Naugatuck Daily News from Naugatuck, Connecticut on November 30, 1949 · Page 2
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Naugatuck Daily News from Naugatuck, Connecticut · Page 2

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Naugatuck, Connecticut
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Wednesday, November 30, 1949
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Page 2
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2—NAt;r,ATl-CK VEWS (CONN.). WKDNKSDAV. NOV. .W, 1(t40 DREW PEAKSON ON he WASHINGTON MERRY-GO-ROUND Drew Pearson Says: Congressman Parnell Thomas Collects For Preventing- Soldier's Shipment Overseas; Uncle Sam Helps Promote "Kickback" Congressman's Insurance Finn; Swedes Says Senator Thomas Asked For Scanty Smorgasbord. Washington—Unfortunately it not illegal for a congressman to keep a soldier from seeing combat auty—and then collect a political campaign fund from his family. If this were illegal. Congressman Parnell Thomas would be tried for a.-iother offense in addition to tak- ir.s kickbacks on the salaries which Undo Sam meant for his office staff. In 1044, when Congressman Thomas was up for re-election he received a contribution of S250 from Herman Kimmel of .Long Peach, N. T., which is, of course, outside the congressman's New Jersey district, Again in 1945, when the congressman faced a. primary election, he received another same Kimmel S100 from the New Jersey voters had no way of knowing what was behind these two contributions, but here are the interesting, un-American facts. ilost people have forgotten it, but Thomjis was not only chairman oi the Un-American Activities Committee, but also a member of the House Military Affairs Committee, which passed on Army legislation; therefore, had great weight with the War Departmcr.t. In 1943. Private Edward Allen Kimmel. Serial No. 32801902. son of the above Herman Kimmel, faced fhipment overseas to combat du'y. So Congressman Thomas telephoned the second service command in New York and informed them that young- Kirnmel was an undercover agent for the Un-American Committee, therefore had to be kept close to the New York area. Accordingly, Col. C. E. MiUor, director of personnel for the second service command, transferred Kimmel from Camp Upton, N. Y., iind assigned him as an investigator of the internal security divi- t.on in New York. Army Gets Skeptical A few days later, Colonel Miller asked Kimmel to drop in to see him and seemed surprised that he was only 18 years old, had no experience as an investigator, in fact wa~ merely a student at New York University before entering the .".rnr/. Skeptical. Colonel Miller te'.p- pr.-.ned Congressman Thomas's of- l:< •*., rei cried that Kimmel said he n;iJ never met Thomas, had never v. orked for the Un-American Ac- •-v^Jej Committee. . :• j atch up these crossed wires. "''^ C ; in:r: '- ssm -n immediately sent for'' committee, to see Colonel MilleV However, Colonel Miller remained skeptical. He kept private Kimmel in internal security only 18 days, but did not transfer him ove: ' Instead, he was assigned to Broadway Central Hotel York — ra^ks—and ingr. Fla, Private Kimmel did not go „„- erseas. His buddies did, many never to come back. Waiting a very .scant time after performing this .priceicss favor Congressman Thomas attempted to cash in on it. The Congressmai also operates an insurance agency on the s,de-"Thomas and God? - •— so on September SO 1943 nc wrote, a letter to Private Kirn' mel's r athcri introducing his IS surance partner. "This win introduce my partner. Spencer K. Godfrey wrote to the father of tesies which you may care to extend him." The letter got no results. Godfrey sent it back to Thomas with a notation scribbled across the bottom: "This man refU3ed to talk — said h2 doesn't know you." Later, however, Kimmel overcame his discretion. And when the Congressman who had kept his son out of combat duty came up for re-election, Kimmel contributed a total of $350. Thomas's Insurance Racket The above incident was not the only time the Congressman from New Jerseey used his insurance firm to cash in on favors. For instance, Thomas helped Joseph J. Erunetti, a New Jersey contractor, recover some $40,000 held in escrow by the Federal Housing- Administration. Later, when Brunetti started a huge apartment project in Maywood, N. J., the Congressman re- on wrote him a. letter and was warded with the insurance Brunctti's business. The Congressman also used neat scheme for printing stationery for his insurance firm. It was c-one by the Government Printing- office, sional s paid out of his Congres- tationery allowance Christ- in the mas cards for the firm of Thomas and Godfrey also were -printed and Paid for by Uncle Sam same way. Thus did the gentleman who posed as a great American chairman of the Un-American activities committee squeeze the dolars not only cut of his office staff on salary k lc kbacks but out of the government at every tu«-n the Un-American activities Employment Better Due To Approaching Christmas Season The approaching- Chi-j^mas season brought employment in Connecticut to a higher level in November. The upward trend has contmued for three consecutive months but the gain in October •vas substantially less than the r.f^S nDe i5 r ' SC ' and Preliminary o. re P°rts show a further loss of im- immediately sent pc l us m th « November advance an investigator . De Par(."nent stores and otiher retail outlets have beon adding extra help f or the Christmas e bur. ,„ manufacturing mixed trends V n anc * *'* le e ff e ct of the penW" th° Cal st ° Plpages hav <= dam- ea ~ j ftneu t/ie outlook Th .