Dayton Daily News from Dayton, Ohio on December 10, 1982 · 42
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Dayton Daily News from Dayton, Ohio · 42

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Dayton, Ohio
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Friday, December 10, 1982
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42
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I INSIDE THIS SECTION Ufestyfe. 33-34 Dear Abby, 34 Entertainment, 40-43 DAYTON DAILY NEWS Friday. Dec. 10, 1982 Page 31 Z3B .Return ensaffemen 9W By KAREN RAY ' Stan Writer YELLOW SPRINGS The crewcut ; that was J. Dudley Dawson's trade-: mark during his four decades at An- tloch College is gone. It has been re-; placed by longer snow-white tresses that flow straight back from a deeply ! creased forehead and brush his collar. ; Dawson's tall frame carries less weight than it did In 1967 when he re-! tired from the college after 14 years as its vice president and dean of students. BUT THE 79-YEAR-OLD Dawson ; maintains the years have not dimin- ished his commitment to the 130-year-' old college or his faith in its mission. ; They are among the factors that ' brought him out of retirement to be-! come Antioch's acting deputy provost . for planning and academic affairs. ; ' "I'm dedicated to the college and its I importance to higher education," said J Dawson, who has remained in Yellow j Springs since his retirement. : Antioch College, flagship of the six-- unit Antioch University, is Important because It has "embraced the intellectual, the emotional and the career development of the Individual stu- dent," Dawson said. He pointed to Antioch's emphasis on providing each student with a broad general education, a sound education ; in a specific field and work experience 7 key officials to retire early at McCauley By DARWIN SATOR ,' Business Writer A voluntary early retirement ' plan has cleaned house at the McCauley Accessory Division of Cessna Aircraft. Seven key executives, including division general manager John C. Dussault, will retire effective Dec. 31, said Doug Bauer, division personnel manager. The men have a total of 225 years with the company. Dussault has been general manager of the Vandalia-based Cessna division for 15 years, having also been with McCauley Industrial Corp. before Its acquisition by Cessna. DUSSAULT PLANS to Stay in the Dayton area where he has .been heavily Involved in community activities," including the Dayton Area Chamber of Commerce and the National Aviation Hall of Fame. Dussault was the founder of the Aviation Trail, a self-guided driving tour of the area's most important aviation sites. ' Replacing Dussault as general manager will be Walter Voisard, who had been the chief engineer under Cessna and, before McCauley Industrial was acquired by Cessna, was its vice president , and chief engineer for nine years. A resident of Beavercreek, Voisard is a native of Dayton who graduated from Parker Co-Op High School and earned a degree In mechanical engineering at the University of Cincinnati. He is a licensed pilot. Others electing to retire early are Les Haines, comptroller; Or-ville Bryant, chief inspector-technical; William Peterman, shipping and traffic supervisor; John Sigler, blade line supervisor; Jack Bernheisel, experimen-' tal engineering supervisor, and Ralph Hoyng, maintenance supervisor. "IT'S THE TYPE of people we're losing that's so devastating," Bauer said. "They have a total of 225 years' service. You Ohioan pleads guilty , RATON, N.M. (AP) An Ohio man has pleaded guilty to second-degree murder in the strangulation death of his 75-year-old landlady, whose body was found In a shallow grave in the Antioch ex-dean comes back to to complement classroom learning. "People need a breadth of education, as well as specialty, so they can move from one career to another," Dawson said. He envisioned a day when "most people will have not one career but two or three" in a lifetime and persons with highly specialized training will be ill-equipped for the Job market. Antioch "is not Just a program for today. It's a program for the future." BUT DECLINING enrollment and dwindling financial resources threaten Antioch's future. The college operated at a deficit for the fiscal year that ended in June but the defict was absorbed by other university units. And austerity measures have been taken to bring expenditures in line with revenues. The administration has been streamlined, academic units have been consolidated, positions throughout the college have been pared and the salaries of remaining employees have been reduced. The administrative reorganization led college Provost Charles Ingler to ask Dawson to return to the college