The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on January 13, 1955 · Page 6
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 6

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Blytheville, Arkansas
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Thursday, January 13, 1955
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Page 6
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PAGE SIX BLYTHEVILLE (ARK.) COURIER NEWS Point Stingy San Francisco Racks Up 11th Win of Year 6 Football Rule Changes Okayed ; Chang* Is Made in Substitution Rule; 'Hideouts' Outlawed NEW YORK (IP}— Football will be more honest next fall—on the field at least—if the wishes of the NCAA Rules 'Committee are respected: Winding up 214 days of deliberations, the committee yesterday adopted six changes in the rules •nd made two strong appeals to coaches for more honest and careful observance of other important rulet. Unfair Deception Hit Two of the three rules changes were designed to prevent unfair deception on offense—the outlawing of the "hideout" play and a new proviso concerning plays where t middle lineman (tackle, guard or center) becomes eligible to receive forward passes. Another will help keep the defense "honest" by providing more opportunities for fake place kicks. The most important change was in the substitution rule—a short itep backward from the "no platoon" rult adopted two years ago. Segment Eliminated This will permit any player who •tarts a quarter to leave the game »nd re-enter once during that quarter. Collaterally, the four-minute* "segment" in'the second and fourth quarters was eliminated. But the committee decided not io try this time to solve two of its biggest headaches—false starts and tlbow blocks—by changing the rules. Instead, a strong appeal will be addressed to officials and commissioners for stricter enforcement of the rules and to coaches to observe them. It was the second straight year the committee had declined to change the rule on false starts tfter a hullabaloo over "sucker thifU" in the line. Basketball Scores By The Associated Press " lasalle 88, Muhlcnberg 79. Colgate 90, Army 12. ' 'Penn State 107, Syracuse 85. ' ' Fordham 71, Columbia 68. Villanova 97, Kings (Pal) 71. Boston College 65, Providence 40. George Washington 79, William and Mary 65. Navy 90, Franklin-Marshall 50., Duke 82, South Carolina 64. \ Marquette 82, Louisville 78. Middle Tenn. 84, Western Kentucky 77. Houston 75, Oklahoma City 63. Arkansas A&M 79, Hendrix 68. San Francisco 54, Santa Clara 44. St. Marys (Calif.) 58, College ol Pacific 56. Cincinnati 85, Dayton 78. Toledo 75, Bowling Green 69. Southwest Missouri 72, Missouri Mines 56. Illinois College 57, Culver-Stockton 41. Pittsburg (Kan.) 68, St. Benedict's (Kan.) 57. Evansville 74, Washington (St. Louis) 60. Defense-Minded Dons Have Suffered But One Setback By ED WILKB The Anoolated Press While college basketball rambles along in what may be its most prolific scoring season — with 100-plus game totals popping up all over — the lads who bump into San Francisco are having a tough time getting 50 points. And that stingy treatment may lead the Dons into the NCAA title tournament as 'an at-large representative. The Dons, ranked fifth in this week's Associated Press poll, shackled Santa Clara by a 54-44 count last night for their llth victory in 12 games and their ninth straight. The lean Santa Clara point production cnopped San Francisco's nation leading team defense average to a scant 47.9 allowance a game. San Francisco, which lost to UCLA 47-40 but reversed it with a 56-44 triumph, went into a seven- minute stall against Santa Clara at the close of the California Basketball Assn. game. Kenny Sears— who has starred for Santa Clara in three NCAA playoffs—was high with 17 points. Only four other teams ranked among' the nation's top 20 were in action—and two of them were knocked off. LaSalle (No. 4) had a rough second half, but finally defeated Mulhenberg 88-79, while George Washington (No. 8) was sending William and Mary to its first Southern Conference defeat 79-65 with Corky Devlin canning 20 points for ..the Colonials. Thrice-beaten Cincinnati trounce Dayton (No. 12) 85-78 and Louisville, tied for 20th with Auburn dropped a home court decision to remarkable Marquette 82-78. It was Marquette's 12th straight victory after an opening defeat. The LaSalle game had a couple of surprises. First, the Mules moved ahead of the Explorers early in the second half and only zone defense and some clutch shooting by Alonzo Lewis regained the lead for LaSalle. The second surprise was that Lewis, with 24 points, took the scoring honors away from All America Tom Gola who scored 23 a-.ong with teammate Charlie Singley for LaSalle. Duke's Ron Mayer was stopped with seven points before foulinf out midway in the second half, but substitute forward Kerky Lamley hit for 20 as th Boue Devils defeated South Carolina 82-64 in an Atlantic Coast Conference game. Penn State, a newcomer to the nation's leading offease statistics at the No. 10 spots, clobbered Syracuse . 