The Times from San Mateo, California on November 30, 1960 · Page 25
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The Times from San Mateo, California · Page 25

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San Mateo, California
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Wednesday, November 30, 1960
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Page 25
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:San.-Mateo Times. Wed., Nov. 30, 1950 .-MOTOR SMALLER THAN A PINHEAD - .Wffliam McLcllaa (top£"af young Pasailena,;Calif.,, engineer, .has -won a . $1000 prize 4 by making an "electric motor the size of a speck of dust.. \ . . ' (AP Wirephoto) Collapse of Cuba Economy JBy HAHOLD K. MILKS '| "I give Castro six months more. SANTIAGO, Cuba (AP) -- Fidel Then ntt even his · Communist"" armed militia and his army ol Castro's Cuba is filled with disillusionment and dread. Yet. the prospect of' an -armed.; overthrow of his'Communist-oriented 'regime today appears more distant than ever. This is- indicated in a quick tour of four of this island's five provinces. , ., '.Many .Cubans, both big and little, predict', a. relatively earlyj end to Castro's Revolutionary · gov- ernrnent.--'But;.m'6# agrc-e the end will come through'.economic collapse, rather ; .than 'by an invasion or an uprising from within! Cubans.'talk'-openly and privately against his rule, from Havana eastward to Santiago, Cuba's second largest city and capital of Oricnto province, where the Castro revolution was born* Most complaints vare 'based on two factors -^economic hardship and wmmuhism. '""' ·' ' ' . Overtime .Cut ·In Santiago,. a-..longshoreman whose union, had, just been told by the government'that workers no longer will receive overtime pay, told this correspondent: ""We have -.been asked to "pull in our belts, · to' work more and cat less. We can do that, but I won't, vorkfor the communists and my companion^ won't either." A businessman, who has -lived in Santiago alt bis'.life and now watches militiamen* giving orders in the establishment' he built, declared: . '. · · '"You could expect people of my class to oppose Castro and his regime even though I and many like me helped it grow. .But here in Santiago it is the little 'people who are feeling the pressure as much or more than we are. Back to Jail For Slayer Who Drinks REDWOOD CITY-A South San Francisco housewife who was let out of, jail last Wednesday so she could .spend Thanksgiving with her ifamily was back, in county jail Atoday. · · . .. _ · ' -- , , i A J * IXViVJJ VbllV~4 ^VJWlKil.lt-1'tt fc, J^/N. ^ »M i J j ·She -B Mrs. Gcrtnide Adatr clectric Mm , ants 45, who was convicted last April r ., n( ,, inninir h ' p ,..,·,,{ · of a',-.charge of--voluntary manslaughter in the" knife slaying of her 3iusband,..Joseph, 44, . ; .By""-last Wednesday, counting 'igood,''tirneV-Wrs. Adair had only;·;two d^.i5,..lcft 'to serve of her one-year jaiil ·sentence. So she for informants can control a hungry people." Castro'' officials in" Santiago 'insist their bearded leader is solving all economic problems .in eastern Cuba rapidly and that. soon this part of the island will-become a worker's paradise. Many kinds of food that have vanished from the markets will again be .".vail- able in plenty, they say. , A Cuban, rancher, who watched hJs own and other ranches taken over by.Castro's agrarian reform program,- disagreed. Herds Shrink "At onc'time, Oriente had some of the-finest herds fa Cuba and we were. able to supply other parts of Cuba' with good meat and still have some left for export," he said. "Today, I believe not more than 30 per cent of the number of cattle we had in Oriente at the - beginning of 1959 is still in the fields." ·· -The-.,rancher bitterly .blamed government .seizure of private ranches and-the inexperience .of the men Castro brought in. to run' them. . -, A sugar, man, who looked back over his shoulder before he spoke, predicted that not even an excellent growing season would save Castro from trouble when the sugar harvest 'begins in De : comber. "There is the problem of when to sell sugar once it is harvested and milled," he said. "But an even bigger problem is getting the harvest in. And I don't think Castro's appointees can do it. "Running a sugar mill is a skilled job which calls for coordinated effort. That is why American sugar mill managers were among the best paid people in Cuba before they were ousted." The sugar man predicted Cas-| tro's regime will close some sugar' mills in-Oriente and cannibalize their, machinery to keep other mills running. One of Castro^ en-i ineers said workers at Moa Bay Vlining Co. are cannibalizing that ??5-million nickel and cobalt plant closed down by its American owners. Dismantled Mou Bay machinery-is -being brought to Santiago and elsesvhere in eastern Cuba to ceep other equipment, especially released- 5 : go home Thanksgiving 1 .,."' . . · Her '. proba'tion ' ' officer, Mrs . ir -'Michaelson,' reported' yes' terday.' to Superior Judge Louis B. Dematteis .that"Krs. Adair got d'ruiik: Sunday, in violation ."of the , terms' of 'her""'probation. 'Judge Btmatteis .