last month to fill the new post of deputy provost until a permanent deputy is selected early next year. - Dawson listed increasing revenues and enrollment and Improving the academic program as the college's top concerns. Dussault retiring lose your vice president and general manager.. You lose your comptroller and your only maintenance supervisor." All seven are being replaced either "from employees on layoff or people In-house are assuming some of their responsibilities," according to Bauer.1 Sigler will be replaced by William Bodlsh, who has been manufacturing engineer, Haines will be succeeded by John Carner; Peterman, by Barbara Gaeke, and Hoyng, by Gene Channell. At McCauley, seven of the nine of those eligible for early retirement accepted the offer. Employees had to be at least 55 years old and have 10 years or more of salaried service. Voisard was one of the nine eligible. CESSNA ANTICIPATES more than 150 salaried employee retirements company-wide, out of a total of about 7,000. . McCauley is the world's largest manufacturer of aircraft propellers. In addition, It produces propeller spinners, governors, wheels, brakes and other aircraft accessories. in landlady's slaying victim's basement. John G. VanFossen, 25, of East Liverpool, Ohio, entered the plea In an arrangement with Assistant District Attorney Paquln Terrazas. f J 1 .rvr-.1-) J. Dudley Dawson comes out The acting deputy provost is evaluating Antioch academic programs, the cooperative education program and the campus community to determine where improvements can be made. Several programs already have been pegged for expansion, Including management and administration, environmental science, computer science and writing, he said. A survey of students Is planned for early next year. Jewish festival begins tonight Chanukkah lights mean , By CARRIE LaBRIOLA Staff Writer . Chanukkah, which begins at sundown tonight, is best known as the Jewish festival of lights. But it also is the holiday that celebrates religious freedom, won by a band of Jewish freedom fighters 2,000 years ago. In those days, the Jews of Palestine were ruled by the Syrian-Greek Emperor Antiochus IV, who imposed his beliefs on the empire. In an attempt to force the Jews to accept his faith, Antiochus seized their temple in Jerusalem and filled it with idols. But the elder Mattathias led the Jews into the hills of Judea, where Judah Maccabee, one of the elder's five sons, organized them into an army. THE JEWS FOUGHT for three years and finally drove the army of Antiochus out of Jerusalem. They cleansed and purified the temple, but legend has it that they found just a single jar of holy oil, only enough to keep the eternal light before the Ark of the Covenant burning for one day. Miraculously, according to the legend, the light burned for eight days, allowing the priests time to prepare a new supply of holy oil. Each night of Chanukkah, which means "dedication," an additional candle is lit in the eight-branched menorah, or candelabrum, to commemorate this re-dedication of the temple. It is a Joyous holiday, celebrated In the home. Children often receive small gifts on each of the eight nights. Chanukkah also is the traditional time for playing with the dreidel, a small four-sided top lose sides are inscribed with four Hebrew letters rathaW6ijp4he words that translate: "A the 'HOLiDaY SATURDAY 11 ajn. to 2 pjn. and 3 to 8 pan. Train ride, Jeremi the Talking Tree, and Winnie the Pooh, Courthouse Square. Noon to 1 pan. School Elktonians, Rotunda. Centervllle High Arcade Square Noon to 4 p.m. "Toy Box Memories: The Staff Remembers Christmas Past," Old Courthouse Discovery Gallery. 1 and 2:30 pan. The Sorcerer's Apprentice, Old Courthouse Discovery Gallery. 2 to 3 p.m. Meadowdale High School Concert Band, Arcade Square Rotunda. . 3 and 8 p.m. Tartufte, Victory Theatre. The RTA Christmas Trolley will be on Route 2 from 9 a.m. to 6:15 p.m. & fljhcomebbolize LX help co Bfc ... ySJLTVi M llegiU SMfPlMMMMGwlM of retirement to lend hand "ANTIOCH STUDENTS are thoughtful," the former dean of students said. "We need to listen carefully." Survey results will be used to improve the academic program and campus community and to help the college develop ways to attract more students and a greater cross section of students. ' . Dawson said he is working closely with faculty, staff and students. great miracle triumph of Bob Rosensweet - ipkn Self . ! Mll 0k i : W igfegj' m r J f I - 1 i Mifl 1;, fnty customers Sewer, water rates Montgomery County commissioners are studying a series of water and sewer-rate increases. The proposed increases include a 20 to 33 percent jump for water customers in the Drexel district, a 26 percent increase