Winfield Daily Courier from Winfield, Kansas on September 16, 1922 · 3
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Winfield Daily Courier from Winfield, Kansas · 3

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Winfield, Kansas
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Saturday, September 16, 1922
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3
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A i 1! The Winfield Daily Courier, Saturday, Sept. 16, 1922 Rafding In The Mahsud. Country Is An Active Vocation (Bv The Associated Press) VESHAWAIt, India. August 9. '-' The efforts qf poljce and military for-ces have not jet effected any perceptible decrease in the number of rrnv d raids In the northwestern frontier districts, which Occurred with un-'usual frequency during the past few months. A late reports tells of a bullet bat-1le between a party of police and a -raiding gang in the Bannu district The police, only eight in number, formed a detachment of a larger party which was searching in the Maidangl range of hills for outlaws known to be hiding there, This detached party was ambushed In a defile by the,, raiding gang and had two of its number killed aiftl its leader severely wounded almost at the first volley. " The remaining constables opened Are on their attackers at once, altho-wlthout cover ofvany sort. Later they withdrew, one by one, to some water holes about 190 yards away which afforded partial cover. Fron? this position they kept their opponents at bay for three hours. Finally, -when ammunition was nearly exhausted, the raiders, fearing the arrival of other parties of police and villagers, drew off, This enabled the police to recover the bodies, arms and equipment of their dead comrades, and to carry their wounded leader to the hospital at Issa Khel where Jie died the next day. The tale of sniping incidents, am-lushes and attacks on convoys, which the present occupation of th Mahsud cuontry has not terminated, Is a long one. Regular troops, with specialized training, have not yet teen able to overawe' the raiders or to prevent them from carrying out their long established vocation Thft raiders' chances of succes are greatly enhanced when thew descend to the plains after passing unmolested thru the area of military occupation. In the plains they have to fear only the opposition of partly armed villagers, and pursuit later by such forces of villagers on police as can be hurriedly mobilized. Every advantage lies on the side of the pursued. Additional forces of police and constabulary are now being drafted -Into the Dera Ismail Khan district, and all possible steps are being tak-ji to confine raiding gangs to their own country by adding to the risks they must take in coming across the lordef- - Famous Surgeon At White House To Try To Save Mrs. Harding PAGE THREE mi t. , - v L If ' . I fell! J , ' !- ; I j Government Is To : Open Famous Cave .- By fhe Associated Press) . BUTTE, Mont. Sept 14 Morrison Cavern, 45v miles southeast of here and said to have been discovered in ,1905 by George Morrison, has been placed under the supervision of th superintendent of national -park and renamed the Lewis and ClarK cave in honor of thfefamous explorers. . . , The. cavern has a. collection of stal-aetities and stalagmites which "tj said to have few rivals in the coutry, After the' proper lighting has been Installed the large" underground natural museum will be opened to the public. The mouth of the passage way to the cave is at the summit of a limestone cliff l.feOO feet above the Jefferson river; The main room of the cave is large enough to permit holding large meetings there. After making a record trip from Rochester, Minn., Dr. Charles Mayo, one of the world's most famous surgeons, is seen here iipon his arrival at the White House to which he has been summoned for a consultation as to the advisability of operating upon Mrs. Harding. Little Unemploy ment in Canada (By The Associated Press) OTTAWA, Can. Reports from all over Canada indicate little unemployment according to the government service at present, A scarcity of labor, it is said, isdeveloping in several lines of industry.