Logansport Pharos-Tribune from Logansport, Indiana on March 7, 1895 · Page 4
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March 7, 1895

Logansport Pharos-Tribune from Logansport, Indiana · Page 4

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Logansport, Indiana
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Thursday, March 7, 1895
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oho Gray's CORNER ON Embroideries. Special sale for the next ten days. Most beautiful design*) ever brought to Logansport, in Irish Points, English and Scotch Effects, Guloons and Double Edges. Ladies you will be pleased if you call and nee the ID. to National Bant Lognnsporf, Indiana. CAPITAL $200,000 DAILY JOURNAL PnbUtbed eyetj day In the week (except Jfondaj) bj tbe LOSAHBPOBT JOURNAL Co. Highest of all in Leavening Power.—'Latest U. S. Gpv't Report W. S. WRI8HT A. HABUY C. W. GBATE8 S. B. B01TEB VICE PBISIDBHT. SiCWTTAJlT. TBIASUBIB Price per Annum Price per Month S6.OO • 5O Baking Pder ABSOLUTELY PURE HAND WEESTLDfG. THE OrnciAi. FAPEB OT'THX Cmr. [Entered as second-clais matter at the Logozu- portPost Office, Kebtnary 8. 1SS8.] THURSDAY MORNING MARCH 7 A New Fad That Is Now Popular with Studenta i. V. JWIUSON, Puns. S. W, ULLKUT, VICE PRZH H. T. IlKITUIil.NK, CASKIKli. —niKKCTOHS.— J. V. Johnson S. W. Cilery, J. T. Elliott, W. M. Elliott, W. H. Snider. S Buy and seJ] Government Bonds. Loan money on personal security and collaterals. Issue special oer- tifloatea of deposit bearing 3 per cent when left one year; 2 per cent pw annum when deposited G month f. Boxes in Safety Deposit Vaults of this bank for the deposit of deeds, Insurance policlefi, mortgages ar.d othor valuables, rented at from $f to f 15 per year HOYT'S Sure CureZfor PJJes. LiKKrmr CKNTKJI.O., Kel). 15,1SW. To whom 11 may concurri: I mnstliniirtllyrKCOimnAnd "Ilojt's Sura Cur lor 1'llu.H" toiiil who suitor from this iiiinovln dl.ioiiNB, I siiir«re<i with Plk'slnr feiir.i, mid Me Tiirlous reniKdkw, none ot which iifforrt-d mor Ibfin tniiiDoriiry relief. Aiiont six months H procured on«iulwor Hoyt'.iS-TO Cure fur 1'lle. •ml i!»«J It iicconllnK 10 directions two weeks, n Ibe end of which tlnin the uluer.H dlsii' peitred and inve not slnse returned. I bellove the cure I •ompleto. . D. 3. MIRKS. For Siilo by Bun Fisher. Lake Erie & Western, Peru Union Stiitlon, Tbroneh tickets «old to points In tbo United dtnteauiui Ciiimdu. SOUTH.' > Arrive. Depart. No. 2IlnUlnnnpollHEx..D 7iOOMn No. 23 Mull Jc Express S 11:28a m n : -15 am No. 25 Toledo KxDresn, S 3:25 p m No. a> hvenlnK Express S 8:10 p m No lil Local i'relniutt 4.-15 P m XOBTH. Arrive. Depart. No. 20 Jfall & Express S 10:12 a m lOaSn m No. iffiJUIurilAlii CliyD* <l:SOpm 4:45 pui No!M Detroit Kxrro.i.*S 0;56pm No. 150 Accommodation nt•• ":CO urn D. Dully, S, Datlj except Sunday, •No. 2£d"es not run north of POJU Sundays. tRuns Mondays, Wednt'Hdaya Filduys und Sundays. tfKuns Mondtiy, Tuesday, Thursday and Satur- I8T. Union de^ot connections at BloomlnRton and Peorln for p'-lnts west, noiichwestand northwest. D.lr«-t coimi'Ctluni niiidn ai Lima, Jb'osiorlu, Fremont or fiiiiiui.-kj fur nil points enst. l)n:iie<liiit(H'omiecMotis at Tluion with trains •n Jlnln Line imtl I. A M U. t)lv,, for ull points North.yottih, l-nstnml Wi-st. >'or ticlini.«. rntfs ;im)KWiernl Information cnll on THOS. FOI.LKN, TlcM't ^ei.t I,. E, & Vv. R'y Peru, Indiana. C. K. IM.LY. llon'l Pass. Agl. INDIANAPOLIS, lA'D, TEE DECEASED CONGRESS. It may well be said of Congress that its last act was its best, A moiion to adjourn ia always In order but the benefits to the country of auoh a procedure aeoms not to have occurred to the large and Irresolute body of men assembled aa a burleeq.ue on the law making power until the limitation Q\ the law Itself rendered the step neces- aary. But the step has been taken and Congress is no more, I: was a use- lose body aa far as iho needs of ihe country were concerned, but in its ability to encourage want of confidence U was unexcelled. It IB not likely that the people again will en trust the administration of natk'nal affairs to the party now passing from power nor Is it likely that