107-85. * * * High-Scoring Furman Is Top Offensive Team NEW YORK (AP) — Furman, an old hand at high scoring team assaults, vaulted into the lead this week in offense statistics among the nation's major college basketall teams. Cards to Remove Pavilion Screen ST. LOUIS M — Stan (The Man) Musial, St. Louis Cardinals' veteran outfielder who already owns most of baseball's batting honors, may find the key to an elusive home run crown through a bit of carpentry work on Busch Stadium. The club decided yesterday to NOTICE OF ELECTION SUBMITTING TO THE VOTERS OF THE TOWN OF DELL, ARKANSAS, THE QUESTION OF ISSUING GAS TRANSMISSION AND DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM REVENUE CONSTRUCTION BONDS FOR THE PURPOSE OF CONSTRUCTING GAS TRANSMISSION LINES AND A DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM FOR NATURAL GAS TO SERVE THE TOWN OF DELL, ARKANSAS Notice is hereby given that a special election will be held in the Town of Dell, Arkansas on the 1st day of February, 1955 at which there will be submitted to the electors the question of issuing $27,000 in negotiable gas transmission and distribution system revenue construction bonds. The bonds Will be dated January 1, 1955, will bear interest at a rate to be determined by the Town Council, payable semi-annually and will mature on January 1 of each year as follows, but will be callable for payment prior to maturity on such terms as the Town may specify in the contract of sale: $500 in each of the years 1957, 1958 and 1959 $1,000 in each of the years 1960, 1961, 1962 and 1963 $1,500 in each of the years 1964, 1965, 1966, 1967, 1968 and 1969 32,000 in each of the years 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973 and 1974 $2,500 in 1975 The bonds will be sold with the privilege of conversion to an Issue bearing a lower rate or rates of interest, provided that the conversion be in accordance with the Universal Bond Values Tables and such that the City shall receive no less and pay no more than it Would receive and pay if the bonds were not converted. It is contemplated that in the event a majority vote is cast in Two 100-point-plus sprees—one an all-time 'single game recond — sent Furman spiraling Into first place in pursuit of its third straight scoring title. Only one other major college—the rampant Rhode Island teams from 1936 through 1949—ever has succeeded in pulling off the triple. Furman's 164-67 mauling of the Citadel capped the Paladins' rise to the No. 1 spot with a 99.2 average for 10 games through Tuesday. Furman also had a 102-85 trouncing of Ersldne in the records through the streak—as well as a 105-81 reversal by North Carolina State which helped boost the Wolfpack, No. 2 team in this week's Associated Press poll, from 17th to 7th. Topped Record The romp against the Citadel topped Furman's own one-game record of 149 against Newberry last season and the Paladins' 61 field goals fell just shy of the record 63 mance. In the 1953-54 perfor- running up the one- take down the screen in front of j favor of the issuance of the bonds the right field pavilion — a move which cuts 25 feet 2 inches off the distance needed for r. homer. The screen, which since 1930 has been known as a pitcher's friend, extends from the right field foul line 156 feet toward center field. A batter, in the past, had to loft the ball over the screen to the pavilion roof, which is 36 feet 8 inches above ground level. Now only an ll-foot-6-inch concrete wall stands between southpaw sluggers such as Musial and a quick trip around the basepaths. Pro Basketball Results By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Minneapolis 102, Rochester 88 that the Town will lease the transmission lines and distribution system to Arkansas-Missouri Power Company, which lease will grant to Arkansas-Missouri Power Company an option to purchase the said transmission lines and distribution system. Only qualified electors of the Town ot Dell, Arkansas will, have the right to vote and the voters may vote either for or against the issuance of the bonds. The election will be held between the hours of 8:00 o'clock a.m. and 6:30 o'clock p.m. at the following polling place in the Town of Dell, Arkansas: Del! Gin Company Officft Given this 16th day of December, 1954. J. O. DOBBS, Mayor. 