Chicago Tribune from Chicago, Illinois on June 25, 1986 · 40
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Chicago Tribune from Chicago, Illinois · 40

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Chicago, Illinois
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Wednesday, June 25, 1986
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40
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4 section 4 Uiicago Tribune, Wednesday, June 25, 1986 From pa a o cno Soccer Sting releases assistant Grbic father-confessor. Five years ago, Grbic turned down head coaching jobs in Dallas and Cleveland to stay in Chicago. "I was a little surprised," said Grbic. "I always had an understanding with the players and management. Now they want to take a new direction. I'm surprised they don't include me in that. I feet I did a good job. It's not . the end of the world for me." , Said Roy: "We had a good relationship, but it's just a marriage that's over. This is good for him." "Mike's contract has not been renewed," said Sting president Kenny Stern. "It was a club decision to make a change. There will definitely be an assistant coach. There are people in mind. There's nobody in professional soccer that 1 respect more than Mike." Grbic, SI, a friend of Roy and his teammate with the Chicago Spurs of the defunct National Professional Soccer Association in 1967, earned respect throughout the sport for his knowledge and ability to handle players. Sting players saw him as a buffer and By John Leptich Mike Grbic, a Sting assistant coach since 1980, has been fired. Forward Karl-Heinz Granitza, whose playing future is in doubt, could wind up assisting Willy Roy next season, according to sources. Another possibility for Grbic's vacated post is former Sting goalkeeper Hubert Birkenmeier, who was recently released. Granitza, in Mexico for the World Cup, and Birkenmeier could not be reached for comment. Hockey lerge Savard, 2 more in ' .--uul, es 4 Cubs Continued from page 1 of a crowd of 24,757. Cub pitchers have been pummeled for 33 hits and 26 runs in two games. "What happened Monday night helped a lot of the younger guys who had been struggling at the Plate," said Phillies' manager John elske of the 19-1 pasting. Jhe Cubs took a 1-0 lead in the first. Davey Lopes walked and stole second, then went to third on a single to left by Dunston. Moreland lofted a one-out sacrifice fly to right to score Lopes. The Phillies tied the game in the second. Mike Schmidt singled to extend his hitting streak to 13 games, then Scored on Russell's , two-out double to right. . The Phillies went ahead in the third. With one out, Ron Roen-icke singled to center and Rick Schu walked. Juan Samuel singled up the middle to load the bases. After Schmidt popped up on a 3-0 count, Von Hayes stroked Trout's . first pitch for a two-run single and a 3-1 Phillies' lead. The Cubs pulled to within 3-2 with an unearned run in the fifth. Martinez walked and stole second, his third steal of the season. Trout tried to bunt him to third. Phillies' pitcher Kevin Gross fielded the ball and threw to third, but Martinez retreated to second and ; Trout was safe at first. Lopes hit a fly ball along the right-field line. As Martinez tagged up, Glenn Wilson made a fine running catch and a strong throw toward third. But the ball caromed off Martinez and bounded into the stands, and Martinez was allowed to score. The Phillies went up 4-2 in the . fifth. Schmidt was safe on a fielder's choice and Wilson reached on an error by third baseman Lopes, putting runners at first and second. Russell's single to left scored Schmidt. - The Phillies added two more runs in the sixth. Gross opened with a single. Roenicke's ground-rule double put runners on second and third before Michael called on Eckersley to relieve Trout. ' Eckersley fanned Schu but gave up a sacrifice fly to Samuel that scored Gross. Schmidt dumped a bloop single to right to score Roenicke. The Cubs added a pair of runs in the seventh. Matthews doubled and Martinez walked before Lopes came through with a two-run single to left. Tekulve came in and retired the next two Cubs to preserve the 6-4 lead. The Cubs' Davey Lopes steals second in the first inning. The throw never got to the Phillies' Juan Samuel because it hit Lopes. By Tim Tierney Chicago Tribune MONTREAL The National Hockey League's annual congress ended Tuesday with the election of three former players to the Hall of Fame. They are Serge Savard, a de-fenseman who played 14 seasons with the Montreal Canadiens and is now the team's general manager; Dave Keon, a center for Toronto and Hartford; and Leo Boivin, a defenseman for Toronto, Boston, Detroit, Pittsburgh and Minnesota. The three will be