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The Atlanta Constitution from Atlanta, Georgia • 74

Location:
Atlanta, Georgia
Issue Date:
Page:
74
Extracted Article Text (OCR)

iiiihf i-tahaiilirtitifi 1 tl iMftftl'6rtrmyAt4iriili1iiiilli Mi in-. i U' it- 7 4 A Chewbacca Princess Leia (Carrie Fisher), C-3PO (Anthony Daniels) and Han Solo (Harrison Ford) in the cockpit of the Millennium Falcon. i Stars Continued from page 2) More than Hamill's dialogue has been de-, veloped for "Empire." He spent months doing' kendo (Japanese, sword play) and weight-training. "They originally wanted me to do the Yoda scenes with my shirt off. The-re're some weird ground rules in this particular galaxy no buttons or undershirts." However, Hamill felt he was already self-conscious enough, with or without his new muscles, to play the scenes shirtless.

He does almost all his own stunts "there are only three shots that aren't me" -including a highly dangerous sequence in which he dangles from a 9-inch-wide ledge. "There were all kinds of people there to catch 'uh on the first bounce if I fell, but I could've cracked my nose or something, and that would've meant the difference between a sum- 1 1:7 if it. films: Michael O'Donoghue's "Mondo Video" and the soon-to-be-released, "The Blues Brothers" with Dan Aykroyd and John BelushL Of all the stars, she seems the most relaxed and offhand, a far cry from her inter viewing style three years ago at the tender-age of 20. "I've been working on it," she says. "I went to Confidence School U.

"Before, I felt I was required to answer every question. Do you think you'll get married? Or, why is 'Star Wars' such a hit? I thought I had to be an expert on all the vari- mr4l 'Star Wars' solved was the problem with movies." Having made that rather on-target observation that "Star Wars" brought fun back to the movies Ford moves to the next table in this seemingly endless round robin of interviews. As his handsome profile retreats in the distance, a female reporter from an upstate New York paper sighs and says, in not-so-hushed tones, "Now, to him I'd write a pornographic letter." suits, luis urae, i ueciaea i coma say, i aon i know or I don't know how they worked Yoda. I'm as much of an audience to much of the film as anyone, else." She munches her oatmeal cookie and takes a long drag off her cigarette. "We work without half the stuff.

You see the stars and the asteroids; we're looking at the camera crew or a piece of tape." In the previous film, she was supposed to react to the destruction of her home planet Lucas told her to think, "Gee, there goes my whole record collection." In "Empire," one of her biggest emotional moments is watching a spaceship take off with a captive Han Solo (Harrison Ford). "I was looking at a pole," she sighs. "I had to evoke some kind of emotion for a pole. "It takes tremendous concentration and imagination and a willingness to be foolish in front of the crew. Luckily the atmosphere on set Is conducive to doing that" Like Hamill, she feels "Empire" offers her character some room to grow.

There's the beginning of a romance between her and Han which she describes as "Tracy and Hepburn or Bogart and Hepburn in The African They argue, argue, argue but clearly are at- A. 1 It ML I Carrie Fisher met auu a vmiauiiaa icicaw. uvci jruuug i could do, though, I wanted to do. It's a combination of pride and ego." He likens "Star Wars" to doing children's theater, "except the response comes three years later. When I come to New York, I'm always reminded how far: I've gotten away from my beginnings on stage.

You can't relate to 'Star Wars' being seen by millions of people. You just can't" Harrison Ford OF THE THREE principals, 38-year-old Harrison Ford has done the most work between episodes. He starred in "Hanover Street," "The Frisco Kid" and "Force 10 From Navarone" and made cameo appearances in "More 1 American Graffiti" and "Apocalypse Now." "I think I had a character in the first film that had more of a general utility to people; making films than the one Mark played," is Ford's gracious way of putting it "Mark had a very difficult character, and if he hadn't Stayed him as callow in the first, he wouldn't ave had the chance to complicate him in the second. That's why he was not perceived as immediately useful as I was. But he will be.

1 St "My desire," he explains, "was to do as many different kinds of films for as many different kinds of audiences as possible between the first and second films. I chose the films I did purely on the opportunity that was available. That opportunity had a temporal scale. So I did some films I was pleased with and some I was not so pleased with. I always knew I had the second one to come back to." Unlike Hamill and Fisher, he hasn't found doors closed to him "or if I have, I don't, know about them.

I have no sense of "Star Wars' having cost me a thing. It's been nothing but good news." The news wasn't necessarily all good on some of his inter-episode pictures, but that doesn't unduly bother Ford. TTTTT 'HAT HAS Carrie Fisher gotten out of doing "Star "I can shoot a ray gun very well and I cot some "I haven't compared the success of everything I've done since to "Star Wars' because I didn't take its success personally. It was George's success, and I was pleased to be part of It" Ford, who was in the business IS years before his big break; would never have dreamed of becoming an actor except that he was kicked out of college three weeks before graduation. "When I thought of what I might like to do, acting is what occurred to me.

I'd done one or two plays in college, and it was the most difficult and frightening probably the only frightening thing Td ever done. It seemed a wonderful opportunity for a various and, even, colorful life. It took me IS yean of not working very much to realize what a fool I was." He smiles his devastating rogue's smile. "Now, of course, I'm right But it took IS years." The subject of fan mail comes up. Darth Vader (David Prowse) reported be gets pornographic mail Ford mostly gets "romantically inclined things.

