The Courier and Argus from Dundee, Tayside, Scotland on June 23, 1865 · 4
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The Courier and Argus from Dundee, Tayside, Scotland · 4

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Dundee, Tayside, Scotland
Issue Date:
Friday, June 23, 1865
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4
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THE DUNDEE COURIER AND ARGUS, Friday, June 23, 1865. THE ANGUS AND MEARNS RIFLE MEETING. THIRD DAY T .5 meeting was itrdn.-lit to a close yesterday, and altogether it has jtnived a very KfliPCSesefttl aue, Tiit weather -always an important element in eon-iii -tiun with such competitions hxs throughout h .. excellent ; and the nuiiiher of e,iniietitorp who L v- come- forward to contest for tin Various prizes ! ii lieea greatly in execs oi the last two or tliroc t ,;s When the Association was instituted, a lare iiumbef of volunteers ajipcared at the Gathering, a .vious to distinguish themselves or to carry away .s wno of the numerous prizes offered. But now only ' who have acquired cimsiuerable proiicieny in r:U' shooting think of coming to the mee4nn8. so tl.it the iuereasin- number of competitori shows a fespondxng increase in the efficiency of tone various toff throughout the country. It is also highly s.a.isfactry to observe, &s was remarked ly tin i, : i 1, untenant yesterday, that some of the bet -eie shooting that has ever been regUtert-d has been wad at this meeting; and when the annual pjjiort of the National Kille Association is published, we v. .sure the Angus and Moanis Association will 0 uj.y a distinguished position in this respct. ' Her the despatch of our parcel nn Wednesday narht, a dispute emerged with regard to the competi- 1 between the North and the South .if th Forth ' ' the Cup presented t the soc:ati a in 1 Mil bv the late Major Moir, of Le. kie. As we in c u t i . i ic-1 5 -tcday, there were not a sulh it nt number of i .'men on the gr un 1 to form a squad to represent ' 1 e South, and a party was aceordingl) made uj . and j,.;t under the charge of Mr Edward Koss, to tire for i P Si -ssion of the Cup. They were divided into two ! s rj ids, the first being under the immediate charge ' Mi Ross, while tbe others tired at a different I I argot. In the published regulations it was stated 1 V at ten shots were to I tired at each range; but M i iioss decided that only seven shots should be tired ' at the different ranges. Through aom; taa 1 vertem-? tJiis was not otnnmnieateu to the secoud squad, wl.-.h comprised Captain Mitch. 11, of Alloa (North). Captain Fairholme, Lauder lale, and Mr 1 Mfl ics, Jvlmlmrgh (South) j and tie y tired ton rvndsat the sever! ranges. Th- laTfe-r jeatlcinea - to Mr lbtei makii!.: any ciia:ire on the pub-! d programme They further sulcnitte 1 to the v ;.p ires that the first named squad, though they f,t. 1 only seVki: sh"ts fr the net h. were a!o iting for the simultaneous small bore competition v 1 b.Lw, and therefore had ten registered . at each range. The following i the decision k umpire.-, on the subject : Discretion hav-iwl, atv.'.ays lcea allot cl to the pers 'u in charge of t! ii ' eh between the north and south of the Forth t modify the rules published in the nr-Kfrarairni ritng to cireum stances, it is decide I that the (-utipetition must le restricted on tiii-, asion to -h ts. an 1 that the three last sb - bo stru k oJi vhe scores of those who registered t n shots in tbe ;.. . !.. As only eight competitor instead of sixteen apjveared, some modification of the published fin' - at any rate should be made." Wu sub;. ..in the t dal scoring subject to this deeision : NoKT!I. S00 766 Ttl. -M 23 25 2(i 2ii 22 U 27 20 IS 71 b 27 2o Gs 23 ly 24 G 19 2il lij GI 24 21 16 61 23 hi 11 G i tain Mitchell, Alioa, i-. Ai 1 Ross, Eur! oi A In. rdecn, ,' u'. W. Forbes. Ellon, . ! a. reterkin, I-; . r Rx.thby, . SuCTII. 1 ... tain Fairholme, I-.r .lefii'ieS, i : i Cup was thus won by Captain Mitchell of Thi weather yesterday was vert' favourable for t1:-: .. . sro us pleasure -seekers slio crowded the Links ' Montrose, and who congregated chiefly in the - j.ibourhood of the Railway Bridge, where the ' petition in athletic games took place. There . tine cooling breeze in the forenoon, which Lrtirpbred the 6tr.ng sunshine j but this interfered i tl with the tiring. The wind blew directly 1 i ; ifi the ranges ; and, coming in sudden sharp the marksmen found it impossible t take up i a i ,urate aim. ltchoppe.l r.iuni. too, occasional! y ii manner that was very perplexing Between one , ii . , j 'clock, however, the wind fell, and th'KC hvi" ci'. layed shooting until air, r t" Lour did so at n .. L greater advantage than th sc who fire.l in the ... par: oi the day. 1 he shooting began about eight o'clock, and was t .v. bcei. concluded by about four; but chiefly i w. i . j to the blustry chat-v t i of the f .ren on, it V, t.r.donged until considerably after that h -ur: ai i it was six o'elck ere the last squad had conch; -led firing for the Stranger's Cup. Wc subjohi ti piinipal scores made yesterday, with the res.ui: cf te various competitions : STRAXirEHV ri p ' tam 12. Second Prize t'o. Third 3, Fourti: CJ. and Three fx 1 e& h Ten Shots atl' au.i IrjfJtJ yards. , n to all (Jomers oi any Nati"ii. The same eon-aitiOlis as Scotland s Cuj. 'J u Shillm-- Entrv I'ioiiy Memliers oS Associated Coinp&mes, Five Sudlings each. 900 y i.. 10.j yds 3 a i 4 3 4 4 4 3 S 2 3 3 i - i 4 3 3 3 2 ) 3 2 0 ?. 3 2 2 2 0 3 2 i 2 2 2 4 ' i 2 3 0 " 3 2 P, 0 2 ! 4 8 3 - 3 ' s 0 3 S 3 S 3 8 4 n ' 0 2 2 2 ? : 0 3 3 2 4 0 3 2 2 0 0 2 4 0 -j 0 2 0 0 2 2 3 f. 0 2 3 3 " 0 2 0 '. 0 ' ; Ellrm, 3 3 3 2 j 3 2 4 i tiicliii .UI..a, S Sa 48413 44 J (TWi Ellon, 34 3 S4 3 .". 3 i 4 t ip; Mrn.M, g 44 3S .13 iS l.ir Jann's. in, 8 SS 4 2 1 1 i 8 3 D .lertiey. E-lmburgh, 4 2 2 3 v :i o 4 4 4 E iv. .:. U,,. 23223. i 2 424 E.i: ' i .l..-nl.n. 3 4 333 "4 SJ ) J . Miluc. 3 3 2 4 4;! , I S'j Ma i Booth by, 8 3 3 4 43 a f 4 3 4 'i t'ettrltitL, 4 3 4 4 2 2 3 S & 1 THE DALHOUSIE PR! ZE -(Third Day). Given by the Eari oi l 'aihousie. First Prize, 10; ... 1 prize, 5 Ten Shots at Sun yards. fM?U to all Volunteers if the Counties of F rfar an i Kincardine, with Lniu. or SLu-t EnfieM Bines, (; . ernment Pattern, Hythe Pusition, and Wintblo-t .. Scoring. At the eji.se of this competition, it was found that Private W. Findlav, Monti .-e, had w ir. the tir- ;e;,. Ensign Walker an I "ng ant Gray were ties I . the eeqondi and on these bi am iii e.1 off, Ensmm Walker took the Sfeond plaee. Private W. Fmdlay. M-Mtr se. Ensign WalK-r. Portletnen, . S ; ant rj-ay, Forfar. Private jolui Nelson, D-.-udee, I'r. Wyflic, Montrj, John Cairnie, Durri- Si-rgeant Paterson, Dundee, . Lieutenant Davidson, Hmnghty Ferry, C rt1 Allan. 6th K.P V.. Private A. Ritchie, Lanrcm ekirk, . James Robertson, lliuitr , Private ,. Walk-r. Fettcreo, Private Moir. Montrose. W, Duivan. Dundee, Sergeant Crockatt, Laurencekirk, 32 29 29 27 2: 2" 2: 23 22 2 i 2f) 19 19 IS 17 M APPIN S CUP (TirmT) Day). Value ,'"). Presented by Messrs M Lppin i: Bro;., 222 Regent Street. London. S eond, Thhd. and Fourth Prizes of 1 each. Five shots at 2n yards. Open to all comers. To be shot for with any o - upti m of Rifle not exceeding 1" lio. weight, and Ui any position. Enfield Rities and Government Lriiine allov .: one point. Captain Mitchell, Alloa, Sergeant Lees, Perth, and the Hon. Captain Arbuthnot, were ties for this pr:ze. with a score of 20 each -the highest possible. L. shimting off the ties, Sergeant Lees took the lir.t place. Captain Arbuthnot the second, and Captain KHtnhell the third. C, ram Mitchell, Alloa, Lieut. Davidson. Broughtv Ferry, Private Jeffrey, cdiuburgn, . , - Samson, Letham, - rleant Keir, Friockheini, Mi 1amond, do., V -John Nelson. Dundee, Sir.'' ant Tan.jueray, R.R.V., I t Duncan. Dundee, W Smith, 7th K.R.V., . . I. Stewart, Frioekheini, . ' i ' 1 1! . Furrier, do. , . , GLENOGIL EGG PRIZE. Presented by J. R. Haig, E.j. oi Glenoid. Value, l'lu. Five Shots at 100 yards for each Conn.etitor. Ei ugn Walker. Portlothen, and Gunner Smith, ua ei. htru.