The Mason City Globe-Gazette from Mason City, Iowa on April 27, 1936 · Page 18
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April 27, 1936

The Mason City Globe-Gazette from Mason City, Iowa · Page 18

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Mason City, Iowa
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Monday, April 27, 1936
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Page 18
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TWO MASON CITY GLOBE-GAZETTE HOW CHILDREN CAN OVERCOME FEAR Earache Liable if Baby Catches Cold When the baby gets a cold, he is also liable to have an earache. There is a little tube that leads from the mouth to the middle part of the ear, through which infection may pass into the ear. A clean cloth, soaked in hot water, a hot water bag, or an electric pad, should be placed over the baby's ear to relieve ear pains. Care should be taken not to burn the baby when using these remedies. If the earache seems to be severe and the baby cries as if in sharp pasn or, if he has fever, the ear drum should be examined to see if the middle part of the ear is infected. It may be necessary to have the ear drum cut in ordtfr to let out the pus. When small Johnnie heard the atory of the children's crusade, he grew very grave. As he pictured the trusting children lured on to pirate ships and sold into slavery his lips quivered "Mummie," he said, that just shows! They shouldn't have taken a ride with someone they didn't know." SMARTER STYLES, BETTER JJUALITY FOR LESS--SINCE 1920 COURTESY AND SATISFACTION WITH EVERY PURCHASE 1 FOR BABY 'When you start thinking of /something new for spring, / let's not forget the (ittle ones. They will be mighty proud and happy with some of these new things we have assembled for their needs. What's a Home Without a Baby? Almost every new thing for Baby in blankets, sacques, bootees, shoes, sweater sets, dresses, slips, gertrudes, coats and sets. Price range from 25c and up. Dresses and Coats for the Older Sisters Ages 3 to 14 years. DRESSES Priced from . , $1.00 and up Washable cottons in new patterns, colors and snappy styles. Ages 2 to H years. GIRLS' COATS Priced from . . $3.95 and up Smart, new styles in all-wool fabrics. All colors. Sizes 3 to 14. DRESSES Priced from . . $1.98 and up Organdies, silks; dotted swiss, dimities. Ages 6 to 14 years. Girls' Raincapes 69c Rubber raincapes. All colors, all sizes. Junior Girls' WASH FROCKS Sara du Soix and other good makes. Youthful styles. New patterns. Ages 10'/2 to 14'/2. Priced at $2.95 and up Girls' Underthings Priced from 39c and up Slips, panties, combinations, in quality materials. Styles similar to older sister's. Ages 6 to 14 years. HATS Priced from 59c and up Lovely hats for the little girls. All new colorings. Shirley Temple ®at§ 9 Coat Sets 8 Hats Sold Exclusively Here at Our Low Prices Good and Gay "The child that Is born, on the Sabbath day Is blithe and bonny and good and gay," according to the nursery rhyme, and Evert, left, and Evelyn Jeffries, infant twin children of Mr. and Mrs. JT. T. Jeffries, 801 Jackson avenue southwest, nave an especially good opportunity for fulfillment of the prophesy because they were born on Easter Sunday. Evert weighed six pounds at birth and Evelyn, five and one- half. Mr. Jeffries is employed at Deckers. (Lock Photo, Kayenay Engraving) x SEE YOU TOMORROW" Creeping Exercise for Baby Seventh or E i g h t h Month Crawling Time. About the seventh or eighth month is crawling time for the baby. "Creeping is good exercise for him, ana helps make the muscles of the whole body strong. Sometimes a mother does not allow the baby to creep because she is afraid to put him on the bare floor, which may be dirty or cold. It is true that the bare floor is not the right place for creeping. But a safe, warm, clean place can be provided in a creeping-pen, or in a fenced- off space in a light corner of the room or porch. This space should be about four feet square and, in order that the baby may be kept clean, the floor should have a clean covering, such as canvas or a blanket that can be washed. At this time the baby should wear rompers, and either loose, soft-soled shoes, or thick socks, to protect the tender skin of his feet. Be sure that his stockings and shoes are big enough for him. The stockings shrink when washed and, unless they are a little large when bought, they will draw the little toes up under the feet. Take proper care of the toe nails; see that they are cut straight across and not too short. See, also, that there are no red spots on the feet caused by creases in the stockings or