I haven't gotten anything of lasting prurient value, but in this one, actual kissing takes place and might inspire some perverts to come out of the closet" He laughs. "I hope so." Of all the many people who have evaluated and re-evaluated the "Star Wars" phenomenon, Ford makes one of the more astute comments: "When Star Wars' came out it was at a time, in general, of films of revenge, of violence. All as a way of expiating guilt about social problems. But I never saw in any of' them a solution that was valid. "Star Wars' made available to filmmakers the possibility of doing films that are entertainment That didn't have to take on a certain social obligation.

The only problem iraciea one anouier. ane concedes more in -this one, gives Han his masculinity. She doesnt have to be in control. "And I don't feel in this one that we're second-fiddle to the hardware or are being upstaged by the robots. It's all a balance.

There's great new furniture with my per diem." In her baseball cap and knit sweater, Ms. Fisher looks more like a "Saturday Night Live" regular than the haughty Princess Leia. "I look the least like my character;" she admits. "I can go to the market and no one will recognize me. But if I want to be recognized, I just saddle up the braids." Incidentally, her famous earmuffs hairdo is less in evidence in "Empire." There trying to see how many hairstyles they can give me before I crack." Still, even with her supermarket freedom, she, too, feels the bind of typecasting.

"I can't even get into a producer's office without the hair. They won't even see me." That's not entirely true. In between Episodes IV and she's made "Come Back, Little Sheba" on TV with Laurence Olivier, been guest host for "Saturday Night Live," in which she spoofed "Star Wars," and has made two no movie without us, the humans, and no movie the other way around. There Jus to be someone in the spaceships." She admits it bothers her that her Princess is so humorless. "I don't lose sleep over, it or sob in the bath, but I'd like her to loosen up.

H-e-e-y, Leia, let's have a beer." She adds, with justifiable pride, "I did help write some of Harrison's funny lines." Empire pick up bits of information and don't know if it's a secret or not Then you say something and feel the full weight of Lucasfilm Inc. on you." Kurtz prefers to keep things quiet for several reasons: "My philosophy is I don't like visitors, press or otherwise, because they take up time and space. And we had a lot of scenes that bordered on being dangerous. Also, story elements have a tendency to wind op somewhere else. I don't think Continued from page 2S one.

He's an artificial character. There's no man in a suit (except in one long shot). "A lot of the credit for making him come alive goes to Stuart and Frank, but also to Mark, who acted with him like a real person." "I was afraid of it at first" admitted Hamill. "When we all sat down and read the script Harrison and Carrie were trading ideas about dialogue, and I had the bulk of my script with this thing that never showed up at rehearsals. But even' with all the off-camera manipulation, right at the moment of filming, it worked for me.

And I think it's working for a lot don't have to sell the public on the kind of picture it is." And certainly no one needs to be told what kind of pic Something about Darth Vader being a dark figure and Alec Guinness being God. When I saw Star I thought here we go, perpetuating the same old feelings. By introducing Lando, it makes it clear everyone is in a dilemma no matter what color they are." Still, Lucas's galaxy remains primarily white. And male. are all the women in Star Wars-Land? "Out shopping," deadpanned Carrie Fisher, who plays Princess Leia.

"Listen, I don't know. I have nothing to do with casting. Sure, I'd love to have someone to say, 'Who do ya' thlnk's cuter Kurtz Insisted 30 percent of the background extras were female and promised a more featured female character in Episode VL" Could she be the obliquely referred-to, "another hope" mentioned in passing by Yoda, wondered another, Kurtz wasn't saying. There has been a great deal of secrecy surrounding the "Star Wars" projects. Some of the actors, like Prowse, only got to see their pages of the script and, in one instance, a crucial plot twist was kept secret from the cast and crew up until the last possible moment The actors were given different lines to speak and the real dialogue dubbed In at the last minute.

"I don't mind the secrecy," said Prowse, "but I wish they'd give us some guidelines don't discuss this or that. Then you'd know where you stood. Instead, sometimes you Ulahto'Jrtrh4l1l kids. I was asked by three kids in London if Yoda was there to sign autographs." Another new character a human one Is Lando Cal-. rlssian, played by Billy Dee Williams.

Lando runs a mining colony where Han and Leia seek refuge from Darth Vader ture ine Empire siraes uacr is. However, everyone connected with it is very proud that it is not a carbon of the first picture, an approach Kurtz feels eventually doomed the Bond series. "That would've been the easiest out to make another film vaguely similar to 'Star Wars' that does the same things and ends on the same kind of triumphant note. We didn't want to do that. The idea is the three films could eventually be cut together to run as one long film.

As such, this film must end with major story elements unresolved. We knew we were taking a risk, but this is definitely the second act of a three-act y. 1 Or, as Mark Hamill, our fair-haired lad Of the future, said, "I feel like the story's just beginning to be told." The writer covers ttlm tor lie Constitution. while Luke is doing nanastanas ana rocx iot xoaa. "I was offered the role," said Williams, flashing his riverboat gambler's grin, "because I'm handsome and charming.

And I'm knocked out by that On a more serious note, he agreed that one reason the Character was introduced "and I'm glad be was" was that in Episode IV, "it was not clear what was being sail.

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Pages Available:
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Years Available:
1868-2024