- There has been some apprehension over the possibili ty of unemployment next winter, but the activity in industry at present has convinced those in close touch with the situation to think winter unemployment wilj be of such minor consequence as to furnish no problem. r. I'LaS' extension op A, V, I. Tlieis AVill Plan With Ponca City For Long Intciwbcui Line George Thels, Jr.,' and a delega tion of Wichita Board of Commerce directors "will make a trip to Ponca City September TO to discuss with representatives of that city the proposed extension of the Arkansas Valley Interurban from Wichita to Ponca City through Winfield and Arkansas City. Letters requesting the business men of Wichita to join the party have been sent out by the Board secretary. A number of. Tonca City business men went to Wichita several weekf ago for a similar conference and this will -be a return " call of men interested in the project. A hiahwayman in Massachusetts relieved a victim of his coat, vest, shoes and sock. Your money, your life or what have you MAKE YOUR MONEY WORK FOR YOU Money is the one thing which will work for you without demanding anything in return. A dollar, properly invested, will go on year after . year, returning to its owner its percentage of return, never shrinking, and always there ready to answer his call if he" feels the need. Care must, of course, be taken in the original investment. Municipal bonds form an ideal security into which" to put the dollars you wish to work for you. They are safe backed by all the wealth of -the communi-iies which issue them, with the additional safe-guard of state and national laws. They have a good rate of return. And they are readily convertible into cash if the investor finds need of his funds. Ask us for information. We will be glad to put our sales force at your disposal in making your investments. t Principal "ever tfieLoss of a Cent in. ipal or Interest to any Investor, -' ' A:v;rrm2a Fi INVtSIMfifll onulMH"-' 1 iT L lo" lenwm me uouse OPIE rIad' ILLUSTRATED BY R.H. LIVINGSTONE COPYRIGHT, TT)E BILL SYNDICATE, INC., SYNOPSIS vCTMPTErt I-Tie Um li thd tat eOi or early '70iand the icene a iteamboat on the MlBslsslppI river. All the trpei of the period are preient and the floating palace Is distinguished by merriment, dancing and gallantry. There are the customary drinking; and (ambllna; also. Virgil Drace, a young northern man, It on his way south on a mission of revenge. He meets an eccentric character In the person of one Liberty bliottle. who Is constantly tempting the goddeae of chance. They form a lingular compact. CHAPTER II.-Dvace gets his mind otf nls mission by entering into deck sports In whlcV he exhibits an unusual athletlo prowevs. Liberty ghottle Is again un iucicy at cards ana attempts a 0 negotiation with Drace. The latti ucky at cards and attempts a financial The latter. ing an opportunity to use Shottls, con fides to him that his mission is to find a certain ex-guerrllla, etepho la Vltte, who had murdered Drace's father. It Is his determination announced to his new chum, to hang Ia Vltte as high as Haman. Drace has become enamored of a mvsterlous beauty aboard the boat CHAPTER III.-The steamer reaches New Orleans, at that time In the some-wjiat turbulent throes of carpetbag government ShotUe becomes possess it of two tickets for the French ball, a great society event and proposes that Drace accompany him to the affair. The young men attend and Drace unexpectedly meets the girl who had fired his heart aboard the steamer. She Is accompanied by one Boyce, whose proprietary Interest indicates that he Is her fiance. Through stratagem Shottle learns that the name of the girl Is Nadlne la Vltte an, that her companion of the evening la the man who is seeking to marry her. CHAPTER IV. Drace passes an uneasy night torn by the suspicion that Nadlne Is the daughter of old Btepho la Vltte, now an admitted outlaw. Now, more than evei Is he resolved to ftni where the girl lives and to And Etepho. Draoe and Bhottle begin a search of the city. In one of - their nocturnal pilgrimages they come upon a mob Intent upon banging a poor wretch from 'the limb of a tree. It Is a typical carpetbag execution and aroused the resentment of an opposing mob of citizens. Drace takes a hand In the fight which starts and Is Instrumental In preventing the execution. From a window opposite the scene, he catches a glimpse of one he Is sure Is Nadlne. CHAPTER V. The escapade, the fight, the Interference with the execution get Drace and Shottle Into bad standing with the authorities, but instead of punishment are given until the next day to board a steamer bound north. Returning to the house where he thought be had glimpsed the (rtrl, Drace finds the place abandoned. Through Colonel' Josh, an emissary employed at the suggestion of Bhottle, he gets a faint clue in