tho same party under the same banners will nUetnpt to gain national control When the Republican party assumed the reins of the national government In 1861 it appropriated to its use all tho really valuable tenets of Demo ocracy, including the protective ideas of Jefferson and Jackson, and Democracy has since been marking. Now that the mask has been torn aside it ia impossible that the same fallacy will again mislead, and the Republican party must look for Its opponent in new attire and be prepared to find find it in most any cruise. The indications are that the free silver 'movement, not the honest blmetalUn doctrine but the Icflatlon tlnd, v J5 ibsorb or be absorbed, and that In me attempt to carry Western States Democracy and bllvar Inflation will go hand In hand. Should this be be case the outlook will rot be alarm, ng, for though the hand be sofc and oothicg tbe voice will still be that of £ren the Stern Frofcuaors of a Philadelphia University i'leld to 1'::.• Fascin- utfonrt oT the Can::—ilow It In Flayed. The Bicycle Season ^au's. The Republican party has no cause or'ear in a contest In the Western tales themselves in favor of sound money, based on the two meinls. Nor has it any reason lo refuse to meet the country's demands for a sound cur. rency, sufficiently elastic to meet iho varying conditions and the diverse interests. The question must be settled, the party will be placed in power in '96 to settle It and the platforms must be framed with pledgea meeting tbe expectations of the great masses whom it has always beeo'ithe mieiioD of tho party to serve. The clans which will gather under this banner and that, will be powerless. Democracy itself the greatest of the leeeer parties has signal]; failed. IB the Republican party must faith alone be imposed and the true advocate of national progress and prosperity must lend to that party a helping hand. The night has followed the day. Let there be lipht again. IK six months the Gorman.Wilson tariff has brought on a deficiency of $48" 000,000. .i now at bund. Yonr old nbeel likely served Its purpose, nnd )on want u new one. Or pertiaps you are lulnklnv of getting a new one, Ttiou let us show you best wheel such as Uie Eagle, SpAldlnc, Win ton. Royal and >eatberstone. THE Case county man who has experienced ten baptisms If he does uot yet feel sure ofcisalvatlon can at least console himself with the thought that he ia too watersoaked to burn well. BURGMAN CYCLE CO. MEXICO In 1882 had twenty-eevec cotton factories, using 56,600 bales o cotton. There are now, according to a report just made, ISC textile fac torle» with a capital of $17,392,786, employing 21,964 person (. An athletic fad of recent birth but very remarkable growth in popularicy has replaced football in the affections of a host of University of Pennsylvnn a students. It is indifferently classed under a whole dictionary of titles, such as hand, India and Malay wrestling-; but no one seems to know just e.xautly what is the propc-r word by which to designate the sport. It ivas first introduced to the colleg-c boys a few months ng-o by an ex-Amherst student in the Engincwinfr school, and in a very fuw days there was hardly a sing-lc undc-rgraduate who had not tried liis h:ind n.t the game. Not satisfied with the capture of the afCcutions of the students, the hand- wrestling- fad has made its inroads into the ranks of the faculty itself. Those professors who are too old or too dignified to take pan in the fun content themselves with being- very much interested but passive spectators. Cut manj' of the young-er instructors are not proof ag-ainst tho fascinations of the new game, and almost daily contests between the younger and more nctive members of the toachinp- corps and the students are hold in the various halls and classrooms. It docs not take many words to describe this apparent^' irresistible sport, says the Philadelphia Record. The two contestants take a tight grip with their righthands, each aclvanccshisrightfpot to meet the right foot of his opponent, and then they brace themselves hard with the left leg-. At a-given signal the strtifrg-le begins, tho object being to prevent your opponent from