The Billings Gazette from Billings, Montana on November 22, 1970 · 41
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The Billings Gazette from Billings, Montana · 41

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Billings, Montana
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Sunday, November 22, 1970
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41
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"1 V'(li IlWi' j Sunday, November 22, 1970 Morning Edition TA Student Teacher Still Missing MISSOULA (AP) - Western Montana law officers are reporting no progress in the search for Dorothy Freeman, the 26-year-old University of Montana student teacher who failed to return to her job in Hamilton Sept. 8. Despite several reports that she was seen in September four times, Missoula County authorities said Friday a ground and air search and a nationwide police teletype alert have turned up trace of the woman or her 1960 dark green Ford. Mrs. Orville Grassdock of Fairfield described her sister-in-law as a quiet, reserved woman who decided to go college in 1968 after learning her husband, stationed in Thailand for the Air Force, wanted a divorce. Miss Freeman, 5-8 and weighing 150 pounds, was beginning her third year of study at UM. She had previously studied business in Great Falls. Authorities said Miss Free-i man had short brown hair, blue' eyes and fair complexion. J ) LMOW SHOWING! ki am firrt show lfVftV 5 30. Opt fri., Si. I-l Is. ly l "iytor! 7Z, ion l ieaioa f-'Hit V"i n FREE gallon of gas por car. Run your own car heator. 1 F 4 Swa... . v JE1 . D -W OF TKE J& COLOR!.) S33,b1 1 mm mm mm- rChastify'l v - .Alia A Tough Choice Choosing a future job is a perplex- Montana College. The girls, all ing task as School girls occupation these Roberts High learn as they study information during sophomores, are from left Joni Duke, Sandy Hamburg and Marilyn DeVries. An estimated ' 200 Saturday's Zonta Club sponsored girls braved slick roads and cold career conference at Eastern weather to attend the conference. I SKATELAND I SAT. & SUN. MAT. 1 1:30-4:00 p.m. 1 I 75e 8 U Bring the children for 2V4 H B hours of well supervised fun. H H Beginners welcome. H I 2228 Grand Ave. 1 Farmers Elect Greybull Rancher Pj if 'm ENDS SUNDAY Open Show 7.00 7-tn Ph. 252-1322 DOWN A HELL-RUN OF HATE rode the...yrmfmrn PLUS THE BULLET-RIDDLED SAGA OF CHARLES PRETTY-BOY' FLOYD gp33 colors WARM IN-CAR HEATERS CODY (AP) - A Greybull rancher, David A. Flitner, 37, was elected president of the 8,000-member Wyoming Farm Bureau Federation Friday in a three-way contest at the organization's 51st meeting. Flitner defeated Vice President Phil Marincic Jr., of Big Piney and a southeast district director, Gene Bass of Torring-ton and Glendo. SKI MOVIES TONITE- GRAMMAS Flitner, the son of State Sen. Howard Flitner, replaces the late Herbert Livingston of Newcastle, who died in September after being president of the largest agriculture organization in the state for the past 10 years. Marincic had been acting president following Livingston's death. The delegates re-elected Mrs. J. Harrison Talbott of Laramie to her sixth term as chairman of the Bureau's state women's committee. Flitner helps operate a cattle and sheep ranch and an irrigated farm near Greybull with other members of his family. His position as farm bureau president is nonsalaried. Flitner has been on the bureau's state board of directors since 1968 as well as being active in local school affairs and a member of various agriculture organizations. NATIONAL GENERAL THEATRES TODAY! L OF THEM ALL . hush moumu J OPEN I J s WORLD MUNOS. MONIUU TODAY ONLY MATINEES . All Seat 75c Ph. 252-1322 Open 12:00 Show 12:30-2:15 All SEATS 75' "-iirmp nwri Si wtowoo rDOOUCllONS IDSSiNQ BRUZI-PUH TRIPP WwMk vuasrJT" ECept Ciipli11V Bv BILL WINTER LIVINGSTON (AP) - Harry Allen Stroup spent much of his young adulthood in the shadow of burly Stanley Dean Baker. It was Baker who was an athlete and a leader in Sheridan, Wyo. Stroup, still a string-bean at 20, was an obscure boy. It was Baker, the broad-shouldered society dropout with an affinity for drugs, black magic and the