our \ T ew Fabrics. Notion Essentials JVcedU's, pkg ,.., lOc Thread 5c 'to toe Scissors 85c to $l,»j Buttons, doz lOc to $1 Cotton Prints Printed Dimity 86 inch, fast colored Spring Prints in good patterns and f o l o r combinations. Makes ' p r e t t y dresses and aprons. Attractive spring colors ard patterns. 3G inches wide. Novelty Pique 58c yd. Good quality . . . bright new printed patterns on light backgrounds. 3(5 inches wide. FRANK G. WARD, DAIRY MANAGER, IS CALLED BY DEATH F r a n k O Ward, (H, ot Main street, West N c w l o n , niiincigor of t h e Carl Martin Hairy Kami, n o n r Wf-heter, and Cornier Weflt N e w t o n business man, died Hatnr-liy. Mr Wind was AS known In R o s t r n v e r towiwhlp wliore he lived mobl of hit- Hfo. S u r v i v i n g uro his w i d o w , Mr^ Kellio Ward; two MJUS, H e n r y , r e p o r t e r on tho P l t l f i b u r f r Prpf-D, and JamcR. a brother, Harry, and n fchter, Mro. Goorgo Thompson, all of West Newton. Thn f u n e r a l servlco will be held Tuesday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock. I n t e r m e n t - w i l l bo mado In AVer"I Newton Cemetery. Ruffsdale RUFFSDA'^B, Jan. 11.--The Ladies Aid Society of tho Zion Lutlieraii Church hold an all-day ni*-(;tin^; al til* honio of Mrs. Ivucy Long Wednesday. Mi\s. Burl W«avei and' Mrs. Jrs'jp ll'iisljand visutfrd Mrs. Annalelle Slieplar, who is ill at the Jiome of her daughter, M i s James Robinson oC Jp-aunotte. A birthday parly was held at tho h o m e o t Mr and Mis, U. B Raker Saturday evening In honor of 'ttveir daughte-r, Emma. Mrs. Irene M u r d o c k was a oaller at Stewart W^diieiSdaj Ernest Minster -\vas a biiFiiness culler in Scoltdale Tuoday. Mr. and M'ts. Ray T V I u l l spent Wed- n-OF''!ay eveniiiR in Greonfeburfr. B. C. N u l l 1-eft Frlduy for a month's \ j ' " t wfith relatives in Florida. The \Vonic.i's Missionary Society of tlie Christ's Reformed C h u r c h held Its m o n t t i l ) uieeilliiptTiH-fcddj alteiiwou in the churcli. Alo-c Mar ton ).s fjc-rioiisly ill following a l i n g e r i n g Illness o.l! Jlvo yea is. V i a n k Bownuin, J r , i£ i l l v i i t h rhennuUlsm. A i i s John llryan is i l l tit the homo ol! her drHigh.t-cr, M r i . R G. Woiblo. Mrs C'Hfford P a f l M ' = c n o£ Latrobt \ i b i l e d hoi niolli"r i".'Q-iilly. Goose (5 L i t t l e K n o w n The K i i i f i e r u r KOI.*, » ' i l c l i liiecds In imiill tiiiiulicrs on Hie V i i k t u i dellii In A l i i M i i i , K t t i e MKI*-I hintisi'itie und l e n s r l;i!iiui) of n i l (lie w i l d gi'use, of X o r l h A m o r l f i i , d t n i l liolofrlsis dpcluro i''orini'rly a l i u n i l i i n l the nuiU's of t h i s HIIOSP h , i \ c heel) t ) i i i l l \ rI'llui'cd by the lnro:id« n i n d c hy lOsUlinos d u r i n g the our classified advorlisvements. A Ballot for the Dtscrirninofcmg V O T I I I Theatre patrona nre here* afforded nn o p p o r t u n i t y to expjesi t h e i r preference fc r Living Music. * * » * If you believe Hint the esthetic m e r i t , glamour nii'l e m o t i o n n i appeal of real orchestral and orgnn music arc worth p r e s e r v a t i o n in t h e theatre progr.im, SIGN Tl IE COUPON. ·/. jn n -T- Hundreds of the usancls deplore trie s u b s t i t u t i o n of Mechanical Music for Real M me BECAUSE tl fails to give them pleaaure. . . . BECAUSE it threat-ens corruption THE AMERICAN FEDERATION OF A^USICIANS (Comprising 14Q,QQ(.' professional musicians in the United States and Canada) JOSEPH N. \\EBER, President. 1440 Broadway, New York, N. Y. of musical taitc. . . . BECAUSE it discourages development of musical talent. , * » » * One admission fee used to buy real music and a movie--Now it buys a movie, -with talk, and mechanical m u s i c , ·whicH is cheaper an economy for the theatre, not for the patron. * * * « ARE YOU STILL GETTING YOUR MONEY'S WORTH? If not, SIGN THE COUPON. hen mm i l l Everyone can't have cash on hcnd to meet every emergency that pops up f But how good i is to know you can gel i t h e r e a t crny time you reed it) You'll be pleased to find our service so friendly and our repayment plan so convenient. Helping folks who need money quickly is our business. J'JERSONAL FINANCE Co, Second Floor 112 West Crawford Avenue Cher McCrorv's 5 and 10 Ccnc btorc) CONNELLSVILLE, I J A, Tclcphono ConnrllsviUc 3-1 Optn 8:111 to J--Saturday 8:30 to I LICENSED UY 11IC STATH--

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