The New York Age from New York, New York on January 5, 1952 · Page 9
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The New York Age from New York, New York · Page 9

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New York, New York
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Saturday, January 5, 1952
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Page 9
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mtm ad UOmga mm mmd grrftrr mm tmi rimes" . rmco av acooaa. huwi wi - m BasttA " - - a Tae Maw Vera Ax at esesty mw fhe bvm t , AffM A J . fc. w zan j. h. w fui rwvui - llliuilict, WU.TXS M. SCOT. JB. MataaTvSl?U r"iU " SATURDAY. JANUARY 5. 1952 My Favorite Text . "If .m mw beget m kmmirmd chiTaVes) save Its MMf years, mm tkmt ikm atsys mf his years mm mm?, mmd Ma mmd not mm fittmd mritk gomj, mmd mUm tkmt km mrnrnrn mm bmrimtt I amy tkmt mm mmtlmtJy hirtk U hotter tkmm me." EeeUsiaafcr 6:S. The Rev. George E. Payne. Victory Baptist Church, 990 Union Are, The Bronx. Negroes hare not prepared for foreign service and rainy other professional and technical careen, but the real problem here is that those who meet qualifications set up by the departments simply do not get appointments. ' . " , Lincoln, Howard, Atlanta and Fisk long hare been sending out' graduates with majors in political science, history and economics, which certainly fit them for beginning in foreign service. . The brutal fact is that many such graduates who have taken masters' degrees in these subjects and met all the service requirements still can't get to first base without having 10 congressmen and a senator or two nullina fdr them. A Piece of nolxum Congressman Jacob' K. Javits of the 21st New, York district has written to Presidents Mordecai W. Johnson of 'Howard ; Horace Mann Bond of Lincoln; Charles S. Johnson of Fisk, and Rufus Clement of Atlanta, suggesting, that they consider establishing special courses to fit Negroes for foreign service with the State 'Department, and recruit students for this training.'. Mr. Javits was inspired by an article in the Foreign Service journal's December issue citing opportunities for Negroes in foreign service. The congressman had been interested in the pitifully low percentage of Negroes in the service for . some time, and obtained the following statement from Carlisle H. Humelsine. "Unfortunately we have had few Ne - groes to prepare themselves sufficiently for the Foreign Service and therefore not a large number have been successful candidates. The department - welcomes applications from Negro candidates with positive, view of appointment of well prepared and well qualified candidates. "In my opinion the articles in the Pittsburgh Courier did not bring out that the fundamental . reason for the proportionately ' small - number of - Negroes in the Foreign Service is the result of the very few qualified Negro applicants seeking - .jobs in the Foreign Service rather than discrimination , - against Negro applicantsby the department. ' "We have encouraged and received lists of outstanding Negro leaders from "He wo organizations to be considered ; for appointment in the department. ' We have these names in our current files lor consideration. "Thev are not applicants for positions in the Foreign Service however, but are , suggested as possible outstanding candidates for consideration of any position available for which they are found qualified" v V " ; . " Humelsine, innocently or not, has handed Mr. Javits a piece of pure ho - . Tht fru - t i that In the State De partment and most other Federal der partments appointing officers do not want male Negro professionals unless their own futures are endangered by discrimination. ' ' - Federal appointing 'officers have the privilege of calling' up three eligible from civil service lists for any vacant nosition. Too, in many cases, they can and do make temporary appointments. I - m mm . - . . a il This often enaoies tnem to appoint tneir friends or friends of persons who can help or harm their own advancement. It is true that in proportion to whites, Better Late Than Rochester's superintendent of schools, James M. Spinning, has banned the. children's book. "Little Black Sambo," from school libraries after protests from the NAACP there. . That is good.' It would have been better if Spinning had eliminated the book without pressure. CcaaCor Craclipot Cpcalxc. IGftfUu VHXT lTVU5 COONTR.Y COMING - TO? Pl$&RK6&FUL !AAMtlE HAVING A COLORED I JUDfrE PfcE$PlN4V OVER. THAT POOR. WH I WOMAN CASE. ? HOW ) R.ED I aaaamnwsnTatfBaaansBnnwaWJtaa'' I n IRealin.. ODE IPoflSdncs tf t D. T ALLEY HTH AO. SHENANIGANS: Much bitter - neas Is be Ins expressed In Harlem political Croupe over the experience of Parole Commissioner Fitzgerald Phillips, ex - president of Assemblyman Hulaa Jack's New Deal Democratic duo. As this department revealed last week, Phillipa resigned from the club as a protest, against the strong 'preferment - of Carson DeWltt Baker, who is being pushed by leader Hulaa Jack for a Judgeship. Phillipa worked like a horse for Jack's club, and other club workers are looking ob with dismay. Phillips appears to be being" thrown aside like an old shoe for a ' comparative newcomer In wealthy, aggres - sive Carson DeWltt Baker. Unless every political club - member Is to feel that ' his hard work in building am organisation eounta for nothing against the 'other qualifications of newcomers, the Assemblyman should make a public statement answering Phillips' allegations in his publicized letter of