occult, who suffered the companionship of the bearded Stroup when both turned away from society for a murderous trip on the fringes of the hippie movement. And Baker, the self-professed cannibal, magician and sensational slayer, still overshadows Stroup even as the 20-year-old is on trial for his life in this Montana mountain community. It is Baker who will be in the headlines even after a seven-man, five-woman jury returns a verdict on Stroup's guilt or innocence in the July 10 cannibalism murder of James Michael Schlosser, a Montana social worker. Authorities in San Francisco Saturday announced they charge Baker with the murder of noted lamp designer Robert Salem, 40, whose body was found in his bloodstained quarters in the San Franciscan Hotel in April. A bloody tale of cannibalism surfaced in the Salem slaying with discovery that the killer had tried to cut off the victim's head, and had removed the left ear. The first hint of Baker's involvement in the West Coast slaying came during testimony by the convicted slayer Friday morning at Stroup's first-degree murder trial. A gasp pierced the courtroom as defense attorney Michael Whalen asked Baker: "Did you, in fact, kill Bobby Salem, re move his ear, cook It and eat it." A hint of a smile crossing his features. Bilker sullenly refused to answer. Baker had no hesitance about depicting the bloody riverbank scene where he watched in an LSD-magnified rage at "the establishment" as Schlosser climbed into a sleeping bag. With Stroup walking along a highway miles away, Baker said, he shot Schlosser, ate his heart and slashed his body into six parts. The packed courtroom was hushed as Whalen drew Baker out on details of his trip with Stroup from Sheridan, Wyo., to Toronto, Ont., where Baker said he changed the weather through a magical ceremony. "I know I changed the weather," Baker said, "I've done it many times." Baker recounted a drug-filled trip across Canada and into Montana, then to a highway overpass east of Livingston where, he said, he and Stroup parted. Employment Rise CHEYENNE, Wyo. (AP) -The U.S. Commerce Department director in Cheyenne said service trade employment in Wyoming increased 20 per cent over the past decade. Director Joseph D. Davis said 1970 census figures show service trade employment increases leading all other private sector employment rises. Davis said Wyoming's first quarter taxable payroll income increased 58 per cent in the 1959-1969 period. National figures showed service employment increasing 72 per cent. Other big gainers in employment were agricultural services and the finance-insur-ance-and real estate business. With thunder and lightning exploding about him, with an LSD trip magnifying his frustration and anger at having been turned down for a job, Baker slaughtered the bespectacled Schlosser, took his car and "left in a big hurry to look for Harry." Baker and Stroup wound their way through Montana, Idaho, Washington and Oregon before arriving in California where they stopped in Berkeley. Then the hippie pair found a lonely dirt road in the mountainous wooded area of Big Sur, and drove toward the summit where they would leave Schlos-ser's car. Only a collision with another car interrupted the plan, leading eventually to the courtroom scene where Baker professed his alienation from the human race. "I've had friends," Baker said in a moment of seriousness, "but they always wound up talking about me behind my back." Baker revealed "frequent impulses to dispose of Harry Allen Stroup," but said he resisted them because "good friends are hard to find." Stroup avoided Funds Missing RENO, Nev. (UPD-Police Chief Elmer Briscoe says he'll give his officers lie detector tests to track down a missing $850 in department funds. The chief also shifted his three top aides while he investigated the loss of the money, which was kept in a locked box in a locked safe in the division office. "If the guilty party is found, I will personally file charges," he said Fridav. Livestock Quotations BOXINGS Direct trading very slow this week, with activity largely at area markets. Confirmed sales this week 650 slaughter cattle. 