moving yon from your feet, and at the same time compel him to shift from bis position. I'he man who moves either foot first is the loser. The rules allow one to move the foot up and down on the too or heel, but not to slide, roll or lift it from the floor. The right hand is allowed to touch tho floor, but not the left, as that would serve to steady one contestant at tho e>rpense of the other. Neither contestant is allowed to use the body or h.ead to assist in the overthrow of his opponent. From the description it might be imagined that tho game allowed a very slight development of skill, but that is not the ease. Tho present university champion is a small fellow, but the way he can topple over heavy opponents is a lesson. He has a number of very clever tricks, ouc of whiuh throws his rival off his feet and down on his shoulders with a thud ever after to be .remembered. The most amusing side of the new game comes from its surprising popularity, and t]i(; lack of preparation required for a contest. Does a professor fall to put in his appearance on the moment, or leave the room, and it is ten to one that the entire class will be on foot in an instant, and when tho represe^it- ativu of the faculty returns lie will find the room occupied by struggling couples. All the spare time between hours is employed in the same way, frequently with a professor or so as part of the interested audience. It was only a few days ago that a big crowd gathered in the gymnasium to see the champion of 'the Engineering school try his skill against W. D. Osgood, tho great halfback. Owing to some misunderstanding, Osgood did i»ot appear, but, lest he should finally come, a veiy bus}' professor, who had taken a moment from liis work to see the fray, and did not wish to miss it on any ac- ] count, left word that he was to be sent for in case Osgood did finally arrive. If you see any university student •whose wrist, or hand is painted with iodine, and whose knuckles are badly skinned, you mav place Mm doxvn as a devotee of the new game of band- wrestling. It would indeed be \vorSi listening to to have it explained how this mass was slowly shoved perhaps two thousand or three thousand miles, dumped bodily in Coitsville, without a trail of detritus by which it could be traced to its lair. The surrounding region is singularly free of this kind of material, and how came so large a quantity of this rock so rarely seen in strata, all smoothed and polished off into these myriads of pebbles, to be resting here? Without a doubt these little white policies, are eloquent with a marvelous history, both as to origin and method of transportation, but who is it that is equipped to discern "the still small voice'' that comes through the interminable agos, and to give lus the interpretation? GEOLOGICAL PUZZLE IN OHIO. the Bicycle SfeMfiwer Eerr.'ce 4-21 UA.RKET iT. THON! 60. WANTED. W ANTED—AnlntPirrpntacMvcD-Jin orlndj to ticvel for reliable boose wltb expenses paid. Saloj J600. Advancrnient for fJtlihful and snc- •wfUIwrk. Ke'an-ric*. Fncloje »elf ad<t«>H«l itnni( rd envflopo. f-ecietniT. Lock Drawer P. Celling". TO IIAJCE BIG 5IONET selllnR Mir Hcctrlc Tpl«- t pbon>-\ Best aileron earth. Sent nU com- tPreadv to setup; linns of ony distance. A ctl nl Electric Telei-hone. Our »JMIU rrak« to $10 ii dnj e«»y. Even body buss; BIjt lIoii'T ihout work. Pilre* low. Any .one can make p perm n'n A'ldreM, . P. Hurlton A Co., Clerk 11, Columbus, Ohio- MKS. OLTPHANT, the English cove, list, has already written seventy eight novels that were published and Is at work on one or two others. Ber novels, however, are healthy in tone, and many «f them of merit. AN iron railroad bridge ie to span the Dardanelles and connect Europe with Asia. It will rest on eight eoor nous piers, and be nearly 250 feet above the water, BO as to allow ebipi of every description to pass freely. It will be begun next summer and the estimator put the cost at $15.000.000. A French company undertakes the project. Pebblen In Thoasund» of Tom Found Far from Any Similar Deponlt. A few miles east of Voungstown, O., in the township of Coitsville, which makes the northeast corner of Mahon- Ing county, is