Dayton Daily News from Dayton, Ohio on April 17, 2000 · 4
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Dayton Daily News from Dayton, Ohio · 4

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Monday, April 17, 2000
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4A DAYTON DAILY NEWS FROM THE FRONT PAGE MONDAY, APRIL 1 7. 2000 IMF pledges help to poorest Mom hopes lawsuit spreads a message bench, apparently tired. Within moments, he passed out. At 6:53 p.m., he Son's death caused by heat reaction to psychotropic drugs Davton Daily News A friendly basketball game isn't supposed to be deadly. But a June 22, 1993, evening game among patients at the Dayton Mental Health Center left 30-year-old Dawayne C. Colyer dead from heat stroke. Colyer took Thorazine to control his schizophrenia. In December, a lawsuit brought by Colyer's mother, Betty Trisdale, against the Ohio Department of Mental Health was settled for $100,000. Ohio Court of Claims Judge Fred Shoemaker found that a physician's failure to note physical exercise and heat exposure limits in Colyer's medical records violated standards of care, causing his death. With outdoor temperatures in the 80s, Colyer first played a game from 5:45 to 6 p.m., then went inside to cool off in air conditioning. A second game lasted another 15 minutes. During a third game, Colyer only partly participated. He sat do wn on a Debt relief efforts have been criticized By Martin Crutsinger Aancialrd Pjym WASHINGTON The International Monetary Fund concluded a protest-marred opening session on Sunday with a statement repeating past pledges to seek greater debt relief for the poorest countries and reform the IMF so it can better prevent financial crises. The nine-page communique by the fund's policy-setting International Monetary and Financial Committee listed the agency's current work on debt relief and internal reform without introducing any major new ideas. The IMF's current efforts on debt relief and other matters have been criticized as inadequate by anti-globalization activists, including those in the streets outside who failed to shut down the opening meetings but did make getting to the sessions difficult. Asked what impact thousands of demonstrators chanting for the abolition of the IMF had on the meetings, British Chancellor of the Exchequer Gordon Brown, who led the sessions, said the finance ministers were even more determined to work for a better-functioning IMF. "Our way of tackling the problems of poverty and the injustices that exist is not to walk away from the global economy ... but to strengthen economic cooperation and make it work more effectively," Brown said. "This is what we planned to discuss. This is what we did discuss." , ; ? -H' w" WASHINGTON POLICE PUSH back The two-day meetings of the IMF and World Bank continue Monday with a daylong session of the Development Committee, the policy-setting group for the World Bank. The IMF discussions took place after a huge plunge in U.S. stock prices, which wiped out $2 trillion in wealth last week. Brown said that turbulence underscored the IMF's determination to exhibit "continued vigilance" on world finance demonstrators near the World the workings of financial markets around the globe. He said the IMF, heavily criticized for its failure to limit the fallout from the 1997-98 global currency crisis, was continuing to examine ways to strengthen its early-warning system. The communique directed the IMF's 24-member executive board, which runs the agency on a daily basis, to explore ways to monitor HEAT: Medicines may increase death risk Pivotal week for Elian, painful anniversaries nations RICK B0WMERASS0CIATED PRESS Bank in Washington on Sunday. world economies more closely. It said work would continue on efforts to better measure the performance of banks and other financial institutions and monitor the buildup of countries' foreign debts. On debt relief, the policy group repeated its goal of having more countries qualify this year for reduction in debt payments. So far, only Uganda has seen any cuts in its debt bills from the initiative. the government is making. But I fear what will happen if they try to force things. There will be trouble." On CBS' 60 Minutes program Sunday, Elian's father accused the boy's Miami relatives of "child abuse" for turning his son against him. Juan Miguel Gonzalez was especially angered by a videotape of Elian, released last week by the relatives, in which the child tells his father he wants to remain in the United States. Asked what message should be conveyed to his son, the father said: "Give him a big kiss and tell him not to worry. He'll be with me soon." Reno has made it clear she wants ' to avoid any confrontation over the : boy, and even flew to Miami last week to try to broker a compromise by negotiating personally with the Florida family. But her bid failed, and both sides are now awaiting a ruling by the U.S. 11th Circuit Court of Appeals in Atlanta, which could set the stage for a resolution to the stalemate. Last Thursday, the court issued a temporary ban on Elian's removal from the United States. The court is expected to rule early this week on whether the ban should stay in force until a May 11 hearing stemming from the Miami family's lawsuit in the case. firm Dayton-based Reynolds will continue to play a major role with MSN CarPoint. Reynolds also provides the automotive industry with products such as AutoNotice electronic service reminders. Reynolds is a strategic partner with e-fin LLC, an automotive industry electronic financing marketplace. In addition, the company is working with Saturn on an integrated, real-time, Web-enabled automotive retail management system. Reynolds also is one of the founding parties of an independent company that will develop a Web-based electronic automotive parts market. "' ,'" " 'rtjt' """"'' " Bay of Pigs invasion April 17, 1961; Waco fire April 19, 1993 By Mike Williams Cat News Service MIAMI What could be a pivotal week in the long-running Elian Gonzalez saga will also be a week of painful anniversaries for the main players in the drama, with both sides hoping they won't add a new unpleasant date to their calendars. With the stalemate on hold awaiting a key court ruling, Cuban exiles will pause today to recall the failed U.S.