19S0 feeder cattle. Last week 550 slaughter cattle. 4.975 feeder cattle. 5,200 sheep. Same week year ago 500 slaughter cattle, 1 .400 feeder cattle. SLAUGHTER CATTLE: Few sales steers and heifers fully 50 lower. Current delivery. Net wights FOB, 4 pet pencil shrink. Choice 1050- i yield g I20O lb steers yiel loads 26.75. Choice 875-1000 lb heifers yield grade grade 2-4 largely 26.50, couple 2-4 25.50-25.75. FEEDER CATTLE: Limited sales calves for immediate delivery near steady. Net weights FOB, 2-4 pet pencil shrink. Mixed Choice and Prime 400-500 lb steers 35.00-37.00, mostly Choice 34 00-35.00. Choice and Prime 350-450 lb heifers 31 .00-34.00, mostly Choice 30 00-31 .00. WEEKLY LIVESTOCK SUMMARY CATTLE Sa la be this week at two markets approximately 10.750 head. Last week 11,072. Compared last week, slaughter cows strong to 50 yearlings and claves , occasional sales higher. Slaughter bulb strong, 25-50 hither. Feeder vearun uneven, bulk late sales generally steady. Feeder cows fully 50 higher. Volume this week about 40 cows and duus, zu pet yearungs, balance Lin irgety claves. SLAU ilXJHTER STEERS: Few lota high-Good and Choice 1000-1225 lbs 25 00-26.30. SLAUGHTER COWS: Utility and Commercial 18 00-21. SO.large bulk 18 50-21.00. Canner and Cutter largely 17 00-20 00. SLAUGHTER BULLS: Most Commercial and Good 24 50-26 75 Utility 23 00-24 50. FEEDER STEERS: High Choice and Prime 300-400 lbs 39 0O-40 50, 400-500 lbs 36 00-39 50, 500450 lbs 32 0045 50. Choice 300-400 lbs 37 00-40 00, 400-500 lbs 34.00-38 00, thin 500-700 lbs largely 30 00-32 50, fleshy 28 00-31 50, 700 1050 lbs 25 50-29 00 Good 300-400 lbs 35 00-37 00. 400-500 lbs 30 00-35 00, 500-700 lbs 20.00-29.00, 700-1000 lbs 24 00-27 00. FEEDER HEIFERS: High-Choice and Prime 300-400 lbs 34 00-37.00, 400-500 lbs 33 00-35 50. 500450 lbs 28 00-31 00. Choice 300-400 lbs 32 00-35 50. 400400 lbs 30 00-34.00, thin 500-700-lbs 26 50-29 50, fleshy 55O400 lbs 25 00-27 50. Good 300-400 t 31 00-33 00, 400-500 lbs 28 00-31 50. SOM0O lbs 23 50-26 50. FEEDER COWS: Commercial and Standard 600-1100 lbs 20.00-13.50. Cutter and Utility 18 00-21 50 BRED COWS: Few lots Good to mostly Choice mixed ages 219 00-240 00 per head. Few mostly Good 17500-21000. SHEEP: Salabe this week at two markets about 3900 head. Last week 5451. Compared last week, slaughter lambs fully 50 lower. Slaughter wews steaoy. r eeoer lamns 50-1 .00 lower. SLAUGKTF.R LAMBS: Few lots mostly Choice 85-115 lbs 23 00-24.00. Mixed Good and Choice 22 50-23 50. SLAUGHTER EWES: Cull to Good 4 00-7.50 FEEDER AND SHEARING LAMBS: Bulk Choice and Fancy 55-80 lb mixed lambs 24 50- 26 00. 80-100 lbs 23 00-24.50. Good and Choice 50-100 lbs 22.00-23 50. SIDNEY A total of 6 012 cattle told this week at the Sidney Livestock Market Center, well above the 4,-350 last week, and the 4.515 head for the same week a year ago. Not enough fat cattle either steers or heifers, were sold to test the market Cows sold fully steady under an active market. No steers in the 1,000 to 1.200 lb. nor the 1,200 to 1.350 lb. weights were sold; good to choice fed heifers. 750 to 900 lbs., 25 to 25 50: medium to good. 24 50 to 25. No heifers In the 900 to 1,050 lb. weights sold, and no common to medium fed steers and heifers. Young heifer type cows, 20 to 25 50: utility and commercial cows, 18 to 20; bulls, 22 to 25 50; and shelly canners, 15 to 17 50. In the stocker and feeder classes M0 yearling item sold on active market. Ligher weight good quality calves sold steady. Plainer kinds and heavy calves. 50c to 31 lower. Good to choice steers. 550 to 650 lbs., 29.50 to 30 50; medium to good, 28 to 29 50; good to choice steers. 650 to 800 lbs., 29 to 30 20; medium to good, 28 to 29: good to choice steers, 800 to 850 lbs., 28 to 29; medium to good, 26 to 28: no common to medium, and no fleshy feeder steers nor heifers sold; good to choice heifers, 500 to 600 lbs . 