The Los Angeles Times from Los Angeles, California on March 30, 1988 · 54
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The Los Angeles Times from Los Angeles, California · 54

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Wednesday, March 30, 1988
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54
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8 Part III Wednesday, March Ml 19S J Coo Angeles Slimes U.S. Amatour Boxing Tournament BO Riddick Bowe Is Back, and He's a Heavy Favorite What had happened was that Adams' patience with Bowe had snapped. So had Pat Nappi's. Nappi, a U.S. national coach and former Olympic coach, was also in on the beef, as Adams' ally. The rap on Bowe is that a coach almost needs a cattle prod to get an honest workout out of him. On the plus side, he's one of the country's most exciting amateur boxing prospects, a medal contender for the Seoul Olympics. But one more blowup like the last one and the 6-foot 5-inch, 220-pound Bowe may be a professional boxer long before anyone had expected. Some pro trainers see in Bowe a prospect who may one day be a challenger for Mike Tyson's heavyweight title. And why not? They're from the same Brooklyn neighborhood, Brownsville. Bowe established himself as a world-class amateur last August, at the Pan American Games in Indianapolis. In the most exciting bout of the tournament, he lost the gold medal super-heavyweight bout to a much more experienced Cuban, Jorge Gonzales. Bowe is a heavy favorite here this week to win the U.S. super-heavyweight championship, and qualify for a berth in the Olympic Trials at Concord, Calif., July 5-10. Bowe started fast in the tournament Monday night. Near the end of a 50-bout, 3-ring card, Bowe knocked out an Atlantic City, N.J., lifeguard, James Ernst, in the first round. On Tuesday night, in the second round, Bowe drove a 6-7 opponent, Tevin George of New Orleans, into the ropes with a combination. Dazed, George settled into a sitting position on the bottom rope and took the full count from referee Marco Sarfaraz. Bowe faces Kevin Ford of Houston tonight in the quarterfinals. sical performance during a sparring session with Louisiana superheavy Tevin George of Louisiana. Adams barked. Bowe barked back. The exchange grew in volume and richness of adjectives. Then, the Olympic team coach took command. "You're outta here, Riddick," Adams said. "Go to the dorm and pack." Recalled Bowe the other dayi "The next thing I knew, someone was handing me a plane ticket, and I was on a plane back to New York." Bowe is back in Colorado Springs for the national amateur boxing tournament. His dismissal from an Olympic-year training camp sent shock waves up and down the USAABF. Shortly after, the organization's president, Col. Don Hull, was on the phone, wanting to know what had happened. ByEARLGUSTKEY, Times Staff Writer COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo.-Fisticuffs were out of the question, since it was a major mismatch. One combatant would have been a 47-year-old bantamweight, the other a 19-year-old super-heavyweight. Instead, it ended with heated words and the prompt issuance of a plane ticket home. That's how the bantamweight, U.S. Olympic boxing Coach Ken Adams, showed everyone who's in charge here. The incident occurred last December, at a USA Amateur Boxing Federation workout at the U.S. Olympic Committee Training Center here. About two dozen boxers were on hand, hoping to be selected for a team about to leave for competition in Cuba. One of the United States' best amateur boxers is super-heavyweight Riddick Bowe of Brooklyn. Adams didn't like Bowe's lackadai KLUSZEWSKI Continued from Page 7 "I don't think he's stuck on himself," George Brett said. "I think he has an ego. I think he has a right to an ego. But he doesn't flash it around." Of all the Royals, Brett is the one who has consistently supported Jackson, before the signing and after the furor. Ironically, Brett, the El Segundo native, is also the biggest only? Raider fan in Kansas City. "For some crazy reason, after Bo decided to play football, the fans in Kansas City turned against him," Brett said. "A lot of players turned against him, too. "I thought it was great. It gave me an extra attraction to go to Raider games. I've been going anyway for the last three years. "He's having a good camp, but he had a good camp last year, too. I don't think in their wildest dreams, they expected him to play as well as he did last year. This year he's been better. He's worked extremely hard. A lot of times, I'd get to the ballpark at 8:15 in the morning and he'd already be in the cage, hitting." What else? Said Atchison: "If you tell Bo he can't do something, you're daring him. He'll do it just to prove you're wrong." Whether this will sustain him over the endless stretches of a baseball season, where the chief virtue is not so much talent as will, where the guys who prevail are the ones who can grind it out, day after monotonous day, is another question. Somewhere, probably not too far down the line, a final decision awaits. He has a $500,000 reporting bonus, as well as a $749,000 salary, waiting for him in Raider-land in October, so expect him to give football another season and then decide. Based on his lone definitive statement shortly after joining the Raiders "Baseball is the sport I'll make a career of, not football" it would seem that the Royals have the advantage, if it's close. "I think he'll have to make a decision," Brett said. "If he ever wants to make the Hall of Fame in baseball, I think he's going to have to devote a little more time. If he wants to make the Hall of Fame in football, he'll have to play a full season. Mi ;. 