formally inducted Sept. 10. The Hockey Hall of Fame now has 256 members 179 players, 68 builders and 9 referees. Savard played two seasons with the Winnipeg Jets, after retiring from the Canadiens after the 1980-81 season. The Jets missed the playoffs their first two seasons, but Savard is credited with leading them to the playoffs in 1981-82, when they went 33-33-14. Coxing 'Tired' McGuigan assesses damage Serge Savard Leo Boivin The most valuable player in the 1969 Stanley Cup playoffs, Savard also won the 1979 Bill Masterton Trophy for perseverance, sportsmanship and dedication to hockey. "It's an honor to be chosen to the Hall of Fame with those two " said Boivin, a three-time NHL All-Star whose career lasted from 1951 through 1970. Mark Medal in the eighth round to retain his World Boxing Council super welterweight title. . "I'm tired," McGuigan said" Tuesday, sitting poolside at Caesars Palace. "I'm going to take a long rest. I'm not sure whether I'll fight again." McGuigan wore dark glasses to cover his badly bruised face and still had hospital identification bands on his wrist. "I'm 100 percent," McGuigan said. "I had a CAT scan test last night, but they've asked me to come again because they couldn't find my brain." Cruz, who trailed on two of the High schools WW Wmwl K. X k ! --N. S f '3 AP Laserphoto Anderson. "When you're around the plate, you get that. And tonight he was. "But I felt strong. We took different routes, but after each inning, we each had the same results." Davis faced four hitters in the seventh. Each took the first pitch. After Roy Smalley flied to center, Gary Gaetti doubled and Mark Salas singled him home. After Lombardozzi followed with a single, Fregosi called for Gene Nelson to replace Davis. Salas then scored the winning run when Greg Gagne forced Lombardozzi on a bounder to Guillen at short, but the ball wasn't hit sharply enough to ena ble Julio Cruz to turn the double play. "Davis pitched well," said Fregosi. "He did not tire. He just got a couple of pitches up. I'd like to manage a club that only gives up two runs." ,1 f ?to i. - Jl " r1 - irs m TIGER PAW PLUS AU SCASON SLACK WALLS ,.$3050 IH'l O0 IOUV. ON 'II CAM i III X f - MASTER i -y-rVS U.lJnsc'i;0-iie'Tti,.BiVtW I aSSBiSf i7 Wti 3r i t 5E rt FLEETMASTER Cr-- II mi I rmci hlj :,$C'liiij:t doll AmtiLnf 1 l HGNJ r" i i.i ..i I. v" r '""Va "y : Y : NHL Hall i A Dave Keon Keon played 18 seasons in the. NHL 15 with Toronto and four in the World Hockey Association. He played 1,597 regular-season games, scoring 498 goals and -779 assists. Keon, noted as a strong skater and slick playmaker, was the NHL Rookie of the Year in 1961 and twice won the Lady Byng Trophy for gentlemanly play. x three judges' scorecards going into the 15th round, snatched the title by dropping McGuigan twice in the final three minutes to win a unanimous decision. McGuigan said he would have preferred to fight when the sun went down rather than at 6:10 p.m. Las Vegas time, a time set in part to accommodate a live telecast to the United Kingdom. "It would have been much better if we had fought later," he said. "I wasn't sharp. The canvas was so hot that I got blisters on both big toes and on the balls of both my feet by the seventh round." , includes former NFL players Bob Hayes and Willie Lamer. Athletes are tested in 15 areas including stride length, stride rate, leg power, flexibility and percentage of body fat. Based on those tests, Dintiman sets up a 45-minute daily program for athletes to use on their own. "You're born with a certain speed, but you can improve it," said Bryan Wanshek, 16, from St. Francis of Wheaton. "They went over a lot of things, like nutrition and conditioning. I learned a lot" Wanshek, an inside linebacker and running back, considered himself of average speed but was looking for that something extra. Dintiman said athletes often drop three-tenths of a second oil 40 times, but certainly not overnight. "Oh, no,w Dintiman said. "It takes at least five weeks for some of the tissue to change. We're just trying to establish some things.' Dintiman, whose primary NFL client is the Dallas Cowboys, has been running similar camps for 10 years. "It's something new to the Chi-, cago area," said John Urban, football coach at St. Patrick, "It's really an untapped area in the Midwest. People are suddenly realizing just how important speed can be in all sports. "It is not something that's going to be an instant success. What happens is that the kids are given a program, and they've got to follow that program. He Dintiman touches on a lot of little things. What I like is that he doesn't try to sell the kids things. He's here for their sake and not to make money." Seven St. Patrick