a freak of nature of an entirely exceptional character, says the Pittsburgh Dispatch. Rising above an otherwise rather level surrounding is an irregular elevation composed almos' wholly of smooth, white pebbles, such as one sees in tho sand pumpings after torpedoing "pebble rock" and which may also be seen conglomerated in RETARDING PHYSICAL DECAY, ( Llow Life Could n« I'roloneed to Nearly Tvrlco Jt« Usual Ltugtti. Without eating and drinking there is no life; but we may select certain kinds of food contaiaing a minimum amount of the elements which eause the ossific blockages in the system. An English physician, Dr. C. R Du Lacy Evans, who made many researches in regard to our food, comes to the conclusion that more'fruit should be eaten, espet-inlty apples, grapes and bananas, they being rich in nutritious elements. Being deficient in nitrogen, they are best for elderly people, as they keep the blood in a better condition than flesh. IHourens, in his well-known work on "iluman Longevity," cites the case of tho Italian centenarian Cornaro, whose recipe for health and long life was e'x- treme moderation in all things. Flourens himself insists that a century is the normal life, but the fifty years beyond, end even two hundred 3'ears, arc human possibilities under advantageous conditions, llufeland also believed in two hundred years as an extreme limit. Sir James Crichton Browne, M, D., concedes, in a late address, that Flourens was right. Duration of growth gives tho length of life. Hufeland held that tho human body grows till the age of twenty-five, and that eight times the growth period was the utmost limit of man. But if twenty years be taken as the time of growth, even five times that will give us a century. According to Flourens and Cuvier, man is of the fru- givorous or fruit and nut-eating class of animals, like the gorillas and other apes nnd monkeys. Man has not teeth like the lions and carnivorous beasts, neither has he teeth like the coves and herbivorous ones. Intestines in the man are seven or eight times the length of the body; the lion's are but three times the length .of his body. Herbivorous animals, like the cow, have intestines forty-eight tunes the length of the body. So, judging man by his tectb, his stomach and his intestines, he is naturally and primitively frugivorous, and was not intended to eat flesh. Fruit is aperient, and apples act on the liver, and are good brain food also, as they contain much phosphoric acid. As to tho eil'ect of certain climates, perhaps too much stress has been laid upon that. We find that Thomas Parr, who lived in England, died in his one hundred and fifty-third year, and was dissected by the celebrated discoverer of the circulation of the blood, Dr. William Harvey (who expressed no doubt of his age), was never out of his native country. Accounts of men who have lived to extreme age in Ecuador and Mexico indicate possibilities. A climate that allows much outdoor living is the best for health. More depends on food than on any climate. Exercise, fresh air to live in and to sleep in, daily bathing and freedom from medicine are tbe important things. In July, 1893, the Courier-Journal, of Louisville, published a long account of James Mo- Mulltn, who died in Carlisle county, Ky., at one hundred and seventeen years of age. When Buflon, Hufeland, Flourens, and men of that class, who had studied the subject, believed in the possibility of one hundred and fifty or two hundred years of life, the subject is not to be laughed at. Removal Sale. Of a collossal stock of Clothing and Furnishings into the New Fashion Store. *i ^ Preparatory of remodeling our store which when completed will be the finest in the city. Note the Following Slaughter Prices, $20 Suits, present price $15. removal prioe $11.85 flu Suite, present price, $10, removal price S.M $13 Suits, present price $9, removal price , 6.75 $10 Suits, present priae $S, removal price (5.00 17,00 Child Suit, present price $0. removal price -i.GO $0 Child Suit, present price $400, removal price 3.00 $0,00 Child Suit, present price $2.50, removal price , 2.00 Arj Overcoat, Suit, Pant*, Shirts, Gloves, Under wear, Hats or