The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on January 14, 1955 · Page 9
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 9

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Blytheville, Arkansas
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Friday, January 14, 1955
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Page 9
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FRIDAY, JANUARY, 14, 19S5 BLYTHEVILLE (ARK.) COURIER NEWS PAGE NINI REVIEW *«•> FORECAST On Missco Farms By KEITH BILBREY, County Afent 4 I'ni tor the Kids I'm hearing more than I want to hear from people who say the boys and girls ol today are more of a problem, delinquency is i national disgrace, etc. I will admit that it Is a problem that every generation must deal with. •'Here Is a quotation I want you to read: ' "The children now love luxury, they- have bad manners, contempt [of" authority, they contradict their parents, terrorize our teachers." You know who said that? 'Socrates, one of the great men of'ancient history, said that ap- proximatety 2,500 years ago. I am one person who sincerely believes that the young people of 1955 are better behaved, more Intelligent and more cooperative than we were even 20 and 30 years ago. .,!'.. 4-H Club Wlnnerj •We deal with about 1,000 rural 4-H club boys and girls In North Mississippi County annually. We also work closely with the school people in the county. We know rather intimately the goals and problems and achieve- nuHhts of your youth of today. 4-H club work Is a great help in giving your boys and girls worthy objectives. It helps them realize their importance and goals in life. My thanks to your Mississippi County Farm Bureau which will honor about 100 1954 winners and officers this Saturday night at the Hotel Noble in Blytheville. I know that If you could see these boys and girls, the achievements that they have made and the programs they put on you would give n rousing yell, "Hurrah for our youth in 1055!" KoUry HOM Are Good You remember about two years ago when Mr. Carter and I made quite a study of the use of rotary hoes in North Mississippi County? Maybe you saw some of the stories we wrow on the subject, including articles in the local paper, the Delta Press, and even the Progressive Farmer. Maybe we were right in the evaluation. Anyway, I was interested In a report Fred C. Elliott, from the Texas Extension Service, made at last years Cotton Mechanization Conference. In his report a part of a statement from Alabama said, "The greatest progress in mechanical weed control hfus been In the use of the rotary hoe, and It Is the most widely used mechanical practice." Mr. Elliott said a part of the statements from Georgia and the the Carolina's included, "again, the rotary hoe Was reported as one of the most valuable tools." A part of the North Carolina report said, "Rotary hoes are being used extensively in cotton; the trend seems to be toward the broadcast type rather than the attachment type." Louisiana, "By using the rotary hoe ahead of plowing, growers re- duced their weed population 50 per cent in 1948." Oklahoma, "Aside from regular cultivation equipment, the rotary hoe is being used more than tny othei weed control practice." Mississippi, "The rotary hoe Is widely used. Mississippi Introduced the cultivator mounted for early cotton culture." Texas, "The rotary hoe is the most widely used mechanical Implement and permits economic high speed operation." Texas county agents reported there were 26,804 tractors equlped with rotary hoes in 1653, compare* with only 8,966 in 1949. His report showed that Arizona and California farmers make little use of the rotary hoe. On the other hand the New Mexico, report said to part, "Rotary hoes are standard equipment on practically all the New Mexico cotton farms. Their main use is for breaking the crust to allow the cotton seedlings to come through." Burs Worth $9.00 A Ton J. B. Green of Leachville came in to ask how much potash there was in cotton hull ashes. My information is that cotton hull ashes contain 25 per cent potash. In other words 100 pounds of cotton hull ashes is worth one- half as much as 100 pounds of 50 percent muriate of potash. • Of course I think its worthwhile to distribute these ashes on potash deficient soils. Why don't more of you farmers haul 'these cotton burs from the gins and distribute them on your thin land? Cotton burs have averaged a return of $9.82 per ton in a 24 year test act the Oklahoma Experiment Station, that's a long time for any test and the results ought to be reliable. NOTICE IN THE PROBATE COURT OF CHICKASAWBA DISTRICT OF MISSISSIPPI COUNTY, ARKANSAS IN THE MATTER OF THE THE ESTATE OF No. ?Si? Mrs. Ruth Rlgglns, deceased. Last known address of decedent: Blytheville, Arkansas. Date of death: January 5, 1955. An Instrument dated April 25, 1952. was on the 13th day of January, 1955, admitted to probate as the last will of the above named decedent, and the undersigned has