The Mason City Globe-Gazette from Mason City, Iowa on January 13, 1943 · Page 13
Get access to this page with a Free Trial
Click to view larger version
January 13, 1943

The Mason City Globe-