'I don't think he's stuck on himself. I think he has an ego. I think he has a right to an ego. But he doesn't flash it around.' GEORGE BRETT on Bo Jackson "He's shown unlimited potential in both sports, but I don't think what you saw in L.A. last year was Bo Jackson at his finest as a football player. He hadn't played football in two years. He was going against better athletes than he ever had. "He was impressive. He got the fans excited, his teammates excited. I'll never forget, I was standing on the sidelines the day he stuck ol' Harden Denver cornerback Mike Harden, whom Jackson butted over on the way to his first touchdown. They showed it five times on the scoreboard, his teammates were jumping up and down, giving high-fives." Of course, the people who have known him for years have a pretty good clue which way he's going, right? Wrong. "Our baseball coach, Terry Bras-seale, went out to Kansas City last year to watch Bo play," Atchison said. "Terry comes back and I say, 'How's Bo doing?' "He says, 'Oh, great. Bo told me he'll never, ever play football. He's so happy. His wife told me that Bo is so happy in Kansas City, he'll never go back to football' "Terry says football is over with. "Two weeks later. Bo signs with the Raiders. Terry's telling everybody Bo's solid for baseball. "Two weeks laterr Probably 24 of the first 25 ball-games I ever saw were Sox games. We were South Side types. I was a paperboy, and our circulation manager used to treat the carriers to free trips to Comiskey Park, not Wrigley Field. The Cubs might as well have been in Wisconsin. My idea of a hero was Nellie Fox, not Ernie Banks. When the White Sox never Chisox or Pale Hose, by the way-won the American League pennant in 1959, we went wild. The mayor set the city's air-raid sirens off, scaring little old ladies into thinking the Martians had finally landed. I was a little, fat, happy kid. Being fat in Chicago has never been a handicap, so don't feel sorry for me. Chicago has always loved the fat. Back then we had Mayor Daley, Sherm Lollar, Ray Meyer and Early Wynn. Later years would bring William Perry, Roger Ebert, Rick Reus-chel, Oprah Winfrey, Wilbur Wood, LaMarr Hoyt, Greg Luzin-ski, Steve Dahl, Harold Washington and Herman Franks. Chicago is fat city. We went to Comiskey and ate the great fried chicken and the tostadas and the hot, sugared fried dough and the Italian ices and the sausage-and-pepper sandwiches, and we jammed ourselves into our seats to cheer for the Sox. Usually, they'd lose. Sometimes, they got hot. They had a team in 1977 that was as much fun as any club I have ever Qc8b intimidating figure who cut the sleeves off his baseball jersey because of his massive arms. In an ironic and colorful twist to that 1961 season, Angel Manager Bill Rigney roomed Kluszewski with the 5-5 Pearson, the biggest and smallest Angels. The good-natured Kluszewski was said to have told Pearson that he could use a dresser drawer as his bed, and, in fact, reportedly attempted to put Pearson in it after coming in late one night. Kluszewski spent eight seasons as the Reds' first baseman and was a National League All-Star from 1953 through '56. A .298 career hitter, he had his best season in 1954, slugging 49 homers and driving in 141 runs. He spent two seasons with the Pittsburgh Pirates and two more with the Chicago White Sox before bowing out as a member of the Angels. His death Tuesday night was announced by a spokesperson at Bethesda-North Hospital in Cincinnati. Funeral arrangements are pending. dogs, and I will personally come to St. Petersburg and throw oranges at anybody who enters the on -deck circle. Don't you dare move my team. You leave the White Sox right where they belong. You can put them in some suburb, if you have to, but don't go to Florida. It's too hot down there. The spring's OK, but not the summer. Fans will rise to their feet for a 7th -inning stroke. What is Chicago coming to? First lights at Wrigley Field; now the St. Petersburg White Sox. Madness. If this keeps up, I am going to start telling people I grew up in California. 