Sunday Gazette-Mail from Charleston, West Virginia on July 16, 1972 · Page 140
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July 16, 1972

Sunday Gazette-Mail from Charleston, West Virginia · Page 140

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Charleston, West Virginia
Issue Date:
Sunday, July 16, 1972
Page:
Page 140
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Page 140 article text (OCR)

INIELLieENK CONTINUED Among common drugs, aspirin is the best and cheapest pain killer. It is far superior to other, more expensive drugs. So declares a Mayo Clinic investigative team whose report is published In the "New England Journal of Medicine." Would you submit to castration rather than serve a life sentence for sex crimes? Does a court of law have the right to offer such a choice to a sex offender? Judge Robert McLean of Denver, Colo., recently extended that choice to a 42-year-old man charged with 14 counts of child molesting, but otherwise described The offender agreed to the operation. Today, reports Dr. Horace Campbell of Denver, the patient is doing fine, feeling "less aggressive and much happier." He regrets his impotence but successfully holds down a respected position, prefers impotency to J. 1 ITG iTHT?T*^ S 0 *"* "7 Q T " 1 "t It was an article authored by Dr. Campbell, describing similar therapy for European sex criminals, which first interested Judge medical community, particularly psychiatrists, feel such a punishment is not ethically sound. They favor psychiatric treatment for sex criminals, although in CANAL In the heyday of Stalinism, a man could to put to death for Warning: The Surgeon General Has Determined Thai Cigarette Smoking Is Dangerous to Your Health. KING: 19 mg."»*. 14 mg. nicotine. SUPER KING: 20 mg."Br.l5 mg. nicotine, w. per cigarette. FTC Report WR72. McLean in -the option of castration. Dr. Campbell'believes that in some cases such an approach is justified, and in this case the judge agreed with him. Other members of the Colorado this case the defendant had already undergone psychiatric psychoanalysis "but to no avail. In Scandinavia, castration for sex offenders has been an accepted practice for years. inadvertently breaking a machine. It was called "wrecking," an economic crime which warranted capital punishment. Stalin has "been dead for nearly two decades, but many of his laws still re- main on the books in the Soviet Union and its East European satellites. Just last fall the Hungarian Minister of Justice, Mihaly Korom, announced the abolition of the death penalty for economic crimes in his country. "While we believe that the death penalty should remain as the most severe punishment," Kororr. explained, "we think that it should be abolished for economic crimes." ! Most countries require drivers to obtain a license to conduct a vehicle. In Japan, you may soon have to get a license authorizing you to buy a car in the first place. Tokyo's Metropolitan Safety Council recently met to consider measures of combating pollution and traffic congestion, both of which pose serious problems in the city. In its recommendations, the council asked for traffic and ownership restrictions on "those vehicles for which the social need is not very great." Certain areas of Tokyo, for example, would be banned to all but essential vehicles. Smog devices would be required on all cars. Trucks and other large vehicles might be banned altogether during the daytime. And, ultimately, some means would have to be found to curta'l private ownership of "socially superfluous" vehicles. PARADE · IULY Ifi. 107:

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