the discovery that a certain Frenchman, a wine dealer, Is reported to be an Intimate of Btepho la Vltte. There Is only a short time before the departure of the steamer when Drace arid Shottle go to call on the Frenchman. The latter Is too keen to be Inveigled Into giving up any Information, but Slmttle, spying around among the casks and bottles, especially the articles made up'-for shipment, makes an Important discovery. So as notito arouse the suspicions of the Frenchman, he casually draws Drace away from the flace and onto the steamer. On board he Informs Prace that one of the eases was addressed to Stepho la Vltte at Farmings Landing. Mississippi. It Is the next Istop below Bethpage's Landing and Col-Ponel Bethpage Is Liberty Shottle's uao- CHAPTER VI. Drace and Shottle ar received - with genuine hospitality by Colonel Bethpasre and. find the plantation and Its environs delightful. After a brief stay and a characteristic financial transaction with the colonel, Shottle goes away ostensibly on a business trip to Vicksburg, but In reality to seek Ms favorite form of amusement Drace makes the plantation his headquarters and from nieces of Information gathered rfrom various sources, becomes convinced that La Vltte has a haunt In great wood of cypress and a tangle of salt cedar, a sort of everglades, a marsh with hundreds of knoll islands rising here and there among the bayous. A shrewd old negro had told him that the outlaw tlved In a house built of periwinkle shells. Day after day Drace takes a canoe and goes farther and farther into the moss-hanging wilds. At his feet lies a rope, one end of It a hangman's noose. CHAPTER VII. Drace penetrates Into "the wilderness, dlscoversj'erlwlnkle House and finds Nadine alone. She Is much alarmed and warns him her father will shoot him. He makes love to her and to get him to go she agrees to meet him again the following Thursday. On his way home Drace Is accosted by three men who ask to be set across the river. They overpower him and bind him with ropes. Led by Tony they throw Drace Into an old cabin. Tony taunts Drace and avows his love for Nadlne, while the others collect fuel. Tony sets fire to the cabin and the three go off laugh ing. And then ins oonos are cut and with Nadine's help he gets safely out. She te.lls him how she was led to come to his rescue. CHAPTER VIII. Drace gets safely bark to the Bethpage place. The general writes him to accompany him to Natchez, where he is to address a teachers' meeting. At Natchez they go to old Tobe Mason's tavern, under the hill, a famous place. There they drink summer-grape wine, listen to "The Arkansaw Traveler," see the buck-and-wing dancers and hove a dinner of doves and flx-In's. Stepho la Vltte appears, Insults the General bv calling him a "Caroet- The General tens mm ne lies. bagger. Rifepho draws a dirk. Drace disarms Stepho, Who leaves, vowing vengeance. "You mtisf not" do that We must talk of other things." "Yes, but first let me tell you of ray dream." 1 "I do not like to hear dreams. We always forget them and make up something we did not dream. . . . But did you not tell me once?" "No, I don't think so. In my dream you touched my heart with a torch und set it afire." "But I would not do that. I would save you from the fire.- Ah, and Tony he has gone to the city, but when he comes back, we must watch close. . . . One time he tried to take my hand, and he said he would kiss me. And I say; 'That may be, Tony. You can kiss me because you stronger. But when you hnve, then you he 'dead.' And he knew that I speak what was to come." "We care nothing for him. Let hlrn keep out of my way. . . . And when I saw you at the ball, I knew that you were the girl with the torch. ... . I -v Ana ao you Know vnat i sum my- Tou worked so huti for klssP3 se f? Let me whisper Mo you." ycm must be 0re4 now m "There lsjio.one.te.8r.JL . 