«.- «;« ussignea to the u' lde diffe rences in steel sunn]*,, ln • Central Hotel in New! -factories in the State Sorn a temporary Army bar-j I"" 6 . eett j n t r close to the shortage d later to Camp Eland- ?L vel a ! K hav e laid off a few work- sleel cxj*ct a hold-u£ on o?derf =?;:~~~; Still ^_j ^-, . "-"y 'n September SCULLY, Florist Flowers for Every Occasion «« BALDWIN ST. Waterbnr? tSO T. SCCit-Y, Pron. PHONE WAT. 5-7280 BUCKMILLER Fcneral Home 22 PARK PLACE Telephone 4334 and October of Neary BuUdlnjr Nangatnck, Conn. S ,teadi'i;7in l c'e C Ju' laVO been r| - 'ffaSaa-s^S « comp^ed^^" 1 ^^^ *»~ earnings, howeve* September and'$51.72 („'' r^*L stl1 ' below FLOWERS For All Occasion. FLOWERS TFJ.EGKAPHEP MELBOURNE'S FLOWER SHOP 1M RUBBER AV iw. sstm oo, December inL I reached TO HTOp— ROOKY'S WAYSIDE KITCHEN Waterbury Koad at riattii Mills Open Dally 12 Noon to 12 Midnight Sundays 3 P. M. to 12 Midnight Save-The-Children Bundle Day Drive Now In Progress As the Save-the^Children Bundle Day drive got off to a wlying start in public schools Monday, with pu- ipUs busily collecting: clothing, shoes and other supplies, Superintendent of Schools, Harold E. Chittenden, made public excerpts from letters which show how much the garments mean to needy children. The letters were received by the Save the Children Federation, which will distribute the clothing-. Parents, teachers and the children themselves, have written from isolated rural areas of the Un.ted States and war-depleted regions of Europe to express heartfelt thanks. A little Kirl in a school in Lofki, Greece, writes: "Some days ago we received your beautiful clothing- and we were so haippy we jumped with joy. We were like the trees that have lost their leaves in tho winter from tho cold. Now your American children dressed UH. Your name will atay deep in our hearts." But even In the United States (here are children wiho deaperate- ly neod clothing, the Federation reports. The principal of a small rural school writes: "We feel that Save the Children Federation clothing has made possible the attendance of 50 or more children in school." A scihool iprincipal in the far northern part of Finland wrote: "You can't, image the pupils' joy when they got all those warm winter clothes—woolen jackets, coats, sweaters and .shoes. The articles of clothing are just such things which are needed here." The letters come in to the national child service organization's New York Office all during the year fno'm Austria, Finland, France, Holland, Greece, Italy and from nine southern and midwes- tern states where children benefit from Bundle Day clothing. COAL MINE LIMIT Few coal mines go down farther than 3,000 feet. 50-Year Jewels To Be Presented By Centennial Lodge Centennial Lodge, I. O. O, P., will observe Ladies Night next Monday evening. The business meeting will be called to order at 7:30 o'clock. At 8 o'clock all Odd Fellows, their | wives, families and sweethearts and all Rebekahs are cordially invited to be present. There will be entertainment consisting of moving pictures, dancing to the music of Ralph Quinn's orchestra and a general social time with refreshments being served. During the evening, four 50 year jewels will be presented to four of Centennial's members who have each held membership for a half a century. LAEGEST STOCK OP FINE WATCHES IN WATEEBURY AMERICAN TOURISTS Europe prepared for 350,000 American tourists and expects some SflO,- 000 in 1952. "KAYSER'S" rayon jersey gown laden with lace . . Petal smooth —Kayser's own precious gown . . . designed for beauty and comfort ... it wears so well . . . washes beautifully, the lace trim top is scandalously flattering . . . azure blue, green iris, blossom ... 32 to 42. 3.00 UNOERIE — STREET FLOOR L/w IvA IOEJK oldest, internationally honored brand name in fine hosiery .. . Kayser's scientific development of proportioned sizes makes it possible for you to wear NYLON stockings of custom order perfection "BE WISER BUY KAYSER!" "Stylon" 45 Gauge— 30 Denier .... i 35 "Fit-All-Top" 45 Gauge 30 Denier .... i 59 "Sheerlon"—51 Gauge 15 Denier ... i (55 "Fashilon"—51 Gauge— ' 15 Denier 1.95 "Lacelon"—nonrun mesh. .1.65 $180.00 $120.00 Prices Include Federal Tax HOSIERY — STREET FLOOR 33-35 EAST MAIN ST., WATERBURY PHONE 4-4191 PAYMENTS INVITED: In addition to the custom- -f «? char ^f. account, Michaels invites payments of as little as $1 a week or $4 a month. Michaels makes available, at no added cost, the lowest terms offered by fine jewelers anywhere. JEWELERS . .. SILVERSMITHS SINCE 1900 68 BANK ST. ... AT CENTER ST., WATERBURY

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