-backed invasion of Cuba at the Bay of Pigs, a disaster that took place on April 17, 1961, leaving 200 invaders dead and 1,200 captured. The exiles have already been reminding Attorney General Janet Reno of the April 19, 1993 tragedy in Waco, Texas, when Reno ordered FBI agents to storm the compound of the Branch Davidian religious cult. A horrible fire ensued, killing about 75 Davidians. The two black days in U.S. history was taken to Miami Valley Hospital. He was pronounced dead at 7:20 p.m., his body temperature at 108 degrees. A head nurse who gave Colyer permission to play and a psychology assistant who played with the pa tients later testified they were mi aware that Colyer's medication hi terfered with the body's thermo' regulatory system. Charles Lowe, the Dayton attor ney who represented Trisdale, said he was "shocked the health provid ers here were apparently unaware of the connection between heat and ex ercise and the potentially disastrous effects for someone taking psycho tropic drugs," he said. "I was surprised we had to go to court to establish the connection." Sam Hibbs, a spokesman for the Ohio Mental Health Department, said Friday the agency will have a policy in place by May to help prevent a recurrence. Officials are also working on new guidelines for group home owners. Trisdale said she hopes word of the lawsuit's conclusion will save lives. "I hope it will for another family with a daughter, son, mother or fa ther" on medication, she said. States with heat and compounded drugs Heat-wave deaths Compounded by drug S related deaths, by psychotropic 1999, July 21 through Aug. 3 Illinois Missouri Ohio Wisconsin Kentucky 1Z7, 61 24 13 8 8 8 T Oklahoma S. Carolina Indiana . Source: County coroner and medical examiner'a offices DAYTON DAILY NEWS Carol Rubin, acting chief of the CDC's Health Studies Branch, said air conditioning is a key factor in surviving a heat wave. "It's the one overwhelmingly protective factor," she said. "Even limited exposure to air conditioning. It's part of most city heat plans." Cincinnati Health Commissioner Adcock, who requested the CDC study, said he supports Britton's legislation because a deadly heat stroke can suddenly affect those on medication without many obvious symptoms. "One of the lessons we learned is that it is not enough to simply monitor," he said. "We need a preventive strategy that would allow temperatures to be maintained appropriately." The state Department of Health, which inspects group homes, hasn't taken a position on Britton's bill. Marijean Siehl, director of public affairs, said the department is concerned that air conditioning could cost group home operators too much, that residents might squabble over the air conditioning and that the department would also have to inspect the air conditioning units. Those reservations are not serious enough, given the Britton bill's potential to save lives, said Terry Russell, executive director of the National Alliance for the Mentally 111 of Ohio. The group has a membership of more than 10,000. "This bill is way overdue," Russell said. "One more death is outrageous." JjP Trophy Nut Trophy Nut 7o.. L1IX $ BEAVERCREEK 3794 Dayton-Xania Rd. M-F 10-6, Sat. 10-B 429-1969 COURTESY OF CBS EUAN GONZALEZ IS shown in a photograph with his mother Elisabeth Brotons, in this image made from Sunday's broadcast of '60 Minutes.' have come together in the Elian saga Cuba," said Eliseo Rodriguez, a in a strange nexus, at least for the former Cuban political prisoner who exiles. has joined the protests outside "Most Americans don't know Elian's Little Havana home. "They about the history and the reality of don't understand what a big mistake Continued from Page 1A homes regulated by the state, including those occupied by people with known risks. Regulations also don't specify indoor temperatures that should be avoided by home owners and operators to minimize dangers to residents. The CDC found that all of the dead had risk factors besides mental illness, including social isolation and no air conditioning at their residences. None of the victims had visited an official or private cooling shelter. In all, eight of the 17 had mental problems, the CDC said. In the Dayton area, three of six heat-related deaths involved victims on 'medicines, according to the Montgomery County Coroner's Office. All three were younger than 65. They were: Jeffrey Hodge of Xenia, 24, who died days after his case manager helped him move into a second-floor apartment without air conditioning; Malcom Lunderman, of Kettering, 50, who lived in his own home but did not turn on his air conditioning; and Betty Lou Dotson of Dayton, 59, who lived without air conditioning at Ludlow Manor-Moraine Apartments, a federally-subsidized downtown Dayton apartment complex for the elderly and disabled. The Montgomery County Health Department's warning on heat emergencies now includes language warning people who use psychotropic medicines. Ohio's 24 fatalities prompted Ohio Rep. Samuel Britton, D-Cincinnati, to propose a bill requiring air conditioning in group and nursing homes and assisted living centers. The bill also requires air conditioning in housing for those older than 65. House Bill 474 is awaiting action in the house Health, Retirement and Aging Committee. The CDC report recommended an emphasis on tracking people at risk and increasing outreach, tightening regulations to limit temperatures in assisted care facilities, and providing more training for those who deal with heat-sensitive people. Trophy Nut Trophy Nut All. Reynolds: Company to buy Philadelphia-based may be paid out over three years, based on performance. With the acquisition, Reynolds will create Reynolds Transformation Services. HAC provides Internet sales strategies and services through Cyber Car. The company's Automark provides integrated Web-based services such as Web hosting and site design. HAC's Loyalty Management University offers programs designed to increase sales and the company also helps dealerships better manage their customer base and provides lease renewal support tools and presentation software. Continued from Page 1A e-business leadership in the auto motive industry. The deal was born at an e- commerce conference in October during a meeting between Mita and Lloyd "Buzz" Waterhouse, Reynolds president and chief operating officer. Mita said he envisioned a strategic partnership, not a sale. He changed his mind because of Reynolds' commitment to automotive retailers, Waterhouse's breadth of e-commerce knowledge and the culture at Reynolds. HAC was founded in 1981 and boasts "consistent, double-digit growth," Mita said. The company employs about 370 people, all of whom are expected to be absorbed by Reynolds. Roger Penske, chairman of Penske Capital Partners, holds a "significant interest" in HAC but officials declined to specify his ownership share. Mita has been nominated to fill an open seat on the Reynolds board. The purchase price is to be $108 million in cash and approximately 1.2 million common shares. 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