been appointed administrator with will annexed thereunder. A contest of the probate of the will can be effected only by filing a petition within the time provided by law. All persons having claims agnlnst the estate must exhibit them, duly verified, to the undersigned within six months from the date of the first publication of this notice, or they shall be forever barred and precluded from any benefit in the estate. This notice first published 14th day of January, 1955. JAMES TERRY. Administrator WELLS & PUMPS for Farm Crop Irrigation "Make It Rain Wit/i Pumps by Layne" Install Now and be sure of your Crop! We install 2 inch house wells FREE ESTIMATES — NO OBLIGATION! See or Call Frank Seay at Arkansas Well Co. Ph.3-4110 127 E. Main DELTA CAFE NOW OPEN FOR BREAKFAST At 6 A.M. Serving delicious hot biscuits PLATE LUNCHES 651 SPECIAL PRICES ON STEAKS AND CHICKEN DELTA CAFE AND TOURIST COURTS 357 So. Division Ph. 3-6934 "HOGS OF TOMORROW" — George Pendergast, animal husbandry from Terre Haute, Ind., shows his hybrid hog, raised on antibiotic feeds, in Chicago, 111. The animals are fed terramy- cin and selected foods which supposedly make them very fat and clean. In the pen are J. J. Powers and John McKeen, both connected with the farm raising these hogs. PROPOSED BUDGET OF EXPENDITURES TOGETHER WITH TAX LEVY FOR FISCAL YEAR BEGINNING JULY 1, 1956, TO AND INCLUDING JUNE 30, 1957 The Board of Directors of Gosnell School District No. 6 of Mississippi County, Arkansas, in compliance with the requirements of Act 403 of 1951 and of Amendment 40 to the Constitution of the State of Arkansas, have prepared, approved, and hereby make public the proposed budget of expenditures together with the tax rate as follows: General Control. $4,000.00; Instruction, $85,375.00; Operation of School Buildings, $10,000.00; Maintenance of School Plant and Equipment, $5,000.00; Auxiliary Agencies (including transportation), $8,500.00; Fixed Charges, $3,500.- oo; Capital Outlay, $18,500.00; Debt Service, $5,000.00. To provide for the foregoing proposed budget of expenditures the Board of Directors proposes a tax levy of 40 mills. This tax levy Includes the present continuing levy for the retirement of present Indebtedness. GIVEN this 13th day of January, 1955. BOARD OF DIEECTORS, Gosnell School District No. 8 of Mississippi County, Arkansas C. A. MOODY, President 6. R. LEDBETTER, Secretary. P. 0. Box No. 289 Blytheville, Arkansas. Marcus Evrard, Attorney for Administrator. PROPOSED BUDGET OF EXPENDITURES TOGETHER WITH TAX LEVY FOR FISCAL YEAR BEGINNING JULY 1, 1956, TO AND INCLUDING JUNE 30, 1857 The Board of Directors of Shawnee School District No. 10 of Mississippi County, Arkansas, in compliance with the requirements of Act 403 of 1951 and of Amendment 40 to the Constitution of the State of Arkansas, have prepared, approved, and hereby make public the proposed budget of expenditures together with the tax rate as follows: General Control, $3,000.00; Instruction, $80,000.00; Operation of School Buildings, $10,000.00; Maintenance of School Plant and Equipment, $6,000.00; Auxiliary Agencies (including transportation), $17,000.00; Fixed Charges, $2,000.00; Capital Outlay, $16,500,00; Debt Service, $10,000.00. To provide for the foregoing proposed budget of expenditures the Board of Directors proposes a tax levy of 50 mills. This tax levy Includes the present continuing levy for the retirement of present indebtedness. GIVEN this 5th day of January, 1955. BOARD OF DIRECTORS, Shawnee School District No. 10 of Mississippi County, Arkansas LESLIE E. SPECK, SR., President. H. C. WOODS, Secretary Read Courier News Classified Ads. You're Invited to See and Try NOV/ Better Farming — More Profit For You Tune in Hit National Farm and Horn* Hour — Iv-ry Saturday — NIC ( rULIS-CHflLMERS ) V SAUS AND SEHVICf / BYRUM IMPLEMENT, Hardware, & Seed Company Blyiheville, Ark. Ph. 3-4404 American Electric Supply, Inc. WHOLESALE DISTRIBUTORS OF Electrical Supplies & Construction Materials Rear 213-215 W. Walnut — Blythevillc— PO. 3-8353 101-106 E. Wore.— Joneslwro— WE .1-5385 I.AMI'S, ,4S^. CONDUIT SERVICE MfffK WIRING EQUIPMENT ^tfiJF DEVICES If jour home or tmxlnfM honae If not adequately wired, •ce rnur llcenwd tlcctrlcul contractor. Farrowing Care ill Pay Off Saving Thost Pigs Will Put Extra Money in Pocket Saving as many pigs as possible per litter is just good swine management and means extra money in a farmer's pocket, says Leland Tribble of the University of Missouri animal husbandry department. Since 80 to 90 percent of the death losses in young pigs occur within three to four days after farrowing, special attention ,to a sow and litter during this period pays off. Tribble lists nine steps that long producers can follow to reduce death losses in young pigs. They are as follows. One—keep a breeding record on each sow to know when she is due to farrow. Then, put her in the farrowing pen around HO days after breeding as most sows will farrow by 1U days. Two—feed the sow a laxative ration a few days before and a few days after farrowing. 