1 Open MONDAY through SATURDAY 10:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M. Continued from Page 1 "You know, we had the biggest and littlest on that team. We had guys like Klu and Steve Bilko and Bob Cerv, who weighed a ton together. Then we had little Albie Pearson. It was just a couple years ago that Klu came to one of our old-timers' games and we reminisced about all this." Selected by the Angels in the 1961 expansion draft, Kluszewski hit 15 homers and drove in 39 runs in 107 games, then retired to operate a restaurant that carried his name in Cincinnati. He eventually returned to baseball as a batting coach with Cincinnati's Big Red Machine teams from 1970 through '78, when he became a hitting instructor in the Reds' farm system. He had a heart attack in 1986 and subsequently underwent a triple-bypass operation that curtailed his baseball activity. Signed by the Reds out of Indiana University, the native of Argo, 111., became famous for his style and substance. At 6-feet 2-inches and 260 pounds, Kluszewski was an been around. They had Oscar Gamble and Richie Zisk and Roadrun-ner Ralph Garr and Francisco (Frankie) Barrios, and they kicked butt. They won 90 games that season, and turned the town upside down, introducing curtain calls after home runs, and singing "Na na na na, hey hey hey, goodby!" after every win. In time, I lost track of the White Sox, and they became just another team. My professional objectivity grew. By 1983, when they won 99 times, I was almost blase about it. Their loss to the Orioles in the league championship series didn't upset me at all. It was only the other day, when Jerry Reinsdorf and Eddie Ein-horn, the owners, threatened to take the franchise from Chicago to St. Petersburg, Fla., that my in-sides caught fire. Maybe that's the trouble. Maybe people should care more. Maybe we shouldn't wait for a businessman to come along and treat our favorite team like a business. Rein & Ein, whom George Stein-brenner once referred to as Abbott and Costello, want a new stadium built. If the thing doesn't go up in a hurry, they are going to pull a Phoenix Cardinals and move the team to St. Pete, where a fancy new 43,000-seat palace awaits. In the most calm, understanding, sophisticated manner possible, let me just say this to the two owners: Over my dead body. Just try to move the White Sox, you dirty L-- in Designer SPRING SUITS $18675 Retail $355 Pure Silk SPORT COATS Retail $225 $11175 Name Brand Menswear at Wholesale or Less NinoCerruti Givenchy Adolfo Daniel Hechter Pierre Cardin Le Baron Jaymar Louis Roth Plus many, many more . . . man & hs&oddcs MENSWEAR CLOTHIERS 735 East 12th Street Downtown, Los Angeles (213) 748-8803 Sports ...We're There. PROBLEM: Joseph Kim is a real estate salesman for Merrill Lynch. He is a young aggressive new sales rep. He tries very hard to sell their listings, but has found 95 of his time is wasted. Why? Introductions of property, counter offers, in & out, back & forth, up & down. Final results, loss of the deals because customers change their minds. He is in a slump!! SOLUTION: One of the Copierland Fax sales reps advised him to lease Xerox 7021 broadcasting plain paper Fax. He purchased it. Mr. Kim selected 100 major Japanese, Chinese, & Korean investment customers. To Mr. Kim's surprise he found that 90 of these rich real estate investment businessmen already had a Fax machine. Everyday he sends listing information and his newsletters in Japanese, Chinese, & Korean languages. Believe it or not there is a dramatic breakthrough, a dream come true, in the amount of transactions. Now, his 1988 goal for the year is !6 million dollars in his hand. His age is 26. Like your son or your daughter. Why waste your golden time. You are not a deliveryman, or counter offer messenger. Plain paper Fax communication has been approved by the U.S. government for legal papers. One more thing about chemical paper Fax. PROBLEM: The Chicago law firm of Valensi, Avalons, Harada had major clients in Los Angeles. They depended entirely on Express Mail, Telex, and telephones for crosscountry communications. These proved time-consuming and inefficient to the extent that some clients were lost. SOLUTION: They bought a FAX-MAIL from Copierland branch in Chicago, and immediately achieved message transmission (with signatures and instructions) capabilities. They also rented additional FAX units for their major clients in Dallas, Phoenix, Los Angeles, and elsewhere. They proved so time-efficient, they were able to expand their law offices in Los Angeles as well. MINOLTA 50.. $895 XEROX 1020.. $995 SHARP UX30.. $545 SHARP UXB0. . $995 SHARP UX HO. $945 PACTEL 6000 $1299 TOSHIBA 30100 $1095 NEC NF14... $1299 XEROX 7010. $1450 PANASONIC 115 $1345 CANON PCS . $444 CANON PC5.. CANON PC25 . SHARP Z50 .. SHARP Z70 .. 