The Mason City Globe-Gazette from Mason City, Iowa on May 6, 1936 · Page 18
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May 6, 1936

The Mason City Globe-Gazette from Mason City, Iowa · Page 18

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Mason City, Iowa
Issue Date:
Wednesday, May 6, 1936
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Page 18
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TWO MASON CITY GLOBE-GAZETTE 4 Per Cent Rate Taken by Farmers Are Attracted by Low Interest To Be . Paid. Attracted by the record low interest rate of 4 per cent on new federal land bank loans, 3,664 Iowa farmers borrowed 530,119,600 from the federal land bank and land bank commissioner in the 9. months end. ing April 1. In announcing the total loans, Gov. W. I. Myers of the farm credit association said the average land banlt loan in the state was S6.567 with an estimated interest saving to the borrower of about $105 a year, compared with the average rate which farmers refinanced had been paying on their debts. The federal land bank start ed making new loans through national farm loan associations at the contract interest rate of 4 per cent on June 24 last year. Farmers used the 4 per cent cans for refinancing higher rate debts, for buying farm and and equipment and for other general agricultural pur- oses, the governor said. The and bank made 3,047 first mortgage loans totaling S20,- )10,200. Farmers borrowing rom the emergency funds of :he land bank commissioner, many of them on second mortgage security, 109,400. WANTED HIDES - WOOL Highest Prices Paid CARL STEIN Phone 470 111 Sixth S, W. obtained $10,Low Rates Stimulate Financing 52,251 F a r m e r s Got $238,308,000 in 9 Months. Attracted by the all-time low interest rate of 4 per cent on new federal land bank loans, 52,251 fanners borrowed $238,308,000 .from the federal land hank and lank bank commiS' sioner in the 9 months ending April 1. In his statement giving the total loans, Gov. W. I. Myers of the farm credit administration said the average land bank loan was $4,325, and the low interest rate saves the borrower about $93 a year compared with the average rate which .farmers had been paying. The Uses Herd Record Book At the right L. C. Leiith, Clayton county dairyman, At h e r g . . u , , studies the herd record book which helped him develop a Hol- stcin herd which for eight consecutive years averaged more than 460 pounds of butterfat a cow on strictly two-time milk- ine Mr Lenth has been a member of the coiv testing association for IS years. At the left is shown part of the d».ry herd on his farm near Elkader. total saving is over $3,000,000 annually. The federal land bank started making new loans through national farm loan associations at the contract interest rate of 4 per cent on June 24 last year. Refinancing higher rate debts and the purchase of farm land were the principal purposes for which the 4 per cent loans were used the- governor said. The land hank made 32,341 first JOHN DEERE COMBINE I F YOU are in the market for a small, low-priced combine, be sure to see the new John Deere No. 6, 6-foot Combine before investing your money in any combine. This new combine is just what you've been asking for -- a one-man, power-driven combine that's built up to the same high-quality standard that has made the larger-sized John Deere Combines so popular in every grain-growing territory. The new John Deere No. 6 has the necessary strength in every part to give you years of low-cost, dependable service --to stay on the job saving the grain when time means money. It has the capacity to handle the heaviest crops without waste --to do the job the way you want it done. After you've seen this new combine, compared it with other small combines, you'll be convinced that it's the low-priced combine you've been wanting--the combine that will give you more years of efficient, trouble-free service on your farm; Come in and let us give you further information on this new and better combine. It's the combine that everyone is talking about-- the combine that's going to set a new quality standard in low-cost combines, Cerro Gordo Implement Co, mortgage loans totaling $137,800,000. Farmers borrowing from the emergency funds of the land bank commissioner, many of them on second mortgage security, obtained $100,508,000. Cockroach Control Measure Proposed A control measure for cockroaches recommended by 'J- A. Monro, entomologist at the North Dakota Agricultural college, consists in dusting sodium fluoride over floors and other places frequented Dy these insects. Sodium fluoride is a poisonous powder and care should be observed that it does not come in contact with foods, he warns. Where the infestations are severe the powder should be | seed corn applied in liberal quantities in ----'--··-- the dark corners of closets, at the base of walls in basements, underneath sinks, around drain pipes, behind baseboards, upon shelves or in any cracks in the wall where cockroaches are likely to hide. If the work is done thoroughly the pest will be eradicated. Cockroaches will not thrive or -become numerous where food is not available. Do not leave scraps of food open on the shelves or in any place where they are available for the pest. Keeping foods in insect- proof containers out of reach of these insects is an important aid in control. Treat Seed CornAdvice to Farmers This is Necessary in Order to Prevent Replanting. AMES--Two Iowa State college specialists today urged Iowa farmers to treat seed corn as a measure to prevent replanting. Field tests conducted for 9 years with planter box seed show an average gain of 4 bushels an acre, Dr. R. H. Porter, extension plant pathologist, and E. S. Dyas, extension farm crops specialist, stated. Of Lower Quality. Only a small portion of Iowa seed corn is nearly disease free any year and 1935 seed is oj lower quality and carries more disease organisms than usual, the specialists said. Old seed then treated will withstand more adverse conditions than if not treated. The cost of treatment is about 2 cents an acre for field corn. Planting shallow and adjusting, the planting rate to germinating power were also suggested by the specialists. Since old corn will not usually withstand adverse conditions because new crop seed and much of the 1935 crop seed shows weekened vitality, the present indications suggest that planting not more than 2 to 3 inches is desirable. Should Be Tesieil. It is advisable to plant nothing but high germinating seed if this is possible. But, the specialists asserted, in some instances a grower can get seed corn of a proved, high producing strain or variety which does not germinate as high as it should. Such seed, they continued, can often be used to advantage if care is taken to determine the exact germination and increase the rate or planting in proportion to the percentage of kernels that do not give a strong germination. ^^^ 38 Dairy Sires in Meritorious Class Thirty-eight dairy sires have qualified through the yearly production of their daughters for the 1935 Meritorious Sire awards offered by the Indiana State Dairy association, according to 3. T. Wallace of the DEAD ANIMALS OF ALL KINDS REMOVED Mason City Rendering Co. We P»y Fiione Calls Phone Purdue dairy extension department. Rules governing these awards require that a bull must have at least six daughters each with yearly lactation records of not less than 300 pounds. Such bulls qualify for a bronze medal Silver medals are awarded when not less than six daughters produce between 400 and 499 pounds fat, while a gold medal, the highest award, is made when a similar number of daughters of a sire produce 500 pounds fat or more during one lactation. Nine gold, nine silver and M bronze medals were awarded. The Holsteins received 16 medals-five gold, three silver, and eight bronze--the daughters of the five gold medal bulls averaging 562 pounds fat at the iverSge a^e of three years, two months. The daughters of the three silver medal bullsi averaged 485 pounds fat and tne Sters of the eight bronze medal bulls, 379 pounds fat. Phone 444 115 Eighth Street S. E. F R E E TO FARMERS New, Authoritative Booklet: "Hybrid Seed Corn 9 Gives valuable information on Corn and tells why the John Deere er handles it best. Stop in and ask for a copy. IMPLEMENT CO. Fhone 444 115 Eighth St S. E.

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