12/30-1/6-13-20 game mark, Furman scored 84 points in the first half—also a major collegiate record for half a game. Connecticut '93.8) held on to second place behind Furman In the scoring statistics compiled by the NCAA .service bureau while Marshall (92.0) fell from first to third. San Francisco not only retained its team defense lead, but improved on it—allowing 11 foes a bare 48.3 points a game, the best record at this stage since 1952. The Dons were almost air-tight in their only game of the week, holding San Jose State to 30 points —the lowest score any team has been held to this season. Oregon State,is the runnerup with a 52.0 opponent average and Oklahoma A&M is third at 54.0. Colorado of the Big Seven and Tulsa, a member of the Missouri Valley Conference also movd into the top 10 on defense. Colorado, ranked No. 6 has given up an average of 57.2 points per game and Tulsa, No. 10 has allowed its opponents an average of 59. DELTA CAFE NOW OPEN FOR BREAKFAST At 6 A.M. Serving delicious hot biscuits LUNCHiS SPECIAL PRICES ON STEAKS AND CHICKEN DELTA CAFE AND TOURIST COURTS 357 So. Division Ph. 3-6914 NOTICE! Change in Store Hours Effective immediately we will observe the following hours: 8 A.M. to 6 P.M. Monday thru Friday 8 A.M. to 9 P.M. Saturday Firestone 0. 0. Hardawoy SHAWNEE GIRLS — Shown here is Coach Carl Trussell's Shawnee girls basketball team which Is seeking high laurels in the Mississippi County race this season. Members ,of the squad are: front row (left to right) Sue Wilson, manager, Marion Ben- nett, Barbara Henning, Lois Ann Edlns, Mary Sue Bennett. Martha Jones, and Linda Felts, manager. Second row — Coach Trussell, Mary Oliver, Jo Jones, Joyce Bennett, Alice Ashburn and Betty Simpson. THURSDAY, JANUARY 18, 19M Mickey Owens' Career Ends 'Goat' of 1941 World Series Is Released By Boston Red Sox BOSTON W— One of tht mot* colorful and varied c«reera M in active player has ended with th» unconditional release of catcher Arnold Malcolm Mickey Owen by tht Boston Red Sox. However, the Sox have given Mickey a contract as coach for tht 1955 season with the parent club. Owens thus concludes 20 ye»r» as a player in professional baw- ball. He probably will be;WorWn» in the Boston bull pen when tht season opens. Two Incident* The 39-year-old veteran, a steady, workmanlike performer, spent much of his time trying to live down two incidents in his career the Jump to the Mexican League and the dropped third strike in the 1941 World Series. In the '41 classic, Owen, Brooklyn's regular catcher, dropped a third strike tossed by pitcher Hugh Casey past Tommy Henrich of the New York Yankees. Henrich reached base play aud although the Dodgers held the lead at the time the Yanks went in to capture the game and tht series. Came up With Cards Owen reached the major leagues with the St. Louis Cardinals in The highlight of Owen's last ao- 1937. tive season was a 105th inning grand slam homer that beat Baltimore 9.-7. Commented Sox Gen. Mgr. Jot Cornin: "If he gets the kids to hustle lllst he hustles he'll be a tucceii." What's happened to the old home ties? They aren't what they used to be. Today twenty million women in the U. S. work In an office or an industry. One out of every three women Is gainfully employed! Almost ten million married women; more than five million single girls; and over four million widowed, divorced, and separated women work. Twenty million women is a big market in anybody's sales plans. , Yet these twenty million women can't hear or see a soap opera from morning to night! But they can be reached through their dally newspaper. And are reached—because 95% of the women in America read a daily newspaper some time during the day. When they will, where they will. As for advertising—a survey taken at the time of New York's newspaper strike disclosed that the item women missed most in the newspaper was the advertising. m II So if you want to tell these women about your product, tell them, and sell them, and keep them sold... in the medium you know they'll read—The Daily Newspaper. All buiineM in local...and so are all newspapers! This messaflc prepared by BUREAU OF ADVERTISING, American Newspaper Publishers Association, and published in the interests of fuller understanding of newspapers by BL.YTHKVIU.iK COURIER NEWS

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