Caps at 25 per cent, per dollar Jess than our present cat prices. It is the grandest opportunity yet offered by any first class establishment. This is a cash sale To-Be-Sure. S ' Ke?pectfuliy ; HARRY FRANK, TO BE> SURB. LOGANSPORT. DELPHI. FLORA. NEW YORK. A REFUGE FOR IDLERS. PUBUC SCHOOLS IN MEXICO. They Will Be Like Our*, and Enfllih Will Be Taarbt la Tbem. I have it from pretty good authority, says a recent traveler in Mexico, that it is the purpose of the Mexican government, within four or five years, to establish a complete system of public schools reaching into every corner of the republic. The teachers therefor cannot be obtained here, nor for years to comei This will make a demand for probably ten or fifteen thousand teachers. In view of this it will be seen how important it is for those who have an idea of teaching 1 to study the Spanish language, so as to be able to avail themselves of the opportunities which some localities where certain rock j will thus be opened. Kansas City has strata are exposed. The peculiar bank I already moved in this direction by under consideration consists of several making- Spanish a part of her common acres, with the highest point, perhaps ten or twelve feet high and gradually thinning out into the common plain. There is nothing anywhere in the region to suggest anything of the kind, no trail of sMch material to show where school course. The students of Mexico are now ahead of us on this question. They recognize that English is the rival language of the continent, and they go to colleges in the United States for the sole purpose of adding English Recclfteg of the National Capitol a Favorite Loafing Place. The capitol is a shelter for the shel- terless during cold and nasty weather, says the Washington Post. It is much more agreeable to sit in the warm galleries and nod through the speeches and debates than to shiver over a fireless stove in an attic. A number of impecunious old gentlemen have discovered this and avail themselves of the hospitality of the government with profit and comfort to themselves and harm to no one, for on inclement days few people have enough ambition to go up to congress, even when matters of great interest are under discussion. A large contingent of decayed gentility make daily pilgrimages there, with the excuse that they arc interested in legislation. Some of the more fortunate ones carry a "snack" in their pockets, and can be seen surreptitiously conveying morsels of bread and cheese, in some cases the fragrant bologna, from their pockets to their mouths. The majority of these worthies prefer the house side, where there is some movement and excitement, but those who seek rest rather than entertainment go to the senate gallery, where it is possible to sleep peacefully through the long speeches^ Two very much out- at-the-elbow gentlemen were overheard in the rotunda discussing into which gallery they should go. "I want to be cheered up, and they are still fighting about the currency bill," said the tall, slim one, whose legs were too long for his . trousers and whose nose looked as if he had been accustomed to another sort of cheer, but his thick comrade, who had been cheered already, decided in favor of the senate, and they separated. There were only seven members on the floor with Senator Pasco, who was delivering his speech on the Nicaragua canal. Our venerable friend rested his head a-gainst the partition, and soon his gentle snoring interrupted the unusual quiet of the chamber. Fortunately he escaped the attention of the ever vigilant doorkeepers and his nap lasted until the senate adjourned. Tho doorkeepers do not allow sleeping in the galleries if they know of it, since an unhappy disturbance was one day created by an unlucky slumbercr who had the nightmare and awoke clutching the air and crying: "Kill him! kill him!" To those gentry who are intellectually inclined the library offers an asylum, The long tables are filled with men, shabby, unkempt, almost shoeless, who read and make notes in the most learned way. It is interesting to note that the favorite books of thia class are blcod and thunder novels and works on socialism. Occasionally