-k thceggtwn-e each on Wednesday vv. ...ug, thus tying for the prize. No other mm-ii ' ! making an equally good score, tin y agreed to o. le the prize. E COUNTIES' CUP FOR SKIRMISHERS. (Third Day.) . luc 2"). Ten shots will be allowed to each man. Se ,i,d Prize, 5: Thinl, 3; Fourth, 2 tc be fi . ii: ca.-h (ij.cn to Associated Companies- only, i b of which may n'.minat'- eight competitors, numbers of the Company. To be shot for with long oi short Enfield nties and carbines, doverr.ment i m The followinr rules have been asreed on : ' load of lo or 12 men ic formed ir line ( i . I c rank) at six paces apart, with a target six feet Ligh and two broad, in front of bach man Tin 5 . i is placed at :k.i yards from the targets, and advance, retire, and tire by oniPr of the officer it .mmand, but never exceed the distance of 3n0 ! ' is trom the targets. Each man flre at his " target, which has a bull's eye. counting 3 P mis ;a centre, counting two points ; and the outer n U, 1 point each. In tins competition, which extended over three i mate , Scott, Rrechin. and ii. Kobertson. iath, tied for the first prize at 29 Private i: u on cue lie DuLug su'i on. a. ' KlSjar, Private Irvine, Abe deer and Cor- ponnl L iWSOn, Laiuencekirk, tied at 'S forth, other ri. -. and Private lirowu and Corporal Lawson were the winners on the ties being shot off. iB. Eves. Gents. Out. Hits 'Hs. it e RobertsDfi, Arbroath, 10 29 . bower. Montrose, 2 6 1 9 2$ Sergt, Croekat, Laurencekirk, . . 0 5 5 10 25 Corpi. W. Rodgcrs, Montrose. . .2 5 1 8 2.5 Sergt. Forbes. Ellon, . 1 4 3 8 22 John Mass.ni, Montrose, 0 ti 1 7 20 W. Smith, do., . 1 4 2 7 2U .1. 8, Cray, Forfar. . 0 4 3 7 Is Sergt. Keir, Friockheim, 0 4 2 6 16 U. Smith, Durris, 1 1 4 6 15 W. Duncan. Dundee, 0 2 4 G 14 John Nd.-on. do.. 0 4 1 5 14 A. Ritchie, Laurencekirk, 1 2 2 5 14 A N ; CJ S A N D M E A RXS CUP. Value, 15. Second Prize 3, Third 2, and Five of 1 each. Five Shots at 200 yards, standing, and Five Shots at :N) yards kneeling. pen to Associated Companies only, each of which may select not more than Eight Competitors, Mem-it.rs the 'oinpany. Competed for with Long or h -rt Enlields, (iovemment Pattern, or with Regu-lati"ii 'arbines. C ..in Walker. Dundee, and Private Bower. Mont i ise. tietl at -i for this cup. On the tic being ah. . i ill. l'ri ate Bower was found to be the winner. The third prize was won by Corporal WylUe with a peor. f 2.' ; while the following tive in order got prizes of 1 each. 200 300 n. IVivab Bower, Montrose, . 1G 15 31 Captain Walker, Dundee, . . 16 15 31 Corpora! Wyllie, Montrose, . 13 16 29 W. Duncan." Dundee, . 11 17 28 bum- Watson, Bothes, . . 12 16 28 Private G. Addison, Arbroath, . 16 12 28 Serpeant Crockatt, Laurencekirk, 12 15 27 Private Crant, Aberdeen, . . 14 13 27 Privat. Irvine, Aberdeen, . . 12 14 26 Edward Streetlv, Aberdeen, . 14 12 26 James Scott, Brechin, . . 12 14 26 W. Hoi-;. Arbroath, . 13 13 26 Sergeant W. Davidson, Private John Ross, Laurencekirk, 15 10 25 11 ate Smith, Montrose, . . 14 II 25 Corporal Clarke, Peterhead, . 12 13 25 Private John Masson, Montrose, . 15 1U 25 Private W. Dallas, Montrose, . 13 12 25 Col -Ser leant Davidson, St Martins, 15 10 ii") i'-. - W. Wyllie, Montrose, . 14 11 2") Private Wyllie, Montrose, . . 13 12 23 A. Hit chic. Laurencekirk, . 10 14 24 Gunner Collie, Montrose, . 15 9 24 Private Nelson, Dundee. . . 12 12 24 C..rporal Bisset, Forfar, . . 11 13 24 Corp .ral Maedouald, Peterhead, . 13 10 23 Kirktou, do., 14 9 23 Arbuthnot, do., . 12 11 23 l.mie- Robertson, Montrose, . 13 10 23 Lieut. Hurness, Laurencekirk, . 10 13 2' Ensign Smith, Durris, . . 12 10 22 Corporal Humphrey, Aberdeen, . 12 10 22 S. reant Maekenzie, Peterhead, . 13 9 22 (Juunor Fisher. Broughty Ferry, . 12 10 22 Private W. Findlav. Montrose, . 10 12 22 Ensi.'ii :arden, Arbroath, . 10 12 22 W. Smith, Durris. . 12 9 21 Scr.-eant Gordon, do., . 12 9 21 Private Donaldson, Aberdeen, . 10 11 21 Alex. Ugihy, Peterhead, . 12 9 -1 C r : .': W. Rodgcrs, Montrose, 14 7 21 E Smart, Brechin, . 11 10 21 Cirjoral Stewart, Friockheim, . ID 11 21 Sergeant J. S. ray, Forfar, . 11 10 21 Private Cairnie, Durris, . 8 12 2J Cnnner W. Xic tll, st Vyrm, . 11 9 20 ..n. .:aU want, Peterhead, . 13 6 19 Serjeant James Keir, Friockheim, 11 S 19 Private Forrest, Laurencekirk, .11 8 10 PnvatcP.", do., . 9 10 19 Ensi-m Proctor, St Martins, . 9 10 19 Private W. Stewart, Dundee, .11 S 19 Private D Smith. Durris, . 11 7 18 Private Moir. Peterhead, . 11 6 17 Lieut i oung, Friockheim, . 10 7 17 Sergeant Pctrie, Montrose, .10 7 17 W. Mann, 4th A.R.V., . . 14 3 17 Corjioral Forlies, St Martins, .11 6 17 Si rzeaut Littlejohn, Durris, 6 9 15 Privatt James Smith, do.. . 4 11 15 LADIES' CROSS FOR THE MEARNS. six Shots at 150 yards, Standing. Given by the Ladies of kincardineshirc. Open to all Volunteers in that County, Artillery or Rifles, with Enfield Rifles or (Government Carbines. prize, it will f 23. Hits. Total. 6 23 6 22 6 19 6 19 6 19 6 19 6 17 6 17 6 17 6 16 6 15 6 14 5 13 EmLm Walker, Portlethcn, . Private John Ross, Laurencekirk, JosC h uthlert, Laurencekirk, Si rgeant Brown, Auchinblae, . Gvorgt M'.re, Laurencekirk, . J. A. Murray, Auchinblae, A. M'Esvan, Laurencekirk, i Lieut Burness, do., I ( orporal Lawson, do., I Gunni " Nn::th. St (i'yrus, t tunnel W. Seutt, St Cyrus, . .V. Ritchie. Laurencekirk, Serjeant Croekat Laurencekirk, CAPTAIN ROSS'S CHALLENGE CUP. Seven Shots at 100 yards. ; Thir; Challenge CUiP -is presented by Captain Horatio Re--, and is ipeU only to the three best shots of each I eometition at this meeting. Shot for with any -:- ription of rirle not exceeding 10 lbs in weight. I i Inb f utr com etit"rs came forward to contest for this rize, and two of these Sergeant Lees, Perth, ami l re-at. w ilken, h.llin -retired oetore coni-pletin. the competition. The Cup has been won, it will :. seen, by Lord Aberdeen, with a score of 21 marks : 1000 Yards. Total. L ird Aberdeen 24 Captain Mitchell, .... 21 CARBINE PRIZES. . First ! Yize. 6 ; second, 3 : third to sixth, 2 each ; seventh, 1. Four shots at 100, three at 200, and three at 300 yards. This competition took place at the range near the battery. We have not received the scores, but the folio wins are the winners of the various prizes : 1, Sergeant Forbes, Aberdeen ; 2, Lieutenant Mait-laad : 3. Lieutenant Dalyell, Broughty Ferry ; 4, ( inner Fisher, Broughty Ferry ; 5, &rporal Gibson, Peterhead ; 6, Sergeant Mitchell, Kincardine ; 7, G turner Moir, St Cyrus. ABTILLERY GARRISON GUN COMPETITION. First Prize 15, Second 3, Third 2. Thi.- .mpetition took place at the Artillery Volunteer Battery, at a land range of 12iK.) yards, i ne tai -ct was of wood, white, with a black centre ; liimesirions. S feet by 12 feet; and the following S Sarh - .va- l-ipted, viz. : Right and Left Over Under 4 yards 65 varda 15 vards 5 ,, &5 85 12 ,, 105 55 All shots striking within the first marks to count 3 ., ,, second ,, 2 third ,, 1 At the close of this competition, which began abjut ten o'clock, it was found that the tirst prize was w.m by the 21 Batten' of the Arbroath Corps, with 13 points ; the second was won by the Johns-haven Company, with 11 points; and the third prize by the 7tL i oinpany Aberdeen, also with 11 points. THE REVIEW AND PRESENTATION OF THE PRIZES. By five o'clock, the hour fixed for the presentation of the prizes, there was a very large turn-out of spec-tat .rs on tlie Links. The morning trams brought in a considerable number of strangers, but the number of these was nothinglike equal to that of former years. A large number of town's people, however, were present, the afternoon beimi observed as a half-holiday. Among those near the stand wore Sir John Stewart Forbes, the Hon. Captain and Mrs Arbuthnot, Col. Kin) ieh of Kilrie, Captain Stanniforth, R.N., Cap. tain Pearson Johnston, &.C, &C. At half -past four o'clock the various artillery and rifle volunteer companies belonging to Montrose, as well as two companies from Brechin, and two de- I tachnti nts of artillery from Arbroath, assembled in 1 front of the Academy, and having been equalised 1 and proved, marched under the command of Lieu-i tenant -Colonel Reimy Tail your to the ground set a art r the Review, near the railway bridge. There we: between 200 and 300 men on the ground, and, !