28 to 28 50; medium to good, 27 to 28; no common to medium, and no heifers in the 600 to 750 lb. weight sold. Good to choice steer calves, 300 to 400 lbs., 37 to 41; common and medium, 35 to 37; good to choice steer calves, 400 to 400 lbs., 34 to 38 50; common and medium, 32 to 34; good to choice heifer calves, 300 to 400 lbs., 34 to 36; common and medium, 32 to 34; good to choice heifer calves, 400 to 500 lbs., 32.50 to 35; common and medium, 30 to 32.50; stock cows and bred heifers, $210 to $265. No cows and elves in pairs and no dairy type calves sold. A total of 1.680 head of sheep were sold, with medium, good, and choice spring slaughter lambs selling from 23 to 24.50; medium good and choice feeder lambs, 25 to 27.50; killer ewes, 15 50 to $7; breeding ewes, f 15 to 330. Hogs sold totaled 875 head with butcher hogs top at 14 50 to 15; bulk butchers, 14 to 14 50; sows, 300 to 500 lbs., 8 to til, and weanera, 38 to 114. Thanksgiving week will have the hog and sheep sale on Monday and the cattle sale both Monday and Wednesday, instead of the usual Wed.-Thurs. cattle sale. OMAHA (AP) - (USDA) - Compared last week: Hogs: Barrows and gilts steady to 50 higher; 190-230 lbs 16.25-1675; 230-260 lbs 15 00-16 00 ; 270-280 lbs 14.25-15.25; 280-290 lbs 13 75-14 75; 290-300 lbs 13 50-13.75; sows weak to mostly 25 lower; 290-400 lbs 12.25-13.00; 400-600 lbs 11.00-12.35; a few 600-650 lb 10.75-1100. Cattle: 1.000-1.150 lb steers weak to 25 lower; 1,150-1,300 lbs mostly 50 lower; heifers weak to 25 lower; cows weak to 25 lower; feeder cattle and calves steady; high choice and prime 1,074 lb steers 28.00; choice and prime 1.059-1,189 lbs 27.60; 1,032-1,207 lbs 27.35-27.50; choice 26.50-27.25; high choice and prime 27 00-27.50; good and low choice 24 50-26 50; high choice and prime 1,061 lb heifers 27.10; choice 25.75-26.50; good and low choice 23.50-26.00; utility and commercial cows 18.00-19 25; a few at 19.50; canner and cutter 16.00-1800; choice and prime 361-510 lb feeder steers 3825-4000; same grade 769 lbs 32 00; choice 386-496 lb 34 00;38 00; choice and prime 399-505 lb feeder heifers 34 25-35 00; choice 351-438 lb 30 25-33 00; 488-725 lbs 26.50-29.35; choice 401 lb 34.00 per head; good and choice stock cows 19 50-20 00. Sheep: Lambs closed SO lower; ewes 2505- lower; choice and prime shorn lambs 26 00; choice and prime wooled 24 50-25.00; choice 22.00-23.50; cull, utility and good ewes 5 00-6.50. NGIANTj V TOffflR ELIZABETH TAYLOR RflRK HllFlRnN -. IAMFR F1FAM tlAIUKl at 1:30-5:00-8:30 P.M. J l Git- r afEUk mmA EXPOSED thrith HIDOf CAMtRA! COLOR Ylrmlia"" ! iflniiiit. afiMbMt-M 4 "WITCHCMfT" IJM45415 (C0 mm inerar4iHa m m HW4 JSMS " 8J -iignit ana 101 'DIRTY DINGUS McGEE" IS COMING TO THE FOX T JOOOOOOOOOC DENVER (API-Cattle 2.900; slaughter cows mostly steady; feeder cows steady to 50 lower; bulls weak to 1.00 lower; feeders mostly steady. Slaughter steers, high good and mostly choice 1050-1165 lbs 26 30-26.75; slaughter heifers, high-good and mostly choice 965-1010 lbs 25.10-2575; slaughter cows, cutter and utility 1800-19 00; canner and low cutter 17.00-1800; few canner 16 50-17 00; slaughter bulb, cutter, utility and few commercial 1200-1700 lbs 2350-25 10; feeder steer calves, choice, thin, 315-375 lbs 3910-40 75; 375-450 lbs 36.00-39 40; choice, fleshy 400-465 lbs 33.75-36.00; good 330-450 lbs 3000-34 00. Feeder steers: choice 515-600 lbs 3200-33 50, thin 600-700 lbs 31 50-32 85; feeder heifers, choice and scattering prime 485-665 lbs 28 00-30.50; 650-750 lbs 26 00-2800; high good and choke fleshy 750-850 lbs 24 50-26.30. Sheep: Slaughter lambs under 110 lbs weak to 50 lower; heavier weights 50-100 lower; other classes steady, except feeder lambs over 80 lbs 50 lower; receipts 1.200. Wooled slaughter lambs, choice and pnme 100-110 lbs 24 50-25 80; 112-112 lbs clustering 24.00: shorn slaughter lambs, deck, high choice and pnme 119 lbs No. 1 pelts 26.15; cull, utility and good slaughter ewes 4 00-5.80; good and choice, short-term breeding ewes 600-890; choice and some fancy feeder lambs 70-80 lbs 25.00-26 00. few lots 26 20-26 40; good and mostly choice (047 lbs 23 00-25.00. SHERIDAN Livestock saleable at the Sheridan Livestock Exchange's regular sale Thursday, 545 cattle, i sheep, 42 hogs. The market was stronger to 50 higher on all classes of cattle, instances of 1.00 higher. Commercial cows 19 50 to 21 50 Utilities 18 50 to 20 25. Canner and cutters 17.00 to 19 25. heeding from Good slaughter bulls 24.50 to 25 75, thinner types from 21 70 to 23 50. 