1460 $795 $545 $750 TOSHIBA 3301. $895 RICOH M 10... $795 MINOLTA 50.. $895 Success Story of DREAM FAX MACHINE DOWNEY Continued from Page 1 bad as they can get. Two gentlemen who happen to own my favorite team are threatening to move the entire franchise lock, stock and bottle-barreled bats to another city. They sound perfectly serious, too. Color me nervous. Throughout recent seasons, there have been misconceptions, even among my closest friends, as to the identity of my favorite team. Some figure Cleveland, because hanging on the Indians' stadium walls are giant reproductions of my columns in the Sporting News, picking them every year to win the pennant. Others figure Detroit, because I used to live there. Some figure Los Angeles, because I live there now. Some figure the Angels, because they doubt that I am cool enough to like the Dodgers. Most assume it is the Cubs, because they know that I grew up near Chicago. They also know that I hold membership in the Emil Verban Society, a loyal order of Cub fans, with my official membership number falling right between Justice Harry Blackmun and Tom (Happy Days) Bosley. Sorry. Afraid not. I must fess up at this point that my team is the Chicago White Sox, and has been since my boyhood. If It's Happening In facsimile EnuptiEWT 1 Sellinn Plain Paper Facsimile in the U.S.A. XEROX 70Z Telecopier DUKacasiing Antn ummH ml M59.. Reduction 64, 82 11x18 size original Instead of mail or messenger receiving information 1-2 days later. Now every 10 minutes, the changes of information & new ideas are received. How many business owners have serious problems with communicating their messages & information to customers, associate branches, vendors, dealer manufacturers, etc. using mail or phone systems? Mail or phone system is an 100 yr. old system. Now, 1988, it is mandatory you change your system. After installing the automatic broadcasting Fax do you know how our sales increased! Without the expansion of our branches. This is unbelievable, a miracle gold mine. Pays for itself over 1000 times. Xerox 7021 broadcasting plain paper Fax machine with computer hook up. Fax connection through the computer. Now each branch has their own Xerox 7021 plain paper broadcasting Fax. Send information anytime. Everyday over 100 major clients & sales agencies, marketing, product information & newsletters. This Xerox broadcasting plain paper Fax is the automatic telemarketing dream machine. Come to our nearest Showroom! A Dream Come True! Seeing is Believing! See your Gold Mine, the Xerox 7021 Fax. Learn how to use with a Free Consultation & Free Demonstration! MODEL, $ LOWER x Canon FAX PHONE 20 t4 4 APAII 11 IIHUU This WMk onl I IUU whlli they list! f sports! FACSIMILE EQUIPMENT PAYS FOR ITSELF. 1 Million Fax Sales Projection 1988. The Fax of Business Life PROBLEM: California's Copierland, one of the country's fastest -growing office automation. No. I automatic copier & fax dealer in the U.S.A., had severe problems with inventory control, sales, reports, delivery-dispatching, service control, as well as a host of other problems, throughout its 13 branches during its formative years. But a special important thing with 13 branch managers & employees was the marketing and managing information communication traffic jam. Now every 10 minutes new idea come out. New products, new marketing information. But using the regular fax to send to 13 branches takes 1 hour. Mail or messenger takes 1-2 days. Wasting time. This was a serious pain in the neck. This communication traffic jam. How do you fix this traffic jam? Build a new freeway? SOLUTION: Dream Fax Broadcasting Xerox 7021 machine, installed Dec. of 1987 in the headquarters. The changes were immediate & incredible. Everyday, anytime, automatic sending to 13 branches & IS depts.. President's, marketing, accounting & service messages go within 1 S seconds to 25 or 100 places. Copierland No. 1 USA Fax specialist Introduces lor the first time In U.S.A. $598.00 Sharp Personal Fax Telephone lor your desk. Come In now and see. Compare Sharp, Canon, Ricoh. Your checkbook will know the difference. DRIVE A LITTLE, SAVE A LOT NO. 1 FACSIMILE SPECIALIST USA FAX UNDER ONE ROOF CopierLand Call now 1-800-USA-4FAX Coplerlind ClMiilfr: 821 E. Broadway 818-956-5988 1-800-USA-MITA IA: 909 S. Vermont (213) 386-1666 WMlWMd: 1850 Sepulveda (213) 478-4808 MmIww Pirk: 2120 S. Atlantic (818) 281-2200 LA. WmIwi: 616 S. Western (213) 386-8282 Ortie 1950 Anaheim (714 ) 535-3000 Sktrmi Oiki: 15004 Ventura (818 ) 990-4977 SMlwiirilil: 1111 E. 3 St. (714) 381-1585 Tirzim: 18555 Ventura (818) 881-5172 Tirmci: 16402 Hawthorne (213) 214-4636 Wetfliki: 30101 Agoura Rd., S. 215 O 889-4858 VMtin: (805) 654-1377 QardMi: (213) 538-0003 ENTER v (J. - THE fW '10,000 xk -w " ((CHEVROLET TEST DRIVE) ' NT SWEEPSTAKES V q w ! X SOtTHIHN CAUKXNIA 5t , X cm vikxft dc alms fsf L ffUflg.: - , Vicki Sepulveda won. You could too! A winner every 10 days. You could be the next lucky $10,000 winner. Just test drive any new Chevy car, truck or van. There's no obligation; nothing to buy. If you're at least 21 years old with a valid drivers license, see your participating Chevy Dealer now for official rules. Vicki Sepulveda of Westwood thought it was too good to be true when she won $10,000 in the Southern California Chevrolet Dealer Association's $10,000 Every 10 Days Test Drive Sweepstakes. All she did was visit her Chevy Dealer, test drove a new Chevrolet and entered. Mail-in entries available from dealer on request SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA CHEVROLET DEALERS ASSOCIATION

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