- - the Colonel, the mounted officers were ' Dickson, and Adjutant Herrick. At five oi ii k the Faii of Dalhousie arrived on the ground, aoeompanied by Major Guthrie, who acted as his &id -i lc-cmp. He was received with a general salute, and thereafter he inspected the battalion The dunteers marched past, first in open column, and then at quarter distance, and tney were afterwards exercised for nearly an hour in a variety of battalion movements, most of which were xecuted with wonderful accuracy and precision. At the close, they were drawn up in hollow square, wl.en Lord Dai.:ioi;sik dismounted, and most of the winner- : prizes at the Gathering having by this time assembled, he said -Volunteers of the united counties, b ire proceeding to distribute the prizes that have been shot for at this meeting, allow me to con : rtilate you upon the sixth meeting that we havi held of the Angus and Mearns Rifle Association. J aw happy to sec by the attendance to-day that thi Association has lost none of its attractions, either for those who attend for the prizes, or for those who are anxious to see the issues of the con test. It is a pleasing circumstance, also, to refer to, ' that while ur prizes js are numerous and valuable enough to attract not only those who reside and serve in our own ranks, but volunteers from a distance, our funds are also in such a state as to enable us to afford to givethese prizes. Upon the whole, I may sav that the Association is in a healthy condition ; but still, volunteers, loth far and near, it needs all your helping hands and assistance to maintain it. as there are now so many Rifle Associationsand I am happy to say so- rising in all parts of the country but what with your excellent ground here, what with the attention of the Magistrates ot Montrose, I and the good treatment we always receive at their nanus, i Deneve mere is no piace m ouuuxuu so well situated for an Association of volunteers as this is. It may be that we have not here so many men in the ranks this year a- usual, but this is to Ik attributed-to tin recent assemblage- of the volunteers of the county at Monitieth. But I am sure that all the spectators here present will unite with me in thanking those volunteers who have turned out under arms to-day, and who have shown on the small space of ground the Colonel had to manoeuvre them on an example of what a regiment may do on a larger scale. (Applause.) I shall now proceed to deliver to the successful competitors the prizes which they have won, I have the pleasing duty to announce to you that there has been better shooting at this meeting than has almost ever been witnessed at any competition of volunteers in Great Britain. Indeed, I may say that Scotland's Cup has been won by unprecedentedly good shooting. (Applause.) PRESENTATION OF PRIZES. SCOTLAND'S CUP. In presenting Scotland's Cup to the winner, Lord Dalhousie said -Sergeant Forbes, I present this Cup with much pleasure. You have won it by some of the best shooting I have ever had the pleasure of seeing on reoord, and you have had the satisfaction of beating the Champion of Fmgland. (Loud cheers.) None of the other successful competitors in this competition came forward to receive the prizes. Lord DALHOUSIE next presented the bronze medal for Forfar, with a prize of 3, to Private John Masson, Montrose ; the second prize of 2 to Gunner Fisher, Broughty Ferry ; and the bronze medal for Kincardine to Corporal Alexander Allan, Nether-ley. In presenting the Dalhousie prize of 10 to Private W, Findlav, Montrose, his Lordship said- I have great pleasure in putting the prize into your hands the more so that it has been won with the arm which you would have to bear if you were called out to serve your country. (Applause.) Captain Walker, Portlethen, next received the second prize of 5. Mrs Re.vxy TaiLYOCK presented the ladies' purse of 7 to Corporal Dallas, Montrose, and expressed a hope that he would win many more prizes. The second and third prizes of 2 and 1 were won by Corporal Wyllie and Private Bower, Montrose. The Montrose Corporation Challenge Cup, with a prize of 5, was next presented to Captain Walker, Dundee, on beh alf of ('aptain Maedouald, Dundee, who was not on the ground. The second prize of '2 was won by Mr Oswald. Perth, and the third of 1 by Mr E. Ross. Lord Daluocsie next presented the Counties' Cup for Skirmishers, value 20, to Private Geo. Robertson, Arbroath ; the second prize of 5 to Private James Scott, Brechin ; the third of 3 to Private Irvine, Aljerdeen ; and the fourth of 2 to Private Brown, Biggar. The E:;g Prize of 10 was presented to Ensign Walker, Portlethen, and Gunner Smith, Stonehaven, to le equally div ided between them. Captain Mitchell was winner of the late Major ! Moir a Challenge Cup, but he was engaged in shooting I for the Strangers' Cup. The Montrose prizes were next presented by Lord j Dalhousie. 1st, 10, Sergeant Gray, Forfar ; 2d, 5, Private Irvine, Aberdeen ; 3d, 3, Gunner Fisher, Broughty Ferry ; 4th, 2, Sergeant Robert- s n, Perth. The following gentlemen received prizes of 1 each viz. : Captain Walker, Dundee; Captain Maedouald, Dundee ; Private Clarke, Brechin ; Corporal Humphrey, AWrdeen; J. B. Brown, Biggar ; H. J rant, Aberdeen; Sergeant Mackie, Aberdeen; and Private Moir, Montrose. I The Angus and Mearns Cup, value 15, was next I presented to Private Bower, Montrose ; the second i prize, of 3, to Captain "Walker, Dundee ; the third, I of 2, to Private Wyllie ; and prizes of 1 each to tlie following volunteers James Watson, Rothes ; ' Private G. Addison. Arbroath; Sergeant Crockatt, ' Laurencekirk ; and Private Grant, Aberdeen. I lie Ladies ross for the Mearns was presented to Ensign Walker, by Mrs Fitzniaurice Scott. The tirst prize, of 0. for Carbine Shooting, was presented to Sergeant Forbes; Aliordeen ; the second, of 3. to Lieut. Maitlaml Prizes f 2 each were presented to Lieut. Dalyell and Gunner Fisher. Broughty Ferry; Corporal Gibson, Peterhead, and Sergeant" Mitchell. 2d Kincardine Artillery ; and the seventh, of 1, to Gunner G. Moir, Kincardine. On the winners of the first prize of 15 in the Garrison Gun Competition being announced, Lord 1 alhousic asked Captain Dickson if it was the newly formed company ? and, on receiving a reply in the affirmative, his Lordship said -"1 think it right, volunteers, to call your attention to the winners of this prize. It only shows what a little energy may do. This is a prize given to the artillery for great gun practice, and it has been carried oil' from the veterans of the county by the last raised battery. (Applause.) That shows you what a little energy will do. I have great pleasure, Captain Dickson, in putting the prize into your hands.'' The second prize, of 3, was then presented to the (.'aptain of the Johnshayen Battery ; and the the third, of 2; to the Captain of the 7th Alerdeen Company. Lord LALH0t'stE then said The prizes are now distributed to all who are present, and I have only one remark to make, which is this - that I trust, ere another occasion like this, some arrangement maybe made whereby we can have all the winners before us. There are several beautiful prizes on the table, and I think the volunteers should be all present to receive them. (Applause.) His Lordship then called for three cheers for the (tueen anil the ladies, which were heartily given. Colonel Resny Tailyotr called for three cheers for the Lord- Lieu tenant, which call was enthusiastically responded to. The volunteers were then drawn off, and the company dispersed. The members of the Association dined in the evening -the Earl of Dalhousie occupying the chair. SIMU LT A N E ) US M AT C H . On Wednesday evening, a squad was made up of competitors in the Simultaneous Match fur England, Scotland, Ireland, Canada, and India. The Match consists of f..ur competitions, but a competitor's lest two scores determine his position. There are also several sweepstakes depending upon the match. Three of the competitions have already taken place, and the month of June was a .pointed for the fourth-The competition is at N, IHKl, and 10(H) yards ten shots at each distance, and wc subjoin the scores made : SO0. 000. 