The Mason City Globe-Gazette from Mason City, Iowa on April 27, 1936 · Page 30
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April 27, 1936

The Mason City Globe-Gazette from Mason City, Iowa · Page 30

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Mason City, Iowa
Issue Date:
Monday, April 27, 1936
Page:
Page 30
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FOURTEEN MASON CITY GLOBE-GAZETTE 1 li ill 1 STORY TELLING IS AN ACQUIRED ART *( J Fathers Have Part to Play in Caring for, Training Baby The mother has most of. the work of feeding and caring for the baby, but the father, also, has an important part in training him. He should not leave all of the training to the mother, but should help whenever possible. Babies learn by following the example set by others. They learn more the first year of life than In any other equal period of time. Therefore, from .the very beginning, the father must be careful of his actions and speech in the baby's presence, for the little one loves to imitate what "daddy" does and says all the time. The father and mother should never disagree about the baby's care or any other matter in the presence of the baby. If the baby finds that he can go from one to the other for sympathy after he has been corrected, he will become more and more headstrong and unruly in every way. About the hardest part of being a father nowadays is trying to get a chance to be with the child long enough during the day. The well cared for baby has regular hours for sleeping, eating and playing. If the play hour comes at.some time of the day when "daddy" is not at home, then "daddy'' doesn't get much time to spend with the baby when he is awake, On Sunday morning, however, when most fathers are home, the baby may be weighed and "dad" can lend a hand. He also will find much pleasure in watching and helping with the baby's bath. On Sunday, father has a good chance to-get acquainted with his little one by helping to care for him. Relieves Constipation PARI6 MINERALIZED BREAD Builds Health A HEALTH BREAD that is so Pure and Wholesome Even Baby will thrive on it. Sold At All Leading Groceries Baked By PURITY BAKERY 26 FIRST STREET S. E. PHONE 86 EVERYDAY SAVINGS ON BABY NEEDS TALCUM POWDERS PURE CASTILE SOAPS BOTTLES AND NIPPLES PACIFIERS GLYCERIN SUPPOSITORIES BABY OILS BABY FOODS BORIC ACID COTTONS AND GAUZE INFANT SYRINGES CASTORIA Q. TIPS Here you wili find the many things for Baby's health and comfort. All most reasonably priced. You Can Always Do Better at HUXTABLE DRUG COMPANY "NORTH IOWA'S LARGEST DRUG STOCK" 116 SOUTH FEDERAL PHONE 291 They Don't Think It's a Bad World The little tots shown in the above picture are occupants of the nursery at the Park hospital. They are: Sue Ann, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Nelson, Burchinal; Harvey Sheldon, son of Mr. and Mrs. George Benowitz, 213 East State street; a baby boy, son of Mr. ana Mrs. Edwin Zook, Clear Lake; Andrew John, son of Mr. and Mrs. A. H. Roberts, Central Heights; James D., son of Mr. and Mrs. Dan Soumas, 320 Jackson avenue northwest, .and Gary Kent, son of Mr. and Mrs. T. Eau Claire, 533 Nineteenth street southeast. XUe nurses are Miss lonu WHrc, left, and Miss Groe Olesoii. (Lock Photo, Kayenay Engraving) Rages of Temper Must Be Cried Out When the baby does not get something that he wants, he will often cry and scream in order to get it. If.the mother gives in to him when he does this, he will continue to have rages in order to get things. Babies do not like to be held by force. When they are held in this way they often get angry and go into rages. Therefore, care must be taken in the way the baby is handled in order to prevent many tantrums. When the baby has a tantrum, you should not give in to him, but allow him to cry it out. Correction of Flat Feet Is Necessary The normal arch of the baby's foot, up until the time he is 2 years old, appears to be flat. The baby's foot is weak if the toes turn outward when he walks, and the foot turns over on the inside edge. To correct this, the doctor will advise that the heels of the shoes be built up on the inside edge, from one-eighth to one-quarter of an inch, until the feet are strengthened. This will cause the feet to turn in. Sometimes, little heels are put on the shoes, and the shank, or upper part of the shoe, is stiffened on the inside. SAFE for Every BABY'S BOTTLE Doctors Approve the ''Very Best" Methods! J UST any milk won't do, when the health and growth of a precious little body is concerned! It has to be PURE milk; protected and improved from the farm to sterilized bottle! Very Best Milk starts right at the farm, with sterilized implements! Then it's rushed to the Farm. Products Co. plant, and science adds its knowledge to nature's finest product, to make it CONSISTENTLY good! Is it any wonder that the proudest mothers in the city demand "Very Best" Milk? Your baby's health requires good milk. Why not rely on "Very Best?" Our Dependable Deliveries Add to Its Reliability. Just Phone 940. VERY BEST MtHLIC Grocer® . 940 -Wl DELIVER Different Types Are Suggested S e l f Confidence Is Needed to Start This Practice. By A MOTHER I am sure that no mother could have less self confidence than I had in my ability to invent stories, but again and again, when a story seemed imperative, I have literally opened my mouth and let come what will. I say this soley to encourage other mothers, for I believe it is lack of self confidence more than anything else v/hich Keeps us from embarking: on this adventure of telling- homemade stories to our children. Our first efforts may be crude, but experience will develop skill, and we have the advantage of having our audience always with us. We can tell instantly what is making a success and what had best be omitted the next time. Home-made stories have the advantage of being able to supply exactly what the situation calls for. Sometimes it is to give scope to the imagination sometimes it is to answer questions of fact sometimes it is to give help over hard places: I feel it is well worth pur taking time and effort to have stories ready to meet situations as they arise, for they are a priceless means not only of companionship with our children but of equipping them for life's adventure. Three Types Used. In my experience I have found three' types of story useful. Arranged according to dif- ficulty'in "composing," the first and easiest is what I call "daily life stories." This is a plain, unembroidered description of events which take place in the child's own life and in the lives of those about him. It interests the 2 to 4 year old. Each story centers around one event: What daddy does to get ready to go to the office; what mother saw and bought on her last shopping trip; what he himself did when he w.ent to the park and so on. Their charm for the child seems to lie in the fact that they are part of his own experience' and he is living in them as they are told. They also help to organize and interpret his experience for him and to let him view it objectively through another's eyes. One of the most useful points about these stories, as in almost all of the home-made variety, is that they can be made as short or as long as the occasion demands. "When Mother Was--." The second group of those stories are those which begin "When mother was a little girl." (In our family it is daddy who tells the prize stories oh this line, "When daddy was a little boy.") These stories can be made to give the child a sense of how different the world is today from that in which daddy and mother lived as children. "When daddy was a little boy, we didn't have any autos, or airplanes, or electric lights, or even any telephone." The third group of stories, which are also easy to tell because requiring little inventive ability, are "fact stories." When one of my boys was 3% years old, I started on this line of stories and to my surprise found keen interest. One day in. response to the familiar request, I said, "How would you like to hear how houses are built?" Then I told very simply the steps in building a house. About Building. "When a man wants to build a house, he first invites a man called an architect to draw a picture of how the house is going to look. And the architect says, 'We will put the living room here and the dining room back of it' (describing a little of the child's own house). Then the man says, 'Now we must call some workmen to dig a foundation for the house.' So the workmen come and dig a great big hole in the ground- as big as the house is going to be--for the bottom of the house to stand in," etc. This is an example of the sort of story that can be told in answer to questions as to how thingg came to be. And what child does not ask hundreds of them? 'I :

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