0ttiruessy. . , To Be Continued Monday). "I" buI3 : Toll uT6 To Tie riy wife. And Just then you turned about and looked at me." "But I did not see you," - J "Come, now, you; must have seen me." "Well, perhaps. But I did not say: 'I am to be his wife,' No, I did not say that. And it cannot be, Virgil." "But it. Is going toe, nil the same, and you know It. Why, what is all this universe for If that Is not to be? Why was this little Island casf up here? Why did the word ring forth : Let there be light'? It Is part of the plan of creation, and nothing can prevent It. ... I shall have to wait, but I" "Will wait a long time, Virgil. But we must not -tall: like that. Come let us forget such things." She put her spell on him, and he was a boy again. Hand In hand they walked about, pretending that the acre Island was miles and miles In extent. Time was a day-star shooting unseen across the sky, nhd then a heavy sentence fell upon hlra. It was time for him to go.' In the cane she stood with him where his canoe was moored. He held -her hand, drawing her toward him, but she took it away. "No no, you must not , . , Quick Virgil, you must go now. The sun Is low." CHAPTER X ' In the night, In. that hour of self-reproach which comes to us all, Virgil awoke In n rage with himself. He had been dreaming, had seen himself Infirm of purpose, without character. Back to Highland Bruce he traced his an cestry, and was he to be the first of his race to prove degenerate, to trample upon the memory of his father, to loll In stupid love, to give his soul to a creature far beneath him In birth and scliooling, a girl whose father had murdered 1 Out of bed he got, and bowed with .the weight of shame, walked the uneven "floor, for his slow steps .were doddering. "Caught . In an instant, a fly in a speck of Jelly, and jiave never been able to get free," he reproached himself. "Even Liberty-iBhottle, the slave of cards and dice, can see my weakness and must laligh at me. But by the God In Heaven it shall npt be. In this land there Js no law. I bring my own law with me, my oath, and a smile and a word of flattering love bade me put It aside, and I let it slip from me. Now I must redeem myself." He stood at the window. Gamecocks were crowing the dawn, a courageous challenge to all the world. No, there would be no weakening now. The sweetish comedy had been played. Swiftly he dressed himself, stole downstairs, out of the house, dowito the river. There was no boat, but no matter, he would walk to Willow Head. Realizing that It was yet too early for the execution of his grim purpose, he halted at a wayside place, ate breakfast and waited for the sun. Then not in Hurried haste, but deliberate in strength, he walked on to Willow Head, crossed over, found his neglected rope where, In a hollow stump In backsliding weakness he had hidden It, buttoned It beneath his coat and strode down Into the swamp. It was a long way to his canoe near the Muscadine Isle, and then a long phll to Periwinkle house, but there was time enough. Stepho would not" go away till Thursday. Ah, he would go away no more, for now on Tuesday he must settle with the spirit of Alfred Drace. - . x Mists hovered about, but the Island was in a blaze of light.-' Silently the canoe slit the Sjitln water. Silently he landed. Detennlnevengeance may pick Its way as softly as eager love; and In the cane, sharper of whisper now that the weather was cool, he made not a sound. Out Into the open he peered. No oue within sight. On the bark of the live oak were the dead flowers of yesterday. . There in the shade was the box that had served as table, once so prettily strewn with violets. In spite of his vow of vengeance and his. hatred of StepTio, these things caught nt Drace's heart, shook his fixed purpose of action. For many minutes he waited no sign of Stepho, of anyone. And then his blood leaped ; for soft hands suddenly . blinded hlio from behind, soft laughter bubbled over at his astoni.sltment. And dark thoughts -and dark purposes fled on the wind as he caught Nadine and hugged her close. , "Now for your punishment!" And he kissed her. "Oh, you must . not agnln . . . Virgil, I cannot like you when you are rude. . . . You must not!" "I don't wnnt you Just to like me." "You do not? Then I will try not to. Come and sit down, Virgil. Sir Robert Home May Head British Delegates On Debt To United States fir IB i Vv 1? 1 1 ' I ft XJJV i It is reported that Sir Robert Home may head the British debt delegation which will shortly leave London for the United States. The delegation will discuss the British debt to this coun try in the hope of arranging some set tlement. the world, who go by steamboat, electric tralu and automobiles. Kept as nearly In Its original state as possible .by the Ladles' Mount V ernnn Association it is a delight to all Am ericans. During Jul approximately 29,000 persons Wisited Mount Vernon and during the fiscal year admisions numbered 236,000. A 25-cent entrance fee helps to keen the estate in first-class condition. The house where Abraham Lin coln died, located onnoslte Ford's Theater at 516 Tenth Street, North west, this city, Is another-shrine