1000. TI. 37 36 33 105 23 34 35 12 20 30 2.5 81 MS 25 24 87 35 22 31 SS the squad, 4t3 dent occurred while Edward Ross (Whitworth), Sergt. W. Forbes (do.), Major Biothl ly ( Henry), Farl of Aberdeen (Whitworth), J. G. Peteikin (do.), Total score A somewhat curious ii Sergeant Forbes was firing his tirst shot at 900 yards. An unlucky emw happened to cross the line of fire at the time. The bullet passed through its head, and it dropped dead on the ground; but, whether the ball had been detleeted from its course by asaing th rough the unfortunate " hood y or not, it missed the target. ABERDEEN U. On Wednesday evenin. PETERHEAD, a friendly match took Aberdeen and six from Peterhead. The competition was at 400 and 500 yards, five shots at each distance ; and at the close it was found that the Aberdeen men had won by a majority of tive marks. The following are the scores ma le : Peterhead. 400 yds. 500 yds. TI. Sergeant A. M'Kenzie, James Ogilvie. ( 'or; .oral Clarke, D. Kirktou, . J. Mac donald, jun., J. Macdonald, sen., 14 7 21 14 13 27 8 14 22 10 8 IS 15 8 23 13 12 25 136 11 12 23 14 9 23 18 13 31 17 10 27 10 13 23 S 6 14 141 Aberdeen. Sergeant A. M. Mackie, Private John Irvine, Private Hugh Grant, Private Thomas Donaldson, Corporal Humphrey, Corporal Macpherson, COMPETITION OF SCOTTISH GAMES. These rames began on the Links at about twelve o'clock yesterday. The place fixed upon was the same as last year, and was properly fenced. The ground w:is kept by Mr Brownlee, Superintendent of Police, Montrose, who was assisted liva number ot the police force of Arbroath, &c. The utmost order prevailed. The prize list was very extensive, there being no less than twenty prizes offered, and these again were divided into first, second, and third prizes, ranging from 15s to 2s Od. Below wo give the prize list : THKoWlNo TUP. HAMMER. Donald Dinnie, Aboyne (92 feet), 15s. David Duncan, Hillside (S5 ft. 9 in.), 7s 6d. Lubm Dir.. i.e. Aboyne (81 feet), 5s. PUTTING THE STONE. Donald Dinnie, Aboyne (38 ft. 4 in.), 15s. David Duncan, Hillside (35 ft. 2 in.), 7s 6d. And. Milne. Montrose (33 ft. 9 in.), 5s. KUNNINO LONG LEAP. 1. A. Milne, Forfar, 10s. 2. D. Milne, Forfar, 5s. 3. G. Hunter, Montrose, 2s 6d. BROAD SWORD EXERCISE. 2. W. Walker, Aberdeen, 7s 6d. 3. Geo. Hunter, Montrose, 5s. RUNNIN'l lll lH LEAP. 1. A. Milne, .Montrose, 10s. 2. Donald Dinnie. Alovne, 5s. 3. David Milne, Forfar, 2s Od. linen and kick. 1. A. Milne, Montrose, 10. 2. D. Milne, Montrose (equal), 5s. 3. David Birsc, Montrose, 2s 6d. DANCING HIGHL-Tf REELS. 1. James Robertson, Kernaird, 15s. 2. Win. Robertson, Perth, 7s 6(1. 3. Thos. S. Douglas, Aberdeen, 5s. PLAYING HIGHLAND HEELS. 1. John Scott, F'etteresso, 15s. 2. Thos. Pearson, Sunnyside, 7s 6d. 3. Andrew Eraser, Kinnaird, 5s. RC.NNTNO HOP, STOP, AND LEAP. 1. A. Milne, Montrose, P)s. 2. D. Milne, Forfar, 5s. 3. G. Hunter, Montrose, 2s 6d, VAULTING WITH THE PoOL. 1. D. Milne, Forfar, 12s 6d. 2. A. Milne. Montrose, 7s 6d. ( V . V aUou, Aberdeen. , Aberdeen. r, , Montrose, f SWORD DANCE. 1. D. M" Donald, Fordoun, 12s 6d. 2. J. S. Douglas, Aberdeen, 7s Od. 3. W. Robertson, Perth, 03. SACK RACK- 1. Robert Burnes, 10s. 2. John Arkisson, 5s. 3. Wm. Dalgetty, 2s 6d. HIGHLAND FLING. 1. Geo. Mason. Aberdeen, 15. 2. James Robertson, Kinnaird, 7s 6d. 3. J. S. Douglas, Aberdeen, 5s. FOOT HACK 200 YARDS. 1. P. Milne, Forfar, 10s. 2. A. Milne, Montrose, 7s td. 3. D. Duncan, Sunnyside, 5s. BLINDFOLD H ACE. 1. John Young, Montrose, 7s 6d. 2. John Milne, do., 5s. 3. John Hill, do., 2s 6d. TOSSING THE CABER. 1. Donald Dinnie, Aboyne, 10s. 2. David Duncan, 5s. 3. D. ftliln, Drumtoehty, 2s 6d. l'ONKKV RACE. 1. (Nanny) John Ross, Dun, 15s. Walked the course. HoVS RACE -200 YARDS. 1. W. Lindsay, 5s. 2. John Milne, Forfar, 4s. 3. W. Ross. 3s, LUNG KooT H i E -HALF A MILE. 1. Duncan M'Donald, 15s. 2. Alex. Caithness, Montrose, l')s. POTATO RACE. 1. Robert Whyte, 7s 6d. 2. George Sturroek, 5s. 3. John Borthwick, 2s 0d. 4. George Young, 2s. The following additional competitions were given as under : - 2l0 YARDS FooT RAGE. 1. John Stewart, Forfar, 10s. 2. William Monro, Cove, 7s Od. 3 Alex. Ross, Montrose, 5s. RUNNING LONG LEAP. 1. George Hunter, Montrose, 73 6d. 2. John Stewart, Forfar, 5s. 3. James Allan, Arbroath, 2s od. RUNNING Hli.H LEAP. 1. D. Birsc, Montrose, 7s od. 2. D. Duncan, Sunnyside, 5s. 3. Alex. Ross. Montrose, 2s Od. PON FY HACK. Four started, which were owned aa follows : 1. Mr Brvmer, Brechin, t'2 2s. 2. Mr Balfour, Montrose, 1 Is. Had there been six entries, three prizes would have been .given. A SPANISH BULLFIGHT. The following description of a bullfight is communicated by Mr T. Sopwith. M.A., F.R.S., to the Hfj h.inn Courant. The writer states : " Before taking my seat I walked round to see the stables, and there .-saw the men who were to perform, as also their horses. Judge of my astonishment on seeing a small chapel bghted up with candles, where the whole of the men are confessed before they bgin their perilous avocation, and where, in the event of their being mortally wounded in the course of the combat, the Bacrame&t of extreme unction is administered. There was no laughing nor joking either among the performers or the lookers-on ; the former had quite the air of men who knew the risk they were alxiut to run. The arena is alout 100 paces in diameter, and surrounded by a double barrier. " After a flourish of trumpets the arena was cleared of spectators, several soldiers n horseback assisting to expedite their departure. A procession then entered, consisting of two imuifers of the ceremonies, tive picadors on horseback, 14 handerilleros, including three matadors, all dressed in red or blue silk, richly embroidered with gold, silver, or black silk, and two teams of mules, three in each, with nine or ten assistants, to draw the dead carcasses from the ring. ' The whole procession crossed the arena and advanced to the trout of the Royal box, which on this occasion was empty, but from an adjoining box a bunch of keys was thrown tdi berate the bulls from their dungeons. The procession retired with the keys, and none but the banderilleros remained. A door in the barrier was theu thrown open and No. 1 bull trotted into the ring. He stepped when he had gone about tweiitv paces, and gazed right and left in evident bewilderment. Then, seeing the banderilleros, he quickly trotted aftr them. They evaded him. and engaged his attention by waving li ving cloaks of different bright eobwirs about his head. The bull soon Stopped and stood steadily locking at the banderilleros, who advanced close to him and cleverly evaded the several charges made by the animal. The latter was very Undecided, and seemed afraid of has opponents. The spectators now began to express disapproval of his cowardice, and there was a general hissing when the bull, on Wing boldly confronted by Cuehaces, turned away. The trumpets now sounded as the signal for another act of the performance to commence. Darts were given to the banderilleros, who. stuck them into the shoulders of the bull ; they were stuck in nit thrown. The art of so doing requires a very active movement, which, by its dexterity isgraeeful. It is done when the bull is charging, and the darts about thirty inches long are thrust in two at a time. This must be done deliberately, and the place of insertion ia a fleshy part of the fore shoulders. No wound during the whole of the performance is indicted on any other part than the shoulLers. The bull being a coward, the spectators called ''fucjo ;r and the darts, instead of beuag plain, were provided with squibs aud crackers, which ignited as they entered the tlesh, and were seen Mazing about the bewildered and now infuriated animal. Six darts, were thrust hi, and although the wretched animal wa.s wild with pain and rage he was not thought sufficiently brave ; a flourish of trumpets announced the List, act, the picadors not having been put in requisition at all. " Guchares, the principal performer, now appeared upon the scene with a red cloth acid a long thin sword. The bull was completely frightened of him, and it was only after being followed for some time that he showed any disposition to turn upon and attack his persecutor. Cuchares allowed him to charge two or three times, just steping a foot or two aside, and then gazing steadily