Dayton Daily News from Dayton, Ohio on April 1, 1994 · 7
Get access to this page with a Free Trial

A Publisher Extra Newspaper

Dayton Daily News from Dayton, Ohio · 7

Publication:
Location:
Dayton, Ohio
Issue Date:
Friday, April 1, 1994
Page:
7
Start Free Trial
Cancel

DAYTON DAILY NEWS FRIDAY, APRIL 1. 1994 33 Metro State 7i n Stademt goes to pop money Church's Fried Chicken donating an additional $500. The restaurant chain also announced that on Monday all Church's outlets in Montgomery County will donate 10 percent of their sales to the gun buy-back program. But the program is also going in new directions. The Rev. Raleigh TrammeD, president of the Dayton chapter of the SCLC, said Schear's Metro Markets will donate $25 grocery coupons as a way to compensate gun owners. The SCLC program has traditionally relied on cash payments, but the grocery coupons are comparable to pro grams in other cities that provide toys or other merchandise in exchange for guns. The next buyback will be from noon to 2 p.nt Monday at the SOX! office, 2132 W, Third St Monday is the 26th anniversary of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, the SCLC's first president. Bemice Frazier, director of the Stop the Killing program, said the program has about $3,000 available to buy guns. Dayton Mayor Mike Turner called this weekend in Dayton a "Lights for Life Weekend," endorsing an SCLC program where resi By Edwim Blackwell dark DAYTON DAILY NFAS It was a small but very meaningful gesture. A special education class at Roth Middle School gave up their pop money for three weeks to make a contribution to the SCLC's gun buy-back program. The donation had special meaning coming from Roth. A Roth student, 14-year-old Renee Holston, died after being shot in the head Saturday night. The $10 check pales against the $50 the Southern Christian Leadership Conference pays for each operable gun turned in, but it speaks volumes of how upset young people are about violence. The Rev. Joseph Lowery, national president of the SCLC, was in Dayton on Thursday to accept the donatioa "I was so moved by that. They (children) may be more traumatized than we know from all the violence," Lowery said. 'They're afraid and I think these students are saying we reject that." The gun buy-back program got several boosts Thursday. The Salem Man contributed $2,000 to the Stop the Killing program, with dents and businesses are asked to ; leave their lights on from 6 p.m. to- night through midnight Sunday to deter violence. ; The Combined Health District ; of Montgomery County and the 1000 Black Male Summit have: called on area residents to have a ; violence-free weekend. A commu-" nity gathering will be held at 6 p.m. ' Saturday at Shiloh Baptist: Church, 3801 Fairbanks Ave. ; Dayton School Superintendent James Williams said he went to the : funeral visitations for Holston and ; 14-year-old Mistie Dixon, a Mac- Farlane Middle School student' who was stabbed to death near her I home last Thursday. ; Firebombed newspaper still on time Article maybe cause of attack 1 CINCINNATI (AP) - A weekly newspaper whose newsroom was bombed Tuesday hit the streets as usual Thursday. ; "Herald Firebombed," the ; Cincinnati Herald reported across the top of page one in Cits first edition since the ; bombing. William Spillers Jr., the - Herald's publisher, had vowed that the newspaper would meet its deadlines and continue publishing. "Freedom is the right to tell people what they do not want to hear," the newspaper said in a front-page quote from British writer George OrwelL Fire Capt. Lacey Calloway, commander of the city's arson investigation unit, said Thursday his investigators were following leads but had made no arrests. Someone threw an ignited bottle of gasoline through a f side window of the paper's building early Tuesday, Her-ajd officials said. The bomb started a fire that destroyed 7"" r. i CLEMATIS VINES ii n o YWu EASTER flpp S) iiues ....EcusBwnr Hi mm. h m "the newsroom, melted some 'taHunei POTTUIG SOU (o)(o)fi (2)(2). i AArrA Ann 0llHui FLOWERING1 ASSORTED BOXED BRADFORD 1 t dnKUa rtKcNulALs PfcAK TKfcfc 1.' Tl"1W''-'.'j m Motion Mist praoupon it ami of purcnnt SOaABS! HIGH POWER INDOOR INSECT F0GGER l 2 m IBs) FLOWERING SHADE ff ASSORTED DWARF mil DOGWOOD TREES FRUIT TREES Hp " tf!395 tffi97 ft ffi97 FIT 2 KHOKTOUSE 95 i-n-YOURSELF 2 J III wa TURF BUILDER LAWN FERTILIZER TOP SOU. 3 j TRIOX KILLER 93 TOP SOIL ORGANIC PEAT OR COMPOSTED GRASS & WEED KILLER rW 1 TOE - 195 MANURE 10-10-10 LAWS & GARDEN FERTILIZER equipment and burned historic editions of the newspaper, which serves the city's black population. It has published since 1954 and has a : circulation of about 25,000, Spillers said. , Staffers used other areas of the building to get this , week's edition out. The attack came a day after a caller threatened violence over a guest writer's column that questioned why blacks identify with the Islamic religioa "You can't help recognizing the threat," said Herald reporter Deanna Mack, who wrote the front-page story about the bombing. "But you try not to think about it andjustdoyourjob." The federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms has joined the investigatioa U.S. Rep. David Mann, D-Ohio, sent a letter Wednesday to Attorney General Janet Reno asking that the firebombing be investigated as a possible hate crime. Michael Burks, who wrote last week's article "Blacks and Islam," said he has received death threats since the article was published. Burks said he wrote the article only to raise public consciousness. . "What I spoke about in the article was based upon research," he said. "I did not speak about my opinion. I spoke about what history has proven." In the guest column, Burks questioned why blacks identify with Islam, an Arabic religion, when blacks are not of Arabic descent. He also wrote that Arab Muslims invaded Africa in 640 A.D., committed atrocities and were the first to enslave African people. i !iiii'iLri!, to LBS. WASP & HOUET SPRAY mmm pot rose 1 GRADE VARICATED ASSORTED f F00Dj(L,J H0STA PERENNIALS fesa? ANT & ROACH ; KILLER 39 20-5-10 LAWN FOOD 97 67 Q29 E97 K-i ffl ' il rrrrifel yym stab- 18 US. 11202. 'p wumwooD HANDLES BROADCAST OR DROP SPREADER A. BROADCAST: .4 tO 8 fOOt spreading width. 50 pound capacity, t Totally enclosed gear box. KB-50P TV.'O OR THREE ARSH 58" X 50' TIRE CORD REINFORCED Oll HOSE ADJUSTABLE strea:.i TJ? umi nu 47 21 INCH co;; saw Strong tubular frame. Unique tension 4CU.FT. CCr.TXACO'S STYLE LONG HANDLE GAEN TCGLS Bow head rake. Utility garden hoe. EACH KUIMKI I f 1 SPRINKLER lUj ujii) easily. s won't burst ) EACH WHEELBARROW i 521 ci; Round point shovel. I adjusters hand grip. unaer pressure. twwiosa 601 DROP: in w b COMMERCIAL fVSim. 20 inch snreadlna Width, EDGING 70 pound capacity, industrial grade. SURE-POP POP-UP SPRAY HEAD nn Reliable, fmm low-pressure H operation. SP-25 rum Ax COMBINATION GARDEN TRUCK BAG CART 100 pound capacity. For 3, 5,&7 bushel bags. IW i coupler Accurate nyw control system. 209 mi i i iuwr fk included. 07220 A 02 b nu POP-UP IMPULSE SPRINKLER : Ml 5'X25' WEED3L0CK Lets In 3 times more air & water through the SHI Court orders resentencing for swindler M Spacing from 25 to 43 feet apart I mmntm raDric wniie Keeping weeds out. moo UMitiMWUEWl ILC-108 Mi Mcculloch 10" CUT TRKER n Msm GAS STRING TRI""ER 28cc gas engine, electronic Ignition & multl-posltlon handle. Trims and edges thick grasses and weeds. Assist handle adjusts without tools. f fJ Plants are I g0i "MOBdtlonallu rty ouaranteed to I 51256 121 33 4.5 HP " 's w one mr I 282 S.5 HP 5 HP 22" CUT CONVERTIBLE MULCHING nOWER 22 Inch side discharge cut. Mulching kit Installed. Full folding handle with comfort grip. Seven position height adjuster. 21" CUT CONVERTIBLE KIRCH HMCHER 21" push rear bag. 9 position height Full baffles. 8" bar tread wheels. . FRONT TINE TILLER 13" tine diameter with 26" till width. Chain drive with reverse. Folding handles for easy transportation and storage, SUPER BLOWERVAC More powerful than any other electric or gas hand-held unit. Three machines In one-yard blower, leaf shredder and vacuum. rroui tne date of I purchase or iva'i I replace them I mm r 51575 w I52 Bk VACUUM CANfDN,,l TIWIACIOf UAVilTOOm.1 a. tt (113-085A702 H14-415A302 21H90-502 GREENE COUNTY BUREAU Convicted swindler Stephen T. Haley of Uniontown, who is serving an 83-year prison sentence, will be resentenced. The action comes by an order handed down Wednesday by the 2nd District Court of Appeals in Dayton. The court affirmed Haley's conviction on 31 counts, but ruled that "the trial court failed to remain neutral and detached in connection with Haley's sentencing," according to the Judges' opinion. Haley was convicted in June 1991 of 23 counts of selling unregistered securities, six counts of passing bad checks, one count of false representation in the sale of securities, and one count of racketeering. t At that time, investigators estimated that Haley and his accomplices had bilked as many as 400 investors in six states out of $8 million to $10 million, No date has been set for the resentencing, which will be in Greene County Common Pleas Court in front of visiting Judge James Hooper. The decision limits Haley's maximum sentence to 79Vi years and a $62,500 fine. Dayton Daily News GET IT. lv m$m hohth dayton rwim south daytoh EH iSrpi 1336 SHILOH SPRINGS s Bl 234 Vm fSra m-' BLDC-A fhi SPEIflCiOO PIKE W AT DENLINGER IN yKj 14 MILE NORTH OF Jt NORTH DAYTON X & DAYTON MALL fo) --i 3r t- - S& w Individuals, dealers ft -kr & 1 (513)837-0851 I (513)436-0195 SriSissPft p , -I i . 7. u. T... -T ' ",, 'i. nAY typographical errors.- I W i ll '1 3i ' liil I 'it ivT7Tipi tlA'L i ffiTiS ' W IVk VVtUmTJii viWTivYl VotuMmTii 1-aiTiBTXr 19 builders square inc.. 1 "H'JtHlU'l'Jiyf. Slll'JU'J.lf .M.M'Jil'J.lf ffl'l'Jf.Wllf W1'JUF rl'Jll'7.irMI'l'3f.WUf VA'L'MAUT, AD 1071 r

Get access to Newspapers.com

  • The largest online newspaper archive
  • 12,200+ newspapers from the 1700s–2000s
  • Millions of additional pages added every month

Publisher Extra Newspapers

  • Exclusive licensed content from premium publishers like the Dayton Daily News
  • Archives through last month
  • Continually updated

Try it free