visited by many tourists It was bought by the United States in IS 96 for $30,000. TO SAVE AVKSLEY. Local Methodists To Help Devise llescue'of Hospital. Four represent iil a .hoti'is-.' from the Winfleb1 'listvlct. w . L. George of Winfield. f. E. '.Vav-.ir of Winfield, G. B. OKlrord o' A ''Inn Pas City and" J. E. C;e cf Wellington, will attend a conference at Wichita Monday afternoon to deal with the Wesley Hospital situation. Three hundred Methodists, each subscribing $1,000 Is a plan suggested by a member of the Wichita Area staff that will save the Institution to the Southwest Kansas Conference. This plan Is one which probably will lo adopted. Dr. L. M, Tilpley, superintendent of Wesley Hospital, said yesterday the plan Is to be carefully considered and if adopted will put the hospital -on a Bound financial basis. Such a plan will also save thtit Institution permanently for the Methodists, ho added.- When the $300,000 Is subscribed, those contributing t.o. the cam:o will be given a mortgage on the hospital. This will moan that We?lcy will still be in the hands n( those who have helped build ar f.ipi'Oit the Wichita institution. It h t'-.e relief ot a large number of th :-"" 'io know of the plan that it vv!"' lo successfully carried out. . Those who are to attend the conference next Monday aud' vil- a'd In making the final decision are: Lollop Ernest L. Waldorf, Pr. D. McCoimick, Wichita District; C. D. Hestwood, Dodge City, District; S. M. "nn Cleve. Liberal District; JL L. George, "Winfield District. Besides these there will be one minister and two laymen from each of the six districts present at the Monday meeting. . Dr. Riley said the conference will' likely be held in the hospital building. " '' , Wanted: Courier. -Clean cotton rags. The Tourists In Wash- ' ington Pay Homage 1 To National Heroes (By The Associated Preps) WASHINGTON, Sept. 15 Homage to Washington and Lincoln is being shown by more than 1,000,000 peo ple a year. ' Washigton's home. Mount Vernon, the mecca of virtual ly all Americans and foreigners who come to Washington, is being rival-Jed as a. shrine by the beautiful Lincoln Memorial, while the Washington Mdnume-.it is the most popular of the three shrines. . Visitors numbering 34,112 went during July to the top of the Washington Monument, conveniently located a few hundred yards south of the White House. More than one-fifth of them clambered up the 898 steps in order to see the memorial tablets on the various landings inside the shaft. The remainder lode to the top in the electric elevator which has a capacity of 35 persons. More than 5,250,000 people have visited the top of the monument since it was opened for observation nur- poses October 9, ,1888. No entrance fee is charged. The Lincoln Memorial, recently completed and opened to the public, was visited by 31,383. persons during July. Located in Totomac Tark directly- west of the..- Washington Monument it is rather inaccessible for pedestrians; visitors usually go there "by automobile. On a recent Sunday 2,000 persons were recorded as entering the great building. It is rapidly becoming a shrine for tour ists. No entrance fee is charged. General George Washington's old home at 'Mount Vernon on the J'oto-niac river in Virginia, '16 miles' from Washington, long has been the niec es of nilerinis' from evpry part of New Accounts may be opened at this bank with the sum of one dollar. An officer of the bank will handle your initial deposit, and carefully explain to you any procedure that you may want -to know about such as making deposits by mail, withdrawing all or part of your money, and will suggest plans and methods for helping you to save. i f'his is part of our regular service to you as a depositor, and, in-addition, we pay 4 interest." Cowley County Natl Bank mm', ,0 ; .TV?, -Of HUMPHREY 1 " ' : There ia a Size and Style of Radiantfire. to Meet Every Requirement. Sea the Attractive DesignsinOur Showroom Better Than a Furnace for Fall and Spring Furnace heat for the cool days of Fall and Spring is an unnecessary expense.. Install a Radiantfire in your fireplace. This marvelous development in gas heating burns for hours at the cost of a shovelful of coal. Heats by a new principle Radiant Rays that send, forth heat rays directly into the room Pure, odorless heat always available and as cheerful as a flood of sunshine. Investigatetthis wonderful invention at once. The Winfield Natural Gas Company IS L 1 r ....

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