at him, plunged his sworl nearly to the hilt in the shoulders of the bull, which immediately fell on his knees, and received a final wound with a poinard. " A second bull now galloped hi to the ring, and at once began to chase the banderilleros, who ran before him with great coolness, and at times waved their long mantles about his horns. As the bull ran faster than the men, the latter must either turn aside or try to bafiie him with their bright red mantles, and this they generally succeeded in doing. This requires very great adroitness as well as activity and presence of mind, for if the mantle was not properly thrown, the performer would probably step uon it and be thrown down, at the risk of almost certain death. Picadors were now' introduced, andthebuUin pursuing the banderilleros suddenlycaughtsightof a horse close to him: he seemed thunderstruck, pawed theground, lowered his head, and rushed upon the horse. The picador thrust at him with his lance, but the bull broke right through this defence, and, with a tremendous gore, killed the horse. He then rushed at another horse, was twice repulsed by the lance, but succeeded a third time and unhorsed the picador. A third horse suffered a similar fate, and hit rider received a heavy fall, which disabled him for the rest of the day- indeed, the only chance for his life was in the immediate rescue by the banderilleros. This bub was very clumsily treated by the secoud matador, who faded no less than five times in the attempt to inflict a death blow, and for which he was hissed by the people. ''The third bull made what was called the ' best' fighj of the day. Duriii'' his career he charged three horses in the middle of the arena one after the other, lifting them completely off the ground. The picador was thrown from one of them six paces forward and lay extended on the ground. The bull was going up to him, mail with rage, wheu Cuchares actually seized him by the horns and thus saved the Life of the fallen man. This act of daring was greeted with tremendous applause. I may say the merit of a bull is judged by the Spanish ancionculo (connoisseur j by the number of tunes he enters to the lancing charges of the picador, without turning back or appearing to dread the prick of the lance. If a bull does not enter at all, the people have a right to demand fiiego, as was the case with the tirst bull this day, and the President in such a case gives consent for darts to be used with crackers on them. " Of the remaining three bulls a similar recital might be made. The banderilleros, who legan with caution and with the air of men who knew what they were combating with, grew bolder and bolder, and it would le useless to describe the several varieties of skill and courage they displayed." The Italian Government has ordered steps to be taken at all the Italian ports to prevent the spread of cholera by ships arriving from Egypt. A pedagogue was about to rlog a pupd for having said he was a fool, when the boy cried out, "Oh, don't ! don't! I won'lfcall you so any more -I'll never my vhat 1 think ain, "in all the days of my life." Chaco Marriage Ceremonies. The marriage ceremony amongst these tribes is a very simple one. The smitten swain proitoses to the father of the soft she could hardly lie styled fair one. No voice or will of hers has anything to do in the matter. If the proposal be accepted, the suitor is invited to pass the evening at his bride -expectant's house. Next morning he is off to the woods to kill or catch alive a deer, ostrich, or wild pig, which he brings to his lady-love as a proof that he is expert in the chase, and an assurance that he can provide for her material wants. hi his return with the spoil, the girl's mother takes the " recado" and bridle from his horse, placing them on tbe spot where he is to take up his future abiding place, tit voila tout! On the first night it is incumbent for the newjy-wedded couple to sleep beneath a horse-skin, with their heads turned to the west ; for the cerenionv is not considered perfect till the sun shines on their feet the following morning. But if after-differences, distastes, or regrets should arise on the husland's part -the jo3si-bility of such a thing is not supposed to exist with the woman and the faithless fellow goes wooing elsewhere, there is a much more simple and inexpensive mode of divorce than that presided over by Sir James Wilde. In presence of a conclave of cacique the question is decided in a hand-to-hand fight by the two women, their families being likewise lookers-on. The guilty man stands with folded arms a mute spectator of the tournament, and by the established laws he is obliged to take the victor fur his spouse, Bwno Aarts and Argentine Gleaningi, By Thomas J. Hutchiiuion, F.E.G.S. 4-0, LORD ELCHO SHOWS SPIRIT The following correspondence has been forwarded to the Times for publication : - ''Protestant Electoral Cnion of Scotland, 17 George IV. Bridge, Edinburgh, June 17. " Dear Sir, We are instructed by the Protestant Electoral Union of Scotland to request the favour uf your reply to the following questions, as a candidate tor the representation 111 raruanieiit oi Haddingtonshire, viz. : " 1. Will you support a motion for the withdrawal of the Maynooth grant, and of all other Parliamentary grants for the support of Romanism? " 2. Will you support or oppose any proposal in Parliament for the endowment of the Roman Catholic priesthood in Ireland out of the Consolidated Fund or otherwise? " We are, dear Sir, yours truly, ,:J.H. Skinner, President. " W. G. GamsSIaH, Hon. Sec. " The Right Hon. Lord Elcho, M. P." ''St James's-plaee, June 10. " Gentlemen, I have to acknowledge the receipt of a lithographed circular letter, dated ' Protectant Electoral Luiou of Scetland,' commencing with 'Dear Sir,' and signed 'J. H. Skinner, presidents W. G. Caasels, Hon. Secretary. 1 " By this circular I am requested to reply to the following ouestions : - " I. Will you support a motion for the withdrawal of the Maynooth grant, and of all other grants for the support of Romanimi? "2. Will you support or oppose any proposal in Parliament for the endowment of the Roman ( Catholic priesthood in Ireland out of the Consolidated F'und or otherwise 1 " In reply I haye to state that, personally, I have not the honour of your acquaintance, that publicly I have no knowledge of the existence of the ' Protestant Electoral Cnion of Scotland,' and that, politically, I do not recognize the jurisdiction of any such self -c mat it u ted 1 . h ly. "I deny the right of this or of any other aelf-conatituted political association to attempt to usurp the function of the constituencies, and thus to interfere between a representative and his constituents, or between candidates and electors. It is a direct interference with the freedom of election, and an unconstitutional attempt to lower the r.-oro-ntati ve of a constituency to the level of a delegate of a sectarian political association. " I have now for eighteen years had the honour of representing the county of Haddington in Parliament. 1 have invariably declined as regards my constituents to limit my free! un and discretion in the exercise of my Parliamentary duties by any idedge. To that couse I mtend to adhere. Hitherto have enjoyed the confidence of my constituents. That confidence f hope to retain, and I do not belies e it will be forfeited or damimshed by my denying on their part, as well as i my own, your right to interfere between them and me. " 1 remain, your obedient servant, Elcho." THE PROTESTANT ELECTORAL UNION AND LORD ELCHO. (From the 'Times.') Lord Elcho deserves the thank of all candidates who have the least self-respect tor his spirited replv to the Protectant Electoral T. niim of ScotlaniL Who or what this body may be we do not profess to know, and have no desire to be informed. It is enough for our purpose that it presumes to dictate pledges from a central office in Edudwrgli .to those who are standing for other Scotch coastitueneies. Such dictation we hold to be uncunstitut mna! and intolerable. It is mt less an insult to the independence of counties and lxr(ughs than it is to the independence of candidate. if the electors of Haduintunshire choose to ak Lord Elcho what his views are on the subt ,,f Roman Catholic endowments, they have- a perfect right to do so, and lie must take the eoiise-nuences of an unsatisfactory- answer. 