you see one of them, a broken down pedagogue, perhaps, reading the classics, and many of them call for books in foreign languages. I looked over the shoulders of a red-headed; freckled, cadaverous, un>clean specimen and. found that his grimy hands held a copy of Milton's "Paradise Lost." ' who plays tne concertina, never sa\r at all, and he is much cuter than me in many things. Be had nothing to forget, whereas I had. "1 have no trouble in walking along- the streets,u ei ther h as Jim, so long, that is to say, as there is nothing in the way lower than the height of my ear. When. they are lower than that, I do not hear them so well. Yes, I mean what I say. 1 can tell without touching it when I am passing, say, a lamp post, or a telegraph pole, or coming near a high wall. The substance seems to strike upon the car before you come up to it. Itsecms to make a. difference in the air, and all bliud men whose ears have nothing the matter with them will tell you the same. You notice no difference? Of | course not.' You have ^got your eyes, and would never think of using 3'0ur ears for that purpose, even if you knew how. Yes, I daresay you are right; I should say it does require training. I know it look me a long time to learn." THEIR OWN NUTCRACKERS. Kusy Birds IVlilch You May See In th» AVonilH Tllll Month. Perhaps you . would like to hear of a curious little bird. Go out into the woods in January or February any time and you may see him. He is about six inches long. He wears a black cap, a grayish blue coat aud a dirty white shirt front. lie runs up aud down the tree trunks, searching diligently for little insects who think they have hidden themselves safely away in some little crack in the bark, says the New York World. He is a quiet little fellow, having song. The only noise he makes if harsh call, which sounds likc<the "quank!" This bird is'called the nuthatch, because he is fond of nuts, crack-, ing them open and eating the kernels. You may see one of them take ac acorn as big as his head, and fixing it in some crevice in the tree pound awa.y upon it with his little bill until it breaks open and re'./ards the little worker with a .meal. These birds are also expert gymnasts. They will run up a tree, going swiftly round and round it all the way up. Then quickly turning about they will' come down the trunk head first in the same fashion, stopping now and then to snap up some little bug or worm which has ventured out to see what the weather is. Country boys sometimes speak of these birds as "little devil down heads." But this is longer and not so pretty a* the nuthatch. TOLD BY A BLINDMAN. it came from, but when the tain soil is : to their literary stock in trade. Mexico removed it is simply one mass of these is developing scholars who can hold peculiar and evidently : water-worn . their own with any on the continent, stones, ranging ia size from a common , They are delving into every research, pea to a marble. The deposit must • and are well-read and liberal-minded, amount to tens of thousands of tons. • The literature of Mexico is now quito It would be most interesting to have an ; extensive, covering the field of history, explanation of this pebble bank from ; biography, political economy, -cience some of the authorities on geology, on the accepted hypotheses of jjlaciation. and poetry. How He Manage! to Get Aboit and Heart Objects. "I can't see the least light in the world; the brightest sun that ever shone and the darkest night are all the same to me. J once received a violent blow on the eye—accidentally, of course, . for no one would strike such as us willfully—after I had become stone blind, and then I saw a flash of fire like lightning. I remember what lightning is like, for I was grown up when 1 lost my eyesight. I sometimes wished I had lost it earlier, for it takes a long" time leanunsr.to be blind. My mate, here, i CSF'Tariff reform has engineered a splendid crop of "receivers," awful thick ice and "bonds" until the people can't sleep.—Chicago Inter Ocean. (WO/TAN'S FRIEND.) 18 the BEST v» GIRL, WIFE, MOTHER. Sold br B t Xet&ltas and John Coolson

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