550 to 660 feeder steers orougnt 3U au to il iw 35 to 500 lb. steer calves brought 33 50 to 37 50 with lighter types to 42 50. Yearling heifen brought 25 00 to 28 25 with hei- Baker's glance during the testimony. The high drama of Baker's appearance, with his sullen replies and studied arrogance, made a bit player of Stroup in a trial in which he might have been the star figure. Taking the stand in his own defense, Stroup was confident in reciting a story identical with that of Baker's, saying they indeed had "split up" at the highway overpass. Stroup said he was going back to Sheridan. Under questioning by special prosecutor Arnold Berger, a dominating, gravelly-voiced figure with a passion for courtroom battle, Stroup was vague and uncertain on some points, including the time at which he allegedly was picked up by Baker after Schlosser's death. Refuting Baker's statement that he could "control Harry Stroup's mind," Stroup said he was not sure whether he believed in what Berger called "Baker's hokey-pokey." "You don't really believe all that crap?" Berger challenged the startled Stroup. "I don't know; I don't discount it," Stroup whispered. Stroup maintained his stance that he could not discount Baker's professed powers to control other peoples' minds and to "have a direct contribution to the death of pop singer Jimi Hendrix," even though Hendrix had been in England at the time. The jury, which is expected to get the case Tuesday, may find itself concerned primarily with the merits of testimony given by two persons Baker and one-time gas station attend-at Tom Putnam. Putnam, a tall, blond youth who now shares an insurance business with his father in Sheridan, Mont., testified that on (the night of July 10 he was working in a gas station in Bozeman. At about 10:30 to 11:30 that night Putnam said, "a couple of guys with long hair, rather rough looking" came into the station. "I remember because at night when you work alone, you get to talking to anything that walks, including yourself." Putnam identified one of the men as Baker, but refused to say with certainty that Stroup had been the other occupant of the car. "I can't say for certain, and I won't make a rash statement," Putnam said. "I don't want that on my conscience." Other testimony established the fact that if Stroup was indeed the other passenger, the story given by Stroup and Baker would be cast into doubt as to time sequence; Additional Quotations -T- Textron .90 Texir pf2 08 Textr pll 40 inionoi .w Thorn Bet Thorn Ind ThomJW ThriftDr TI Corn TidewatM Timeln 104 .40 .90e .60 120 .40 1.90a ling cattle were In good demand bringing 19.00 to 21.50 with younger types to 23 70. I slaughter bulls 24.50 to 25.75, thinner types . TimesMir .50 Timken 180 TishRlty .40 TobinPk .40 ToddSh 1.20 ToledEd 1.72 Toot Rol .40b TraneCo .90 TransU 1.20 TransW Air TmWAir pf2 TmWFin .401 Trammra 55 Transa pf4 50 Transcon .10 Transrtl Inv Transitron Travelrs 80 Travelrs pf 1 Tri Con 2 45e TriCon pf250 Trianglnd .80 Tmpican Pd TRW Inc la TRW pf450 TRW pf440 TRW pf4.25 TucsnGE .72 Twent Cent Tyler Corp Monte Walsh nn hnnui : i .. . 4)AU4l dh tmt ",,v" .wmpromising as me lire it depicts ... It is a tT7ATC!f7 : hi,orv; a ,im of collisions and changes when the wtta mm mm mum Monte Walsh is what the West was all about JACK PALANCE is sure to be nominated for "Best Supporting Actor" w" oecame tamed and the men who molded it fought against all odds to preserve the way of life they had created. V LEE HAIWII7 in the most challenging role of his career JEANNE MOREAU is "Superb" From tie author of "SHANE" OS A Real Western STARTS BggPgj Ph. 252-1322 WEDNESDAY fer calves bringing 31 00 to 33 75 with lighter types to 38 00. Because of the Thanksgiving holiday the Sheridan Livestock Exchange will hold its weekly sale on Tuesday, November 24th for next week only. I ENDS TUE5.1 Ph. 252-1322 joz riAr.iA7ii as C.C.Ryder at hit airf U COf.Z'PJL'JY Loving, 1 'Kft, brawlina T,-",i (. and s. I bustin' AJJi it up! Jl J VVv'Y. . Open 5:30 Coto by Mows) IMAMf Mil.! 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