'Hm is a lyaestion between him and Ins constituents, and if any section of the latter thmk proper t act under the inspiration of an Edinburgh Committee, no one can prevent them. Some .lays ago a numb.-r inter-rogatories, such as might have been drawn up by Mr AVhalley, appeared in our own column. They purported to emanate from Whitehall I kirdtmg, and were intended to be applied as a test at the inn-nd-ing election, but th.-y differed m one mjpOrtant respect from those received and published by Lord Elcho. Instead of lx;ing; address d Lire tly t- the candidate bv the Whitehall defenders of the-"Protestant faith, they were suggested for the use ot" electors "interested in the Protestant institutions of this country." In Scotlaail, it appears, they manage these things less circuit- usly. A Mr Skinner and a Mr Cassels indite a letter to Lord Elcho, beginning "Dear Sir," and ending "yours truly," requesting the favour of his reply "as a candidate Eur the representation in Parliament of Haddingfrsnahire " to certain questions framed by the Protestant Electoral Cnion of Scotland. A more impertinent intrusion on private opinion has not lately come under our notice, and it would have ,,Vt Elcho'a duty to protect himself against it, however much he might lnwanlly sympathise with she Protest zeal of Messrs Skinner and Tassels. Nothing can be more conclusive than his repudiation of their meddlesome intervention. " I have tu state,'' he-says, "that, personally, I have not the honour of your acquaintance ; that, publiclv, I have to knowledge of the existence of the Protestant Electoral Union of Scotland; and that, politicallv, I do not recognise the jurisdiction of any such self constituted body." We awaits with some curiosity, the rejoinder of Mr C assels to this part of Lord Eh-ho s letter. It is now time, however, to see what is the exact form of subscription imposed upon compliant Scotch members. It consists of two articles, one-relating to the Maynooth grant, the other to a e.iitemplated proposal for the endowment of the Roman ( 'atholie priesthood in Ireland. As to the former the candidate is asked whether he will support amotion for the withdrawal of this.: and of all other Pariiamentarv latter, he is asked whether he will oppose any such endowment " out of the Consolidated Fund or otherwise." Compared with the queries issued by the London Committee, these, it must be confessed, are at least, concise. " Will you join us- in resisting the agressions of the Church of Rome ? Will you maintain the securities provided by the- Act of IS'ii)? Will you support a bill to provide for the authorised inspection of Romish convents in thts country and the setting at liU-rty of any persons confined therein who may desire to leave them ? Will you ornme the endowment of Romish Colleges, the grants of Royal i charters to. Romish Universities, and at every favourable pportunity will y.,u. vote to withdraw I the endowment from the College of Maynooth ? Will you vote against every further- concession of pav ' power, or privilege to Romish priests?" Such is the I larger uatecnism, or wnicn tl:e Scotch formula pears to be an abstract. The latter, howe ap- contains what Scotch diviaes are fond of calling " the root of the matter," and no Protestant of doubtful orthodoxy could easily escape through its meshes. We cannot help feelina that there is something a little shabby, as well as sectarian, in the aniitu.-i betrayed in this document. Not only have the Scotch Presbyterians maintained their own Church in Scotlanil, as they had a fair right to do, but in Ireland, where they are mere Dissenters, they have managed to obtain subsidies and exceptional privileges from, the State. And yet they grudge the Roman Catholics, leimc the trreat majority of the Irish people, any assistance from the same source ; as if the Rsriwn, Donum could be defended on any principle or TJicy or justice after the Maynooth grant should he withdrawn. It is often possible- for a compact clique, by a gross abuse of their power, to disturb the just balance of an election. The Sablatarian test has thus been employed lefore this in Scotland, and the Permissive Bill in England. Candidates are told that some forty or fifty voters will go for no on1 who does not repeat their shibboleth, and will go for any i ne who does. Where forty or fifty votes would just turn the scale, it requires more than ordinary fortitude ami resolution to refuse the pledge especially if there is not the remotest chance of the measure becoming law. It is all the more necessary, therefore, for those whose position is strong enough, and for the independent part of the electoral body, to resent and reiel this tyranny as it deserves. Were it to prevail generally, it would tend, as Lord Elcho says, " to lower the representative of a constituency to the level of a delegate of a sectarian political association." No one of any eminence or spirit would suomit to this degradation, ami the worst faults of Trades Unions would infect our Parliamentary system. Let us suppose, however, for a moment that the Protestant Committees in London and Edinburgh were able bv dexterous tactics to carry their point in a large majority of counties and burghs. In such a state of things, were it not too absurd to imagine, Lord Palmerstou mi-ht as well resign the Premiership in favour of Mr N'ewdegate, for neither he n.r any other statesman would accept the Whitehall (hardens platform. Still less would it be accepted by public opinion ; pledges would soon be forgotten, and the short-lived triumph of the Protestant party would beau effectual death-blow to its influence. Never buy goods of those who don't advertise They sell so little that they have to sell dear. Yankee Paper. The ladies of Moscow have forwarded to the Pruicess Dagmar a copy of the Gospels bound m violet velvet. A joke which has great success on the Paris Boulevards is, that the next strike will xi a strike of the army, all the soldiers in France refusing to do duty unless they g$ Ui;ner pay. Birth wan Iiea. -In 1S.30 the promoters of the great Lxhibition were m a dilemma. They had adopted a plan of the building, but when hey came to consider it, they discovered, to their dismay that it could not be erected in time. The matter'oame into discussion in the House, and Paxton was in the gallery the while ; and, as he listened, it struck him that a budding on the plan of his pa&t conservatory at thatsworth-a vast erectkvn wi iron and glas in short would answer the purpose better than smother,- and could lie built in linie. He lent the gal-lerj', got a pen and ink, and a sheet of blotting-paper the only sheet of paper large enough that was avail-alle and then aud re. sketched wughly the plan whidi he had fomtd. m his mincV Bv some means He then got acoesa to the t'omivdsi.anera, who had the sagacity to see :tt once 1a.t here, possibly, was a way out Qf mr W&cv&$p-lllwfratt!ii Thw RAILWAY TIME TABLES FOR JUNE. DL"NIEK AND N KWTV LB V P 'Pruns. a.m. a.m. p.m. p.m.' p.m. DUNDEE leave s. 15 U 50 3 15 4 15 7 5 Liff. 5 25 12 ip 4 25 7 16 Camperdown .. 112 8 4 29 7 20 Loehetj 3 32 it 10 I 4 33 7 24 .. Baliloviii 3 3ui2 17 4 7 4 10 7 31 Balilrasron. 3 43 12 22 . . 4 45 7 36 Pronly 3 MOTS 29 t 12 . , 7 43 .. " Auchcerhouse , a 64112 34 4 is 1 7 4 VEWTYLK ....arriTe 9 1012 501 4 35 '84 Ardler 9 30, 1 10 4 4A a roup:.r Angus 0 4fl l 20 5 0 Blairgowrie 10 0 1 35 5 15 Sr Meiglf 9 40' I 27 5 1 5 Aiytk - 10 is 1 50 5 22 3 Fassie 10 22 .. 5 H C'laraU 10 27 1 .. 5 22 2, Kirri-muir 11 30 2 10 3 45 FORFAR 10 40 1 50 37 DUNDEE A.VD NEW fVLE Down Thai Hi cm. p.m. p.m 3 e 12 lOt 7 33 11 10) .. -S 15 12 22 . . 9 25! 1 J 271 .. FORFAR leave Kirriemuir i .lamia Kits tie Abth M igle Blairgowrie t 'on par ngua Ar ler arrive 35 12 151 50 12 34i 4lll2 15) 5 40 - 3 : ' 5 40 5 j 12 35 12 45' 1 01 1 nl 1 19i 5 57 8 5 8 20 - s KWTYLE ... leaves 0 9 13 10 45 111 0 11 5 11 15 11 2c 11 30 11 33 11 37 11 43 An hterhouae . . I 'r uily Biliraon Uaidovan Loohee ramper.l.iwn . . . Litf . 8 14 9 32 35 '8 18 .. 8-21 . . 8 28 .. 