students attended the camp, including quarterback Eddie Thomas, 17. "I think I'll increase my speed a lot," Thomas said. "They had a lot of equipment, but they also showed us what things we could use around the house to improve our speed." Camp offers athletes leg up on competition From Chicago Tribune wires LAS VEGAS Barry McGuigan awoke from his night's stay in a local hospital with a clear head but a fuzzy vision of his future. Monday night, McGuigan, of Clones, Ireland, lost his World Boxing Association featherweight title to Steve Cruz of Ft. Worth in- a hard-hitting 15-round bout in the sweltering desert heat. Theirs was the first of three fights on the card. In the second bout, 35-year-old middleweight Roberto Duran was derailed in his comeback attempt when he lost a 10-round decision to Robbie Sims. Then, Thomas Hearns stopped . f "J I J 1 f RALLYE280&340 TIGER PAW PLUS WlAlMtR . BtLItl) RAUlAl Sox Continued from page 1 Hulett's fourth home run of the season. It seemed, the way Davis was mowing down the Twins, that that run might stand up. The Twins made Davis' job easier by swinging at first pitches. Davis needed just five pitches to retire the Twins in the first inning and the minimum of three pitches in the sixth. After six shutout innings, Davis had faced 22 batters, and 14 had swung at first pitches. This resulted in 10 outs, two foul balls, one swinging strike and only one hit. Anderson, meanwhile, en route to a 137-pitch complete game, was working harder for his outs. "Every pitcher loves to get first-pitch outs, and I was aware that he Davis was getting them," said City Zip J L Work Phons I s I m mwwm p W 3 $E 3jE "With a full-time banking career and family responsibilities, a formal management education is not an easy goal to achieve. Yet, today, an MBA is practically a necessity. The Graham School of Management at Saint Xavier College is conveniently located and the concepts learned In the program help me in my job. The degree will help me achieve my long range financial goals." Jim Alderden For information, visit or write 3700 West 103rd St., Chicago, IL 60655 or CALL (312) 779-3300, ext. 220 Information Session Thursday, June 26, 7:30 PM I AT By Pete Faust George Dintiman mentioned it with surprising casualness. Earlier in the day, he said, about 20 high school students had run 40-yard dashes much faster than any Carl Lewis has ever run. Of course, Dintiman said with a small smile, they did have some help. It was simply part of the training at the All-Sport Speed Camp that Dintiman, an author of three books on speed improvement and a speed consultant to seven National Football League teams, brought to St. Patrick High School last weekend. The camp is designed for high school, college or professional athletes, but the vast majority of the almost 50 athletes who showed up at St. Patrick were high school football players. Part of the camp involves timing athletes in the 40 while they are being pulled slightly by surgical tubing, which is fastened around their waists and stretched about 100 feet ahead of them. Then, in a rubberband-like fashion, the runners are literally pulled forward by about 8 pounds of pressure. This overspeed technique, which forces runners to take quicker steps and longer strides, is one of the cornerstones of Dintiman's camps and explains some of the incredible times he has witnessed. "I had one kid run the 40 in 3.8 seconds, a couple in 3.9 and others in 4.0;" Dintiman said. "Now that's impossible. The fastest 40 of all time is a 4.5. That was electronically timed. When a guy gets timed in 4.3, that's some error in the coaches' hand timing. "By pulling the kids with surgical tubing, we try to give them a feci for real power, and what it feels like to beat Carl Lewis. After a couple of weeks of overspceding. you can see some improvement? For $45, athletes interested in improving their explosive speed spend two to four days with Dintiman and some of his staff, which I If cSf- 1 I H$AQ9 phi ?iwt ii h i n pjijimi i ii n ji n 0ISCBR AkT S Pici Al CsilHOCKS0R STRUTl 1- ncc tr,)m HIM" r For information, clip this coupon today and send to E.A. McKenna, Graduate Admissions, Saint Xavier College, 3700 West 103rd St., Chicago, IL 60655. hams Address L ) Horns Phons CHICAGO AF11IHG10N HfclGHIS LINCOLNWOOD OAK PARK 348 N CnH SI MJ 8 NolhtM Hy f?TO M Ocr0 A W. NoorH Fid. 8264305 304-6905 6T5-0eOQ 636-073? t CHICAGO CARPENTERSVILLE LOMBAno RIVER FOREST M N CIHOA AvS. 'C",' 0,9 444 W ftoo.tv.H Rtf ???? W Nwth Av 774-6557 436-7207 630-0403 366-06QQ CHICAGO LnGRANGK NILES ttutt lOCATtOMt 30 W Cotumbut 30 N tiOttnQt ltd S33 N Hvltn A 0 ISV TOM 8647733 354-7705 065-646O smew .... r V

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