Logansport Pharos-Tribune from Logansport, Indiana on June 17, 1962 · Page 3
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Logansport Pharos-Tribune from Logansport, Indiana · Page 3

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Logansport, Indiana
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Sunday, June 17, 1962
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Page 3
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SUNDAY, JUNE 17,1SG2 THE PHAROS-TK1BUNE and LOGANSPORT PRESS, LOGANSPORT, INDIANA PAGE THREE This Changing World PART 713 Several Limes during the more than thirteen years this column lias been running we have h«l occasion to ask questions of our readers; we usually get an answer, sooner or later. Last week we ais'ked a couple of questions; this lime the answers were immediate, and complete. Both were questions that had been asked the writer, but we didn't know the answers, so we passed them on to our readers. The first one concerned the term "Blackberry Winter". Tuesday eyening we got our first answer. Mrs. Sarah McDowell,. a , neighbor who has h c 1 pe d us through a good many difficult places, called to give us a name for the cool days that occur in the spring after foliage has com'c into leaf. Sucli a cool spell occurred this spring. One of Mrs. McDowell's relatives called on her during the cool days, and remarked; "This must be our Blackberry winter." The. blackberry bushes are always in bloom during the chilly days. The next morning we were talking to another friend about another matter.-During the conversation she quoted "Grandma" Harnetl, Mrs. Mary Barnelt, wife of pioneer David Barnett, whose home ,a large brick house on the west side of the Michigan Road, now Road 25, and now occupied by Veterinarian Doctor Cahalan. Mrs. Barnett had made the same observation: when you went to the country during one of those chilly spellS you would always find the blackberries in bloom. Mrs. McDowell remarked that there was frequently some frost al such limes. (By WiJI Ball, Cass County Historical Society President) So, the information about Black- string of them in the Museum. iery winters has added a little more to our knowledge of pioneer folklore, thanks to the friends who have helped. Our other question was about methods of making rose petal beads, We knew there was such article; in fact, there is a But we knew nothing about making them, although we vaguely remember having seen a formula for their manufacture. But today, Wednesday, June 13, we had a letter from Mrs, Donald Drach, Box 292, R.R. 4, Winamac, which gives full instruc- tions. The letter isn't very long, so we'll, copy it, and if you're interested, you can make your own rose petal beads. "ROSE BEADS" Use petals from the most Era- grant roses, while still fresh, pass them through a meat chopper, using the finest cutler, every day for a period of five days, letting them stand in a covered iron vessel or irdn baking pan a'ter each grinding, A dish may be placed beneath the chopper to catch the juices as they are ground, and the juices are poured back upon the pulp. "Molding can be started when they have been reduced to a dark paste of fine coal black dough, yet retaining the scent of rose petals. Take a small portion of paste and roll 'it in the palm of the hand. Moisten -with water if too dry. Stick a pin through each bead as it is finished and pin. to a board to dry and harden. Beads may be ornamented with indentations on- the sides." Mrs.. Drach goes on to say that the recipe is one she found in her husband's grandmother's cookbook. She also says that she has never tried the formula herself, but feels confident that' it would work satisfactorily if one had the time and material. So, if you want to make some rose petal beads, here's the know- how. Now, go to it. The person who started all (his has evidently run afoul of another snag. The black beads are always strung with gold beads between them; gold and black beads alternating. It seems that now she can't find a source for procurement of the gold beads. Can somebody help some more? PICKET! PARK INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — representatives of the National Association of Colored People picketed a private amusement park Saturday protesting alleged discrimination against Negroes. ^^ STOCKS—BONDS—MUTUAL FUNDS BUY OR SELL ORDERS EXECUTED IN ML MARKETS E.Y. DEN HAM & COMPANY STOCKBROKERS 314 E. Broadway ' Ph<"" SO()B Jacoby On Bridge TRICKS HIDE' IN STRANGE PLACES When [here is only one place (o collect an important trick, that's the place to go after it. Don't give up merely because you don't see much chance to get it. Had West opened a diamond, South's doubtful game contract would have collapsed immediately. But West was not clairvoyant and he opened a heart. East look his ace and looked NORTH <D) 18 V43 * AQ3 *KJ1098 WEST V109S76 410872 EAST AAQ32 VAQJ5 4KJ8 SOUTH A J 10975 VX2 4654 No one vulnerable North East South West 1* Double Hedble Pass 2V 2 A 3 A Pass 4 A Pass Pass Opening lead — V 10. IV Pass Pass around for a way to set the hand. He could count on two sure trump tricks. Would repeated heart leads embarrass declarer? They would if declarer had a four trump suit, but that was out of the question. He surely held five of them. How about sitting back and waiting? Also hopeless! South surely held five spades and the ace and queen of clubs. Once South drew trumps he could drop his losing diamonds on dummy's club suit. By a process of elimination, East had come clown to the diamond suit as the only possible lead. That did not look too promising cither, but East played his nine of diamonds hopefully. West did not hold any face cards, but he did hold the ten of diamonds and eventually East look a diamond trick and the contract was set. Arthritis ~ Rheumatism Vital Facts Explained FItEE DESCRIPTIVE BOOK As a public service to all readers of this paper, a new 36-page highly illustrated book on Arthrl tis and Rheumatism will be mailed ABSOLUTELY FREE to all who write for it. 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