8 40 1 lf 4 r 8 4 8 51 8 57 7 0 7 4 7 15 1 30 4 55J 8 34 37 .. 8 41 r 54 arrive 3 .32 10 f 1 39 5 33 1 421 5 37 DUNDEE 1 52 5 48 lilt) i. 45 p.m. train will at.jp K intr-r?e.iiite -on-tiou for DasseriKer toXnwtyle, or natiuns ..evon.l on t! e -lik'nul lining violate. I. The 0.13 a.m. train fr..m Newtyle will topat Droulv when t'-.er-are passengers t tak- tia DUNDEE AND LOCH EE K mi, .. mEE. At S..15. "l.ii. Jt ii.., iii.iu. i j-, j 7 5. anl 8.30 p.m. From I.OCHKE. At 3.31, 9. 43 .anil tl. 30a.m. ; an.) 1.3. 5 :, 8.57. ami : 0 p.m. Fri.lavsthe 1 .4f a.m. train fromDun.lee wil) not r ti DUNnEK AND BROUGHTY FERRY. Trains m irked a stop at Wt Ferry From DUNdkk i.o. t o. s o, s ,,, 9.35 9 ir, ami 1! 30a a.m.; 12.50, l.Ou. 2.10a, 3.15a. t3..J0 4.3a 5 '.5a 8.30a ..t&, 7 40a. 3.30a, 9.45a. and 110 15a p iu ' Fkom rMlOl'GHTY FERRY -7.25a, i;Wa 9. ( !. '' i'"1 and 10.30a a.m. : 12. "-a. 1 50, 12 57a, I, ', , ' ' r.lw 5 4-2 6.20a, 7.3a, 7.33, 9.10a, 9.50a, anil t lo.?)o p.rri'' On Tuetrtiys a Train leaves Duu.lee for Broughty Ferry at On lucsdara train leave Broughty Ferry for Dunrlee at 1" A a m. ' lb- p.m. down train will run on to Monitieth on ww nes.Uyi and S.turdays, returning frum Monitieth st 4. " n m n iim.liyj traina leave Dundee for Bron-hty Fevr-at 3.0 an I 4. .0 p m ' On atunUys trains leave Broughty Ferry for Dunifce at 2. 15, :j.5, and a, SO p.m. t The 10. 15 p.m. train fiom Dund-e to Broughty Frry .loss not leave till 10.30 p.m. on Saturdays return. n from Brouehtv 1 erry at 1H.45 p m. DC.VDKE 5 AKBKOVTH -OEinN nU Kt;H. Sic. ' un.lav. a.m. a.m. D.m D. m. n.m ARBRO VTH, le.ve.. DUNDKK, leive.. t Andrews, arrive t'iiar, liave I iimf-rinline, arrive.. Kirkctl.lv, leave EDINBURGH, arnv. 0 2 12 17 2 44 5 H4 a.m. p.m. 0 9 45 1 0 :i 30 1 JO i (0 7 25 11 0 .. 4 44 7 47 4 1 0 531 2 0 4 341 7 441 1 K VI SSOli 20' 3 25 0 45 'i I.sl 10 11a47 2 43, 5 40 s ul 2 (5 -1 J 30 1 op. 3 i'J 7 o o 4sno ss - iO KDi V BURGH TO DU.NTJKKjt A RBKOATH. I Sun. lavs an, a.m. p.m. p.m. p.m.'xm urn BDIXBURCH, leavd 8 2SS 45 1 10 4 20 6 45 o to 1 Dunft-riuiine . . .. O.ipar ad -ew -, DUNDKK. irrive "-'r"' i" ( ,v10 2 21 5 Xi 1 .17 SO 0H0 25 1 40 4 30 7 30. 6 4-. U 57 3 4 4 3ij S 50 9 17 s. 1 1 ; .v i 50 0:0 . . I 9 4 2 1 2 4 5 7 45 10 2 10 15 AKBRO v i"H, arrivedo iGj I u5 5 20 j 25 W 35 ABERDEEN, AKBRuATH, D L'ND EE ro PKKTH GLA.SOQW, LONDON. 4c. a.m. a.m. a.m. p.m. 6 01 .. I 9 1512p23 Aberdeen, Montr uie Breehin . . Giambi , . leave p. in p m 4 15 S 3 5 22 7 i 5 10 7 15 5 22 .. 7 40 . . 1 0 5.5 I 35 7 4& .. 10 40 1 43 7 :. Kirriemuir, rorfar 1 53 5 41 Class 1 2 3; a.m. Pl.a.1 a.m. p.m. Arbr.iath, . . leave 7 50 0 2 11 17 12 17 p m. p m. p m p. :n 2 44 5 105 33 - 25 East Hjvsn 3 0 0 12 n 27 12 27 2 54 3 5 0 IS-n 33 12 34 3 1 i S S 21 U M 12 37 3 4 9)3 9 -2tni 44 12 46 3 11 3 30 9 40 12 0 12 57 3 22 d 45 9 55"d2 15 1 12 3 37 5 20 . . j 4J 5 25 ) 4a5 13 i23 . . ,52 5 35 7 0 9 2 5 42 7 8 9 10 5 57 7 23 9 38 i arnoustie Barry Monitieth Bronghts Ferry. . Dundee, . .arrive Class 1 2 3 1 2 3, a.m, a m Dundee, lev, 3 0 9 30 Invergowre' 3 9 9 39 I S 3j 1 2 12 3 12 3 p.m I.. Ml Mail 12 45 3 3p 4 10 f5 15 12 54' 4 19 6 24 LenKfiTirn. 3 15 3 21 3 27 9 45 9 51' 9 57 10.. 4 25 I 6 3 19 4 31 1 12 3 25 4 37 1 21 . 4 40 1 27 4 52 H 30 5 3H 6 42 51 Incbtnre . . 1 Errol (.lenoarse . Kin fauns Perth,arriv S 3 10 6 3 42 1 ) 1 3 57 10 2 1 42 3 4d 7 7 lo .. Perth, leav 9 15 Via 15 Brtt.of Alln 10 21 11 33 Mirlin , . to 32 11 5 I 1 50 4 15 ! 50 5 30 7 3" 7 K) 3 43 3 32 9 o Glasgow .. u 40 Edinbrs. ar 12 0 Maneh-tr. Liverpool . l.endn. Kits L111U1, KCrs' .. 7 3310 5 .. 7 510 25 , .-13 5 10 ... 4 25 I .. 4 15 1 9 30 .. I2aI0 9 40 .. ii tO ' .. 1 5 5o 3 30a 1 .. I 7 10 .. .. io 5 7 30 .. ( 9 45 .. , .. 5 S .. ..I .. S l(i .. .. ; .. 1 9 40 ... 1 9 40 " III I A train .e.ives .Juj.dee .tally at 7.0 a.m. for Perth, Mir-ling, Edinburgh, London, and other chief towns in En 'and On fsatu days, extra Teams will leave Perh tiit Dundee at 3. 10 and 3.30 p.m. And Dundee for Perth at 3.30 and i In connection with tbe 3.3 p.m. train from Dundee an IKS " Pccthat 4 ' reachiug L"n,,,jn 3t Vi7 On Tuesdaya a Special Train will leave Montrose at 9 15 Brechin at &.1, and Arbroath at J.51, reach uiz UunrlA t 10.25 a.m. It WiU return from Dundee at tMnl Arbroath at 4.57, Brechin at 5.50. and Homr.VJTm On Saturdays trail .leave Arbroata for Dundee a' - "0 and 3.Ij p.m.. stopping at all stations. w LONDON', GLASGOW, Ji PERT .4 to DL'ND K V AKBKOITH, & ABERDEEN p.m. 3 40 London, Was Liverpl., leav . . 1 Glasgow Stirling ; Brig.of Hani Perth, arrive' ' p.m. 9 15 1 15.t 2 0 p.m. a.m Mia .. I .. 1Q. '9 15,-2 2flp a.m a.m 2 3fi o io o z.3 9 15 1 "tin 1 o ri rv. j 6 40, 6 40 J :i5 1 15 4 15 U 15, 0 7 58: 3 10 10 42 2 30 5 27 7 1 17 .. 3 Is 10 IS A .0 3 59 9 50 11 55 3 30 a 50 j Lll"i0 Class, Perth, leave Kinfauns.. . . Glencar.se ... Errol Inchuire. . . J L agforgan.. I InvergowrifiJ Dundee, arrt 123 12 12 'i 1 -2 1 1 o a.m. .Mail., u.m. n m. nm t 2 p,m. U 40 0 9 '20 10 15 19 S i 10 7 A. 3 10 10 -U 19 -a 1 .v. - W 1SH .. 'l0 32 l- as 4 t ii -9l 9 4i lfl 41 '10 4ft , mI , ... I 10 41 ! U 4 t 3 34 9 50 10 47 12 4 4 45 7 8 40) 10 53113 53 4 51 I j 3 4S .. 11 01 0 4 A s. 12 4a '12 10 9 010 mu 15 1 h i.v .-v.. -Par a.m Dundee, Iuv 7 u Br.ity. Ferry 7 10 Men ti-th ... 7 lfl 12 30 p.m. D.mJ n nd .. 12 50 3 15 l U & Sri? a 1 01 3 27 4 45- i 43 7 b2 9 57 1 5: 3 32 4 si ft 411- ,rt . Barry.. '7 2:5 Uarnoftstie,. 7 33 East Hriv, n 7 ai 3 3d ... II SMj On 11 1 15 3 42 4 Mi, 7 rj , Arbroa'h lev 7 - 3 47 ' 7 11 3 10 10 20 4 10 5 H T . u . ,n -,c rorf tr, arriv 3 49 Kirriemuir .. 0 25 Glamis 9 5 2 33 arriv ..is lsm wiv .. i 8 37 Breebiu j Mon.fr ese.. . , 9 7 5, 3 SO Aberdeen 1035 Inverness.. . . On luesdajs and Friday tuts train will stop at Long for 4 -n Sntur'la'.tn leave Dundee f Arbroath at 3. 1 and 4.20 p.m., stopping at all staxivus. 'ESPAICH AND ARRIVAL tr KOHMi, a v" COLONIAL MAILS AT DUNDEE "ai. Post opfic. June 20 Australia S New Zealand via , , Southampton f !Jly 19 P Jiilv Do. do.. bi 1 i-j-ee. . Brazil, Buenos Ayrwj Munte i Video, and Cap . Vsrde fslandn. 0, KlinlWnn. I June 25, July 9 8 to a M July 8. 50 4 Julv Do. do., by Frwwh Packet I ! . vii Bordeaux,, June 3 2 ! June June Liipee, nope, Ascension. and St Helena,.. . Cape of Good Hop and XaUl, r ' outhnta.ptuiv July 3. 6 11 July 19, 2.30 Y M July nw vi.i .uarseillfs Jun '5 o , Canada and United states hv , ..r": . M ,Jul 1 . 1 . - . . . Kver China. P --jS?LLI? . 1 '-0 p. . Thur vin Southampton, .. t July 3, 2 3 p. m July 3 Do. da,, via Marseilles, . . june . L Falkland Islands , , v S.ZA "'Jwe2v Gibraltar ,uly ; 0.30.MJ,dv 5 India (Calcutta line), Ceylon'")1' 30 ' v Jnn Ac, ma Southampton, f 'July 3, 2. o P.mJuK 3 no.. Dia maramiida r - .. . fndia( Bombay linejia -Southampton , . ,v A. v jane ;s ; .June 2 2.3 j p.v t Do. do.. Bia Marseilles It, '.ralta, Fsypt, and Aden, vi; ) 3 "-30 -v July 8.30 souttmmpton ("June ?5, 2 3n P , T . Do. do.. .a Marseilles,. .. r P' Tw Mauritius, oi- Southampton . Jun" -' t3. i a. June & Ho. do., vt(t Marseilles, iBl 1J- 2.30 p. julv .1 Do. do.. Der Fren.-h Pm.-wJ'' '" 23,8.30 t 5 Mexico "'--.July Newfoundland, via Halifax".".. Ii ly 3 8- !u A-lJune 28 Cnlt-rlSta.,. r.lif,; . i-UU" 3 ? Alter by British Packet, i jane 4 ' n. t. Do do. by United States, ! ' KM Packet, ma Southampton .June 7 2.30 p.s w, June i'. y"r inrnan ) Line jf Packet8uCork.... 1 Jnne 8 w , . WestCoast of Africa, Madeira 1 wZ in V "V," ", ' !Juna 3-3J P July west indies and all places in 1 ' 9 35 9 47 1 9 51 9 57 .. 10 2 1 IS 10 22 1 37 U 7 2 33 11 30 T 'On " - I 11 3S ,2 45 U 25 2 52 12 35 ' 4 10 .. 7 20 I .. ..1 .ue t-acincmciniiing Chili M lllndch3oV.mFraaCe aQ1 Spin "y.T,Wdmi Despatches to Belgium, Otrman tates, tsta. Prussia Holland, Cities of H .tnhurg , Bremen, ihek 6a t ' Rip ri ro At st Ann Bleauhttbld Caiw ,n ih. nn. 1 l A: Exeter Bank, 8con on , i-.k Mitchell, ,.f k daimhter, ' 3 l,Ul W. At Seabank H.iuse, near In- rn.. Conreve, E-j. .,f u &hn Invernuss-shne, of a daughter " mi Kllchit . MARPJA , At Duntnuie, on the 21at inst. y the H v, James Key, eriiniw titter, to I-ab, , fourth V Mr bate Mr James Roljtrt,n, Mylne rj " "il At st Martin,, Prth.hir-, ,, -he 15th hut 1 t Alex. Yule, of CarvdII, Mr John D inlrm (tj Ul" i' "' r ot ute Mr bwr . s Susan, only laughter of Jas. Mint J At Dikehe.ad Farm, Cortoch , t e i 'fF:in" Rev. ;. Milne, Mr A. Greig, griel oV, vi Jan.