-..decided 'that. · Mrs; Adair'should go back to jail and Mrs.' Michaelson suggested- thai she' te detained' until '.'after the holidays to .remove her from tji temptation to celebrate.'-Judgt Dematteis thereupon ordered" hei Back to jail until January; 10. Hi' also · warned; her .'.'that, upon hei jiext release,'if she as much a (akes one .drink she. will.be sent ti the- state prison for women a Corona. functioning, he said. Desperate Men Only a few hundred desperate men are carrying on the counter revolutionary struggle. in the Sierra Maestra, the mountains where Castro' launched his revolution. Yet- when Castro visited Santiago recently to' address the newly armed people's militia, he never left' the'heavily guarded air- oort. Castro's foes in Santiago jeered .he was.afraid to enter thi? pity .that., once...lent' -his., rripvem.enj powerful;' support. ... ,'. ' . " "Castro knows what will happer If he comes here," said a worker "He knows he. no 'longer is we! ·iome, iu' Santiago." . · ,, ' '.-. , Businessmen, fa r m K r s. an 1 , '·orkers, alike appear resigned. t . Baiting 'until such- time as .an a\ ·Innche of hungry people is read o' come crashing down on t 1 - 'astro' regime. "It will.- be- slow 1 ', but it « ·orne,". s;iid a-Santiago worki- ·'We can wait until nore peop .1 ire-hungry." 1 Midget Motor Wins $1,000 Prize for Engineer PASADENA (AP)--Last December a California Institute of Technology theoretical physicist, during a talk onrthe' importance, of miniature electrical gadgets, said: "I want to offer a prize of $1,000 to tHe first guy' who makes · an operating electric motor--rotating electric motor that -can be controlled from the outside--that will be only a l-64th of an inch cube, not cqunting the lead-in wires." . Monday a young engineer collected the $1000 from Dr. Richard Fleynman. William McLellan, who works for a local electronic firm, had to display-'his motor under a 40-power microscope. To the naked eye it appears hardly larger than a speck of dust. fle said it took him 2Vi months to build, on his own time.. It's only six 'one-thousandths of an inch 'in diameter--no larger than the period at the end of-this sentence. Yet it contains four coils of wire with 21 turns per coil,, a "quartz bearing, a .tiny rotor--13 parts in all. It has an output o£ -a millionth, of a horsepower. McLellan acknowledges he has no immediate use for it. But he'll have no trouble.find- ing a use for Dr. Feynman's $1,000 personal check/ ' "That," says McLellan'; "goes toward the e d u c a t i o n of my daughters." i 210 S. San Mateo Dr., San Mateo WHY many people who i · · can afford to pay more than our modest prices W ' · · ' · " · · ' · ' - · · · prefer to shop at Rex, SHOP FOR THESE AND OTHER FINE BRANDS FOR MEN AT REX Van Heusen Shirts , Wings Shirts Dana Imports . Jarmcm Shoes Saxony Hal! Suits and'Sport Coats . Rabin -Robes Campus Sweaters and Sportswear Puritan '.Sweatees Munsingwerfr T-Shirts Jockey Briefs and T's Hickoic Jewelry and Belts v .. .Reis' T-Shirts Fruir-of-Loom Underwear Hanes Briefs and T-Shirts Sir Guy Shirts Buckskein Wool Shirts Timex Watch»s U. S. Keds -Wigwarn Socks Camp and McLnnis Socks ": Thomson "Northcool" Slacks : Levi's Jeans Martex Terry Robes \ Royal Ties - Hallmark Ties , . ; Harris Continental Pants «· . , · · Mukluks Slipper Sox , ; ' · ' . " McKenzie Paja'mas · · · ' Sierra Jackets FOR MEN « 381 boys, too! it Your Money Buys More at Rex Most folks decide in advance just about how much they'll 'spend for each person on their gift list. No on» -wants to jerid a gift that looks, "ax if it camo from a bargain count- er." What they want is never a-"cheap" gift, but the nicest that can bo had for the sum they plan to spend. You'll find help wilh this at Rex. We're a specialty store for men and 'hoys -- not a "chain" -- not a department i .· · store -- but the mora intimate .sort-of store where style, and fashion are more important than price. Here you'll find sportswear and clothing that discriminating men wear with' enjoyment and'satisfaction. Yet -- .prices are lower than you expect -- often surprisingly modest. This is possible because of low rent in ovr dff-main- street location, low overhead due to our self-selection policy,' and because we have no big executive salaries or corpora- tion dividends to pay. We not only "can" give you.better values -- we DO! That's why -Thousands of pleased customers have made us San Mateo's fastest growing store for men. They know from cheerfuLexperience that "The Same Money Buys a Finer Gift at Rex." GIFT WRAPPING IS FREE GIFTS MONQGRAMMiED FREE Your gift'shirts, pajamas, robes, etc.,_can be smartly monogrammed with any 3 initials in choice of. 4 colors , . . at na extra cost! One day service. Up to $1000 FREE PRIZES No purchase required; Last year 70 lucky winners made "Bingo" for sums up. to. $351 This may be your lucky game. Ask fpr.freis Bingo card. Prizes to visitors at our San Mateo store only. REX Men s Wear 210 S. San Mateo Drive, San Mateo Half Block From- 3rd Avenue, Across From Sherman Clay CREDIT CARDS HONORED Banka.-nerrcardj First Western Bank International Charge

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