'This can be done by replacing the regular ration with one containing one-half bran or other bulky feed. Three—clean out the farrowing pen and bed it lightly before housing the sow. Pour—check the guard rails. If any are broken, repair or replace them. In cold weather, install heat lamps or brooders—the greatest losses in young pigs are from crushing and chilling. Five—be on'hand when the sow farrows or use a good farrowing crate. Six—<lry pigs and see that they get some of the sow's first milk. Seven—watch the sow and pigs the first few days to make sure the pigs are getting a good sup. ply of milk. Even litters among sows farrowing at the same time. Eight—if pigs are farrowed on wooden or concrete floors, give New Bulletin Discusses Irrigation Farmers can assure themselves of i feed supply and crop production during periods of rainfall deficiency by using irrigation, says R. P. Beasley, agricultural engineer »t the University of Missouri tnd author of a bulletin, "Farm Irrigation Systems," recently published by the College of Agriculture »t the University. However, before planning to irrigate, a farmer should Investigate the quantity and quality of water 'available on his farm and be sure that sufficient labor can be provided without Interfering with other farm work, Beasley points out. The amount of investment needed is another point to coastder. To insure maximum returns from irrigation, it is essential that the soil fertility be high, that adapted and suitable crop varieties be used and the best cultural practices be follov/2d. The ideal soil for irrigation has a deep, permeable, highly fertile topsoil, which absorbs water rapidly and has a large waterholding capacity. However, such soils are better able to withstand drouth. Shallow, sandy soils have l low water-holding capacity. They are usually low in fertility and are more subject to drouth damage, Beasley says. Thus, sandy soils need to be irrigated more frequently and require more fertilizer. Heavy soils do not absorb water as readily as light-textured soils. It may be difficult to maintain their physical condition under continual irrigation. Establishing and maintaining, high fertility and good tilth must be part of every successful irrigation program. In humid regions there ie always the possibility of rain occurring soon after irrigations, often in large amounts and high intensities. The effect of such additional moisture on crops, erosion and leaching must not be overlooked. These and other factors to be coasidered in the selection and design of an Irrigation system are discussed in the bulletin. A copy may be secured from loctl county them some clean sod to prevent anemia. Nine—start the pigs on a good creep ration seven to. ten days after farrowing. agents' offices or by writing t* ttw Mailing Room, 11 Mumlord Hall, Columbia, Mo., and asking for A copy of Bulletin 638, "Farm Irrigation 6y«tems." MASSEY-H ARRIS SPECIALIZED SERVICE INTO YOUR FARM EQUIPMENT! Peppy . .. quick responding tools save time and let you do a better job. If your equipment is in smooth running order, you make more money . . . you move along at a good clip finishing more work at lest cost. That's just the target our Specialized Service is aimed at—to help you make more money with your farm equipment. Our service shop is equipped to handle your machinery problems right now. Experienced mechanics will restore the pep and power to your farm tools ... put them on a paying basis. Only genuine repair parts are used. See UB now . . . get your equipment ready for the busy season ahead. 61-IMPLEMENT CO. "The Farmer's Home of Satisfaction" N. HIGHWAY 61 PH. 2-2141 YOUR M A S S E Y - H A R R I S DEALER A MISER ON FUEL" THE 1955 JOHN DEERE DIESEL holds the world's record for economy of operation! • The Diesel "70" breaks every .record on fuel economy! • The Diesel "70" develops more horsepower than Gas operated Tractors! • The Diesel "70" has power steering as optional equipment! • If you want horsepower and economy—the Diesel "70" is your Tractor! Your John Deere Dealer has It Now! SEE IT TODAY at rr TRACTOR HEADACHES" You'll never have to put up with again 1 The manual effort required to fight the steering wheel for hours at a time. 2 The muscle work of wrestling with levers or tugging 1 on ropes to raise and lower equipment by hand. 3 The inconvenience of constantly shifting and clutching to operate the power shaft or the hydraulic system. 4 The lifting strains and time-consuming chore of changing heavy integral tools. 5 The hammering, lugging, and reversing of wheels to change rear wheel spacing. 6 The pounding you take from a rough-riding tractor. 7 The cramped feeling that comes frofn driving a tractor that restricts your view and your position at the wheel. ; iOO° . ^n*" 'no* Hoi** ' * ' d<*. °" MISSCO IMPLEMENT CO. S. Highway 61 PH. 34434

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