The Atlanta Constitution from Atlanta, Georgia on July 24, 2003 · C4
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The Atlanta Constitution from Atlanta, Georgia · C4

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Atlanta, Georgia
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Thursday, July 24, 2003
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C4
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770-493-1229 Northlake Tower Festival Shopping Center Mon- Fri 10-6 • Sat 10-5 • Closed Sunday 3983 LaVista Rd. at I-285 exit 37 store 188 Wife Wanted! The Necchi company has released for sale to the public a limited quantity of new school machines. HEAVY DUTY, MADE OF METAL, sews straight zig-zag, tri overlook, feather, stretch, blind hem plus built-in-button- holder, twin needle sewing and more! Sews Light weight fabrics to canvas, denim and even leather. Color coded sewing instruction at a glance! Your price with this ad- $ 169. Without this ad- $ 499. New 2003 Necchi Sewing Machines in Boxes A-1 SEWING MACHINE CO. Open Daily 4 Days Only!!! www.a-1sewing.com INSURANCE DEPOT Kaiser Permanente Authorized Agents AgeMale Rates available for ages 0-64 , vary for different ages or family configurations. Applicants subject to medical review. 20-24 25-29 30-34 35-39 • Preventive care. • Prescription coverage. • Hospitalization. (404) 636-8881 800-326-8881 Out Of Atlanta Female $76 $89 $98 $110 $139 $167 $202 Call for a FREE Quote or $110 Get an INSTANT quote at eInsuranceDepot.com Health plans that offer: Search online today: More than 1015 ads from 530 advertisers . Plus, find great shopping trends and tips. 6214099A ajc.com ajc.com/buyersedge www.sweetland-outdoor.com Roswell 770-587-9565 Dawsonville 706-216-7770 Alpharetta 770-569-7772 Creative Playthings “Creating Fun Since 1951" SALE! Up to 40% Off MSRP Take an Additional 10% Off Swing Sets with this ad good through 7/31/03. By MARCIA LANGHENRY mlanghenry@ajc.com Butch Fox never saw it so windy at Wendy’s. The district manager for the fast-food chain said high winds during Tuesday’s thunderstorms, which forecasters said were clocked as high as 70 mph in some spots, bent aluminum roof flashing in the air 10 feet at the restaurant on McFarland Road in Forsyth County. “It was the weirdest thing I ever saw,” Fox said Wednesday, after the roof was repaired and parts ordered for signs damaged Tuesday by thunderstorms that left metro residents and emergency crews cleaning up, powering up and feeling lucky. Among them were police and firefighters in Alpharetta. Alpharetta’s police station was back on regular power after running on generators part of Tuesday, while fire officials had the roof patched at the station on Webb Bridge Road after a tree fell on it. It was not clear whether the station’s roof would need to be replaced, Fire Department Capt. Jim Cheatham said. Firefighters who were at the station during the storm said the wind was like nothing they had ever seen. It doubled trees to the ground, he said. Georgia Power said 3,000 employees worked through the night to restore power to 103,000 customers. “Anytime there’s any lightning or winds that can topple trees down on lines, that’s an issue,” Georgia Power spokeswoman Amoi Geter said. Wind damage from severe thunderstorms peaks in Georgia in July, according to the National Weather Service. The winds in Tuesday’s storms rivaled those of a weak tornado, but the Weather Service said no funnel clouds were confirmed. Hail the size of quarters was reported from Canton to Carrollton and Alpharetta to Oakwood, as the storm swept from Tennessee to metro Atlanta and northeast Georgia. In Marietta, a pregnant woman was taken to a hospital as a precaution after the car in which she was riding was hit by a falling tree, police Officer Brian Marshall said. Two women escaped injury in Decatur when a tree fell on the car in which they were sitting and landed between them. A few homes in a subdivision east of Woodstock in Cherokee County sustained light to moderate roof or deck damage from falling trees. ANDY SHARP / Staff Hoyt Davis , 75, looks over a large pecan tree that fell near his home on Stewart Avenue in MariettaTuesday afternoon. The toppled tree blocked traffic and knocked down power lines. Wind came, went, leaving many to clean up, power up By DAVID PENDERED dpendered@ajc.com Georgia’s motor fuel tax should be raised and the state Constitution amended to allow the new funds to pay for sidewalks, buses, passenger trains and other transit measures, a state senator who serves on a MARTA advisory panel said Wednesday. Sen. Liane Levetan (D- DeKalb) said a hike of up to 5 cents a gallon could be used to build what she calls a “seamless transportation system.” She envisions a metro Atlanta resident driving to a MARTA station and riding a train that would connect with a passenger rail line linked to other parts of the state. The gas tax is a constant target in most conversations about funding pedestrian- friendly transportation. It’s almost sacred — it has not been changed since 1971, when it was raised to 7.5 cents a gallon. That’s the lowest motor fuel tax in the country, and the state Constitution says it can be used only for roads and bridges. Another member of the panel said Levetan’s proposal would be dead on arrival at the state Capitol. David Chesnut, a lawyer from DeKalb who helped create the current MARTA rail system, said the only hope for winning political support for any state funding of mass transit is to frame the issue so that rural lawmakers will