-, el lest dauhtor ,A theiaS IwTESS ' ' fn.ni,r t-uomaa Loss,-h. At 14 Pilrik' Street, K.Lnbnreh, n the w Kev: W,u fiW D D , the S.Ate Trfft minister of the parish of Redgorton P.-rth-,i,' Beatrice, third .laughter of Charles l k, , Kv p ' merchant, LeJtllL No carila. "'may, fcv( , At.VHwburtrh, on the 20th inst., hv the Rpy r,,hr, v ,. Mr John WiU.n, to Catherine; y.,ung.,t U , " f Ja-i. W dkie, )im , manufacturer At 0 Walmer recent, GOtiMow, on the 21 -it in-t bvts. father of the bride, atitd by the R.v ,j v, Xf. ... . KUmaraock. James L. Cunliffe, E4 to Elsanor Bow da.izhter of the Kev David Brown, of St En Hsl i.uJV' o card-i. At m pmc street, Paisley, on the 20th ln-t , bs V Rev John Thomaon, Free st George Mr Wm Sn V merchant, Dundee, to Mar' N'eiR.n. daughter rji I n Ganhner. " DEATHS. At lr Queen street, Dundee, .,11 the 22d hut Willi,, third son of the late Mr David G.illowav, aged 17 mu ' regretted. FnemU at a di --Unce will piefUM w, soot intimation. At Church Street, Dundee, on th20th int , Janet H , - relict of the l ite Mr Alexamler Hutche.-n, Infant c! teacher, Dntidct. At t lar)u-et, Arln-.ith, m the b'th CUrt. .J ei . smith, relu t ,f the late Mr Ak-x. Bnrnett. brewer int'l-32ii year of her age. At iiiila, India, .-n th 13th inc . in th 2lth v.-.ir .r h., age, from the etf. cts of an aerident. David rge Rnii eldest M,n of Alex. Blair, brewer, MU.a. ; much and ly r-trTMtt.l At 10 Barrack Strert, Prth, on thw :9Hh inst. Thorn, y..nnj!e.tt s- a of tlie late Thomae M l'hr.n, TempArQ Motel, Perth. At Bryannt-ine Square, Iindon, on toe 20th m.t Vi Andrew Rolert Drnmnmnd. the prinripl partner m Cti well known banking Snn of Driimmnd o. M ie niond hal Ijeen lingHring ime monthft. H. -m th , Mr Andrew Berkeley 1 el, b-.t ,..n .. 1 the Hon. Itolrt I mend, ,ixth ana f Uh tourth tfiaeoewt stitbtilau,. .. Lady Mary Perceval, daughter nl the e,-id Eirniont. The late Mr Dniinmond waa born th jfuly -and married. 7;h March, ls-2. IjwIv Klizaetl t redoi second daughter of John Kenrv. Hfth Iikf Of RVitUn, -siuviv.s him. He leaver usue several Mtnn, .-ml hi, , laughters nre married to Mr A. B. Cochrane, M P , md th, Earl of ScariMirough. The Ow says ; We hear that the qucd.n , reviving the Irish r,,uv.,e;vti, in is ahuut l-i brought bcf..re Her Majesty s Government, an "l w'l be mooted m an address to the Crown, m hi h been recommended to the dlergv of retard y -! Lord Primate." PRtf'E.s. OF sHAKKS- June 22, LS65 Hf-y'y sharen. Paid. Desc iption Of stock. Lu.t ales. 9 cent. . fi 25 85 74 StocV. 1 10 i st-.ck. 100 5 Stock. 100 4 St..ck. LdO 5 St,H-k. 4. Stock. 100 44; StCKlk. lo, i Stock. I 100 1 H 10 10 7 10 10 It 50 50 1 H 100 I iro : 10) ; IOd 3 10t 10 J 5 l.j irn 5 UW IijO 5 stock 190 5V Stf--k 1 i- 4 stock. i' ftyp.SL i& 18 5 Stock. 100 5 Stock. . 100 St. k. 10 1 1 5- Stock. DO 5 rttock iOQ 54 Stock. iw I e joo 1 0 I 5 100 100 Stock. 100 5 l'i l0 100 100 5 100 100 luO 100 4 liJi I'TO 100 i0U lf 100 ' 100 1O0 it oefc iuo 5 t"ck. 1 00 5 Stock i00 i; 10 10 j to 10 3 Stock. i00 . lij Stock. 1OO fl Stick. vO 3J Stock. i0 1 20 -KU 1 94 lo 4 10 I 1 -25 as 4j m 2 a 10 10 7'. 10 10 1 4$ 10 10 i Sto,:k. Jo st.K.-k. iri : stock, loo 5 stock. 100 7 Stock, iio 7 10 7 10 , 7 Stock. 10) j 16 4 - 0 2 Stock, ico 5 Stock. 100 5 Stock. 100 0 -tock. i. 5 Stock, loo 3J Stock. 100 5 St-tck. 100 3 124 si O 10 10" 5 10 10 4 Stock. 100 J stock. 00 4 Stock. loo 4 Sto. k. I 1 0 o Stock I ino 5 stock. I 100 ftt st.n-k. 1 0 if st.H.-k. 00 54 Stock 100 3 stock. 100 7 Stock. 100 41 st.ick. ii ii i.) U Stock. 10i) 5i Stock. 101 1-J stoek. 100 U Stock. 100 8 Stock. 100 3j Stock. !00 77 Stock. 100 5 -tock. 100 Stock 100 4V 10 10 5i Stock. 100 10 100 100 11 100 100 J 10 i 6 100 00 9 100 100 10 500 100 0 100 loO tO 20 3i 7) 10 100 3 100 100 71 100 it H 00 M 3 Zi 10 -VI i 9J 1W 13 4p.s. 50 $1 3 4" (i 10 50 l 10 20 l 10 10 1 11 S 3 3 10 2 3 '0 ? 10 20 I 10 SO 12 ia 5 23 4 2 2 r l l !rh 23 f 23i Sprct. & 5 5 ps c. 1 1 iu H 3 25 io as ti ss sa 10 10 10 n 10 10 5 j i 0 to 3 10 10 6 10 A 3prsh 45 4s 4 4,s J 30 operct. 25 13 0 per et l 1 2 25 i Sbick. 1 i 25 stock. 1 1 Railw vi Arhroath Old F r'lr 3. 4. Sfi ij ,) l : 15 ) li 0 v ill 0 0 V 0 o 111 10 0 w :o 1 l 10 U2 o , T 4 2 Ii 13 17 x; S W o m 4 ,) DO i) 0 11 51 15 0 123 0 0 7 "5 14, . 1ij 0 0 I : ot it 0 104; -. -j 122 9 i 1.. . ill 0 0 Ii Ii p IS t ; 53 0 .V. 0 n im i 1 10 o 11 ri ,s.- ;t. ?4 0 ) 4 IO 1) 31 n U VJ 0 3 9 0 7 .7 1 1 10 0 14o III 131 0 ) 71 10 ' II 1 1 7 10 0 0 7 ' 3, 0 ,-. 1 19 11 "5 i r 1 1 .' Ili 11 107 '1 1-4 0 ! S7 0 142 o 10 IT 5 3 15 0 12 9 4 1' 0 .'.4 V 0 irn ) 0 v r i) ) 101 10 0 L Zi 0 11a 0 7 ft K 17 U 10 H ' 7ft, 0 ' si 0 il 3S V S V ' u, ,9 ,, . 113 ' :) 10 i 14 0 1 13- 1' 1 14S 5 0 : '.' " - ' Do i 1V 1'" I 55 p) ' 75 0 O i 0 10 0 '3i 10 0 '.V 1 106 0 0 0 5 0 Hi 0 ) ?4 0 0 43 I 0 4 7 'i 40 ' 0 M 1 ., .1 0 ' s 1 11 l 1) 15 38 0 4 lo 1 : t 1 1 I . n 1) is 2 Caledonian . Do. 44 Prefrr n Do 5 per cent. ' I fo 4 per cent Do. 5 per cent No. .'. Do. tk ner cent. .Nn Do. 44 Der rent Oti 1 Cl)delale;uarante dl i.rieri junction . . BawDri Bnndee nd Newtvl Dander n.l Prth ' Firit-ClaAi P.atVren. .. yuarter Do IO. ewtyle. .. T') Preference 11 ' TMinhuruh v 1 -uvu iw sttrlg-hire Mid liuar ' -tirlinu iV Dnnfline il Batheatejt Uu.iratHee-l 'j. Preference , o. Prefrreac- Nie 2. " F nth i C yde Juncrn i .anuitee-1 rwr -nt Pr'-ference 1 ,-,,r Perpetual I ' uaranter 1 O. trunk of Can...: 1 Do. 1st Prefnce. B. nd Do. do deferrel D". 2d Prefe ,cc BoniM D(. Jo. lirfrtrTV..,! Do. 3d P.-efence. St,,(-kl 'o. ,lo. dferre-ll f... Uh Prefenc StocM Do. do. dftfenv.l1 'rcat h-astern l.reat Nor;h of c ..end D. Do. B. A Deferred B.. ejit Western W.. -i-ornof Canad w , ; . Invenis-i -nd Pr'ti Pth V Dnkld (in 1 .Do. Preference Lev-en t E of Fife - Hi of Ftfe T.ev.-n Do. Preference London n t Bright.. . I olldon . - W r-slnni Loi don A S-Western.. Do ! xien.-uon Share Midland Do. 5 per cent. Pref Do. New , North British.... .... Preference ........... Do New ii i. 1 - 1 Do. Pre Ke iiuble Border L nion Do. Guartnteed Do. New Pref nrrtiue. Peebles Do. Preferenra Do. Jedburgh Pref r.ma, rertn, a Dundee l.rrantn Pr Ference. Preference t per cent Kinross shire w est of Fi e Prr North Ka temBerwick Cecils York Carlisle Sc -ttish 1 eutral Preterem e n .1 - x- . Scot. N E. U p. c Ptc( Scottish Mi l. Or iinar uL-rd.-en MrdirjLirv Do. ti ner et Pv-f J)o. rj prr cent. Pref . l. , i'r cent. Pr-f Dundee ani 1 lrt-r it . Do. 5 Der cent Pri fest Andrew s. South-K.istem jc Dov-rl Ba.xk. Bank of cotlaad British Linen Coy Cdedoaiaii B-uik. .. . . Oty of Glasgow .... . Clvdesifcile Kunlr Commercial Bank.... National litok North of Scotl ,nd... Rojal B.i nk I' nion. Bank I Inm. it XVE. Alliance Iibinnw Caledonian r k L.i- Vi of Glasgow 1. Colonial K 'inhurtfh Life Ki te i So j Uw Lif Life Association Norther iun 2 r 1 15 9 a 4ueeB Insurance Koy! Iniiran !e Scot Notional Insiir . scottisb Provincial Scsr. Cnion Fired: Life Stauind Life I Gas ;Aherd'.--n 1 1 ' y U. Fw r (l is I ;:ht Co Carnostti I ie Lmh: t 0 unde 1 I 1 I e , 1' 53 " Dun. N--wi. is Lduh Co tewiKrt (Vas lo 1 .,1 - L 14 ' KilinLiu vh 1: EduihoriihA Luithd 1- 'dastfi.w 1 ias. Do N. w Kdas. li:y 4 Suhnrhan ..cw Perth New iias. . I MlM'KUI.VVHIL- . Dundee W .ter 'New Do i I Dim .1' St ltd. loo- W 11 8 U 16 0 t 1 5 - J,, o - j Qnn., P. L.,11. 4m. C Dun. Jt Newc c-hip( I Co. (L ir. led) . .. . Dundee tiue-ety C" 'Dan. (orn ExOhuntre Dun. lo ,1 Fxchaaj,. Korth.tr Cl,4e Canal l K01 f Prop, fitiTi afrment 'sc,.t. .u.-draliaiiliiv -1 ,Tay WU,Oe Ebduiw c. Kjt-DDi.l ud st,K;k. 5W J A8TK0X0MICAL AND TID8 TABLE. HOOM. HIU Jlc tises M Sets Itiso:- ' sets. ' Mom Kveo- Fridav Satu d.ijr S nda Monday Tue-day ... Wednesday Thursday .2?' 3 2' 21 3 20 .i I a -J . 2-, a 3' . .7 '. it) .2- 3 i ... ' i 3 4 7 5 10 rt S 7 20 s w 17 1 13 2 10 2 . 3 4 . 0 I s 40 10 W j 1 j f llO 30 5 44 10 57 U li J5 Printed anil Purdwhrxl every raornini,', at tho T' a House Buil'luiLfs. Hi'h Street, By CHARLES ALEXANDER, Fot tho Di.ndek VKwsppwt ksu ffatXlWS ( 0 ' pant Lunito'i ; Si 3 ? - ! 6 r

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