resignation. " What oeramttmenU Baker has with Jack and vice versa are to this writer, but one fatn - psrtaat neetios is being naked by many: Hulan Jack Is sacrificing Com mlssioner Phillips to satisfy the judicial aspirations of Carson DeWitt Baker, did he also sacrifice the community in the same interests a few weeks back, when he came out for anti - Negro Paul Fitzpatrick to continue as N. Y. State Democratic Chairman, thus keeping in 'good with County Leader . Carmine De - Sapio, in . return for 'help with Baker! resigned without Roe's OK just does not make sense. Taylor opposed Sullivan In the election, and when the latter waa ae - . f emted he naturally resigned at Sullivan's request. Not only was there no other course to take, but everyone concerned was well aware of all the circu instances Involved. - Althewgh Maya IntpeDltterl is working eieeety with Koo la Qoeena, thin Is one eeaaien when he eneoid take a leaf eat of his Maahattan hook, and appoint the first Negro anaglstf to front Que tail. It Is known that the Mayor Is sansldering this eeoiee. and ho should nmt anew petty tatrigne on n ehibbinss level to deflect him from this INTKIQCE IN QUEENS: The expected reappointment of ex - Asst. DA Westervelt Taylor folowing expiration of DA Sullivan's term of office has not transpired, and both friends and foes of the popular attorney are both puzzled and concerned. Taylor did a loysl and conscientious Job for the organ - hmtion, and took the proper stand whenever called upon to do so. Now he is receiving a lot of double - talk from Queens Boas Roe. The complaint that Taylor should not have BJCPCBUCAN PLANS - TAKX SHAPE Getting set to cash In on Negro disappointment at the double - cross on Truman's civil rights program, the Republican top brass are making a determined bid to capture the Negro and the 'floating' labor vote. As the first step In this program . Congressman Javita - is heading New Tork City campaign strategy for Dewey and the "We Want Ike" - organization. Working closely with Javits is his Harlem PR man, John Silvers, who expects to spend considerable time In Washington DC front here on in. The Elsenhower strategy now appears to be a build - up for Stassen, to split party support for Tart cleanly down the middle. Then Eisenhower would move in as the obvious compromise candidate. Nobody Intends to let the General become a controversial political figure under any cirainstancea, tf K can be avoided. Although it la now obvious that Elsenhower is a definite candidate, his only commitment Is believed to be bis answer to Truman's point blank inquiry before he took on the European chore. T will not ask, but I win not refuse". (Eisenhower also made a definite commitment that be would not run against Harry Truman). WASHINGTON KUMOS: The biggest whisper of the week is that Republicans are keeping. on Ice a fantastic black - market scandal involving a well - known Harlem figure and a member of the President's staff dealing with Government procurement. ' ItCttc? Dors from Our Readers 1 HI ISNT GOING Am 1 glad to see leap year roB around! Man. I ant going to have myself a - ball with all these fine chicks running after m la USX It's going to be some fun list i lug to their proposals, Jivs and prom - Ises in trying to get . me to surrender my freedom and happiness. Sure, IT! listen and accept an favors they will give, but brother, IT1 be one. piece of bait that wiU go for no hook In 82. JACK (LOVER) PETERSON. Eight Ave. MIODU CLASS HOUSING The "forgotten man" in New Tork City' bousing plans Is certainly the middle - class wage earner. Up to now. all of the blueprints and plana drawn by the city fathers call only for boosing relief for persona In the so - called low Income brackets. It is my wish for 1953 that some enterprising private builders will remember that moat of the city's population falls neither In the low income class nor the wealthy group bracket, but needs bousing relief as acutely as any group of New Yorkers. Here's to better housing conditions for everybody in 1952! JAMES E. EDGERTON. Bradhurst Ave. rJrSo Tidrinston Days YOU WOULDN'T DO THIS: ' A friend of mine has a son 13 years old. He is far more interested in the things he likes to do than the chores his mother gives him, and she calls him dumb and useless. IW KNOW THIS: - Children entering their teens have a hard time making the change from childhood to the age in which responsibility must begin. Be patient and atnderstanding. Calling them dumb makes matters much worse. WILD OYEt JO A thousand "Hoorays" for Jo Baker. The efforts of columnist Walter WlncheU to belittle her In the eyes of his syndicated readers has,' in my opinion, boomeranged on him. I was one of hundreds who patiently waited in line last week at the Apollo to see this great artist and champion of the race. Judging from the terrific ovation that greeted Mias Baker's offerings. I am sale in saying that Mr. Wiacbell has only succeeded In endearing this wonderful personality to all of ns more thaa ever. MART LOU SHEPHERD. W. 121st SC REAL SPONSOX NOW It mad - my blood boil to read that "cheap skate's boastful letter last week about bow he had dished his - girl friend" until after Christmas because she wanted aa expensive gift. Bet you the big - hemrted beggar has been on the receiving end oil through lSSL I met one of his stripe two years ago, and now he's still on his knees trying to get me back. But, lta too late, Ive got a real sponsor MART - THE - MINK - WEARER. Lnox ave. 5 13 TO

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