endorse it. Chesnut recommended raising the gas tax 5 cents a gallon. His plan is to use the revenues to subsidize the state’s general fund to pay off money borrowed for roads built through the Governor’s Road Improvement Program. That would free about $135 million a year for transit. The funding debate was the highlight of a meeting called to approve the so-called Blue Ribbon Panel’s recommendations for fixing MARTA’s economic woes. The panel did not include either Levetan’s or Chesnut’s proposals in their report. Instead, members adopted recommendations that propose several alternatives for improving mass transit in metro Atlanta. Atlanta attorney Clay Long, a longtime civic volunteer, said the panel’s job was to look at the existing mass transit system and suggest broad ways to improve it. “Our job is to get a discussion going and let it go where it goes,” Long said. “It would be premature to pick one [recommendation]. I want to leave flexibility and let the political process work.” The panel’s report is to be presented to MARTA’s board of directors Aug. 4. The board will determine how to proceed in building support for any changes. The report includes figures that may explain some reasons that MARTA ridership is declining. More jobs are being created outside the two counties served by MARTA. In the 10- county metro area, the proportion of jobs in Fulton and DeKalb has decreased 18.7 percent between 1980 and 1999. Lawmaker: Gas tax should fund transit RMAIN0724OC4FMAIN0724OC4 4 Star 4C 4C RR RR *CNZ24OC004CY* *CNZ24OC004CY* *CNZ24OC004MA* *CNZ24OC004MA* *CNZ24OC004YE* *CNZ24OC004YE* *CNZ24OC004KB* *CNZ24OC004KB* BlueRedYellowBlack Blue RedYellowBlack C4 Thursday, July 24, 2003 / The Atlanta Journal-Constitution 4 ➤ Continued from C1 _____________________________________________________________________________________ Hartsfield: Vendors’ contracts expired than two years ago on a jet fuel storage area at the airport, but it hasn’t paid anything, Diaz said. He said the city had had difficulty in appraising the property because it was so unusual, but was now moving to reach an interim agreement with Delta. That answer did not sit well with Willis. “It can’t take two years to work this out,” he said. “I find it unconscionable that for two years we have a carrier sitting on a piece of property and not paying us anything for the improvements.” Willis said Delta, Hartsfield’s biggest tenant, should have been paying something — even a minimal amount — until both sides could reach an agreement. Willis also expressed disbelief that seven rental car companies were operating at the airport under a lease agreement that expired in 1995. Former airport manager Angela Gittens extended the agreement, but the city’s law department determined that the extension was illegal, according to city documents. The airport has negotiated new agreements with the companies and expects to submit them to the City Council for approval in September. By BEN SMITH bsmith@ajc.com When a neighbor complained about heavy late night traffic at Tien- dra Demian’s Doraville home, police began watching the house. Now, Demian, 33, who starred in several of the “Emmanuelle” soft- core porn movies in the 1990s, is in the DeKalb County Jail, charged with working as a prostitute out of the basement of her home. Demian is being held on $1,500 bond on charges of illegal drug possession, providing masturbation to an undercover police officer and offering to perform other sexual acts for him for money. DeKalb police arrested Demian Tuesday night, five days after she allegedly offered sex to the undercover officer. Police also took Demian’s 13-year- old child into custody. The child, whom police say was neglected, is now in the custody of the state Department of Family and Children Services. As police led her to into court Wednesday, Demian told reporters she had been framed. She looked into television cameras and addressed her daughter. “I love you,” she said. “None of this is true. Don’t listen to them.” Before her court appearance, Damien was asked by a reporter if she had appeared in the “Emmanuelle” movies. She nodded yes. Police said Demian’s home on Amberly Court was insufficiently stocked with nutritious food and didn’t have hot water. Police said they also discovered a small stage with a dancer’s pole in the basement as well as less than a gram apiece of marijuana and meta-amphetamines. Several of Demian’s neighbors said they were surprised by the arrest. They said police reports that she was a neglectful mother and a prostitute didn’t fit their image of her. “We thought they were a little different, but nothing you could put your finger on,” said Madeline Price. “They were from California. She sold vitamins.” Price said Demian’s daughter often came to her house to play basketball with her sons, trade playing cards and play video games. Price called the girl “outgoing” and “friendly,” and said she appeared healthy. Price said she and Demian exchanged telephone numbers to keep tabs on each other’s children. Demian, who did not have a lawyer, spoke freely during her court appearance, often bursting into tears. She pleaded for a lesser bond, saying she was not a flight risk. She stared plaintively at one her of arresting officers and, breaking into tears, said, “I am not a bad person.” Tiendra Demian , who once acted in soft-core porn films, insisted that the allegations against her are false. Sometime actress accused of prostitution DeKalb home allegedly used as a brothel

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