fay shoes that are too tight. Let your baby creep, but do not urge him to do so. The safest plan is to have things arranged so that he can creep when he feels like it. Creeping babies never stay in the same place; they must be watched constantly unless they are in a creeping-pen. Usually, the first serious fall a baby gets is the result of his being left alone on a bed, table or chair, off which he can wriggle or crawl. Never leave the baby alone in any place where there is danger of his falling. Also see that all stairways are guarded. Do not trust to luck to protect your baby, but see to it -that there is no possible chance of his falling or being injured in any way. GAIN IN WELGHT The average weight for the seven months old baby is from 16 to 17 pounds. The' baby should continue to gain an av- erag-e of four ounces a week, or about a pound a month. Keep on · weighing the baby every two weeks. Weigh the baby at the same hour each day he is weighed, because the weight varies at different times durii.-j the day. Confidence Is Quieting to Emotions Careful Handling Is Needed When They Are Afraid. "Mother! Mother!" screamed a little girl, horror in her voice, her body trembling. Mother rushed to rescue her daughter from danger and found -- a small red ant on the sidewalk proceeding in the girl's general direction and scarcely a yard from where she stood, transfixed! Mother could not help laughing, even while she reassured and comforted Marion, and it was about the best thing she could have done, for it proved to the little girl as no amount of explanation could that the whole thing was not serious situation. Confidence breeds confidence, as surely as fear breeds fear. The girl's mother found time later, when emotions had quieted down, to help her small daughter become acquainted with ants as interesting little people in their own right. It was not more than two years later that Marion came skipping in barefoot to announce merrily, "Oh, mother, just now in the orchard a little green snake ran right over my foot! My, he was so cold and tickly! A little one, all alone--I guess he was looking for his mummy." Fears Come and Go. Fears come and go, and it is easier, sometimes, to know what to do for the child than to understand where the fears of a timid child come from in the first place. The new born baby, they tell us, fears only two things! Loss of support or the sensation of falling and sudden loud noises. Soon, however, he transfers this fear response to any things which may have been associated, however accidentally, with either of the two original causes of fright He fears the kitchen because once the thunder frightened him just as he was carried into that room; or he cries at sight of his floating duck because he was looking at it when he lost his balance in his bath. Then he becomes afraid of the hairbrush that is kept beside the duck. It is easy to understand how the baby acquires this type of fear, even when we don't know what particular experience led to it, but by the time the child is 3 he may have a host of fears which cannot be so simply explained. Things with which we know he has no associations because he has never encountered them before terrify him and he is now able to run about and explore a great many new things. Is "Reign of Terror." · This is one reason why the age from 3 to 6 may come as near being a "reign of terror" as any time in the child's life. It is always possible, of course, that the fear is an association fear even when the object is unfamiliar! A furry bunny may suggest a cat or dog which the baby has learned to fear, but there is also developing a distrust of the unknown as such. To the newborn the whole world is unfamiliar, but to the 3 year old who is pretty well acquainted with his own little niche, the unfamiliar begins, by contrast, to look full of dangerous possibilities. He has not yet had enough experience to be able to judge which, of even rather ordinary things, he may trust. By 6, if wisely guided, he will have developed considerable judgment and discretion about simple matters and will again be living in a comparatively stable and reliable world. What Baby Can Do in Seventh Month During the seventh month, the average baby is able to: 1. Sit up alone without support for a few moments. 2. Hold onto an object with each hand. 3. Make the sounds of several different syllables, such as ah, eh, or oo. 4. Make cooing and crowing sounds. 5. Tell the difference be- teen strangers' and those whom he knows. 6. Bang upon the table or on a plate with a spoon in play.

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