for sewer customers in the Greater Moraine district and a 38 to 40 percent Increase for water customers In the Northridge district. That includes most of the county's 76,000 water and sewer customers. IT ALSO WAS suggested that the county charge customers throughout the county higher, "more realistic" fees for various tasks water and sewer district staff members perform, such as starting or terminating service. ' "We have no choice," said Commission President Paula J. Macllwaine, who asked Thursday that the commissioners defer a vote until they study the requests more thoroughly. "If we f) igor, fiscal strength "Whatever I do, I dont do it alone," he said. Dawson said the debt he owes Antioch for giving him "three different, but related, careers" also drew him back to the college. The first career began in 1924, when Dawson came to Antioch to teach and head the mathematics department He holds two degrees in mathematics, a bachelor's degree from Denlson University and a master's degree from Ohio State University. What Dawson called "the new Antioch" was in Its infancy in 1924 fathered by then-president Arthur E. Morgan and characterized by the three-pronged approach to education Dawson counts as Antioch's greatest asset. IN 1933, WHEN Morgan left Antioch to head the Tennessee Valley Authority, Dawson followed to become TVA director of training. He returned to Antioch in 1935 as director of cooperative education. He used the experience gained as cooperative education director to launch a post-retirement consulting career from the Yellow Springs home he shares with his wife Nona. The Dawsons have three sons and four grandchildren. Dawson's consulting work has taken him to more than 100 colleges and universities. In 1975, he returned to adds a burner to the outdoor don't (raise rates), we have to run at a deficit." With the proposed Increases, the water bill for the average residential Drexel customer would go to at least $41 a quarter. The average water bill in Northridge would jump to $60. And the average sewer bill in the Moraine district would go to $62. The increases are needed largely because "the cost of producing services has escalated in recent years" said Thomas Saygers, county director of sanitary engineering. In the Drexel and Northridge districts, where the county buys water and sewer service from Dayton, production costs have gone up because Dayton's charges to the county have gone up, Saygers said. IN THE MORAINE district, higher rates are needed to help recoup some of the costs of the new Western Regional wastewater treatment plant, Antioch briefly to serve on commit-; tee that reviewed the cooperative education program. Dawson's third career at Antioch ; began in 1953, when he was named vice president and dean of students. He had served as acting college president during the previous year. As dean, he gained a reputation for being an ardent advocate for students. When Dawson retired in 1967, Antioch was in the early stages of an expansion that resulted in a loosely-knit university with about 20 units across the nation and abroad. During the Intervening years, the college and university have fallen on hard times due, in part, to the weight of the expansion. The fiscal crisis came to a head In 1979 when the college failed to meet its May payroll. TODAY, THE university and the college are recovering, under the leadership of William Birenbaum, who became university president in 1976 and also served as college provost from late 1979 until July. Dawson said the odds are "quite good" that the college can overcome its fiscal problems. "Antioch can succeed and it is succeeding. I wouldn't have come back if I didnt believe that. "In spite of the financial problems of the moment, some way must be found to keep a significant college like this going." freedom menorah at Temple Israel going up which opened about two years ago, Saygers said. ; ' "We never set the rates high enough -to 'completely underwrite the cost of that facility," he said. , , And rate Increases are' warranted -throughout the county because Dayton Power and Light Co. charges and personnel costs have ballooned, he said. Rate increases have not been sought for several years in most of the county's districts because the county has been using Its cash reserves to make ends meet. But now the reserves are low and without an increase the UV tricts will be be running in the red, Saygers said. Commissioners "are expected to make a decision on rates by the end of the year. The new rates would take effect at the end of the first quarter In 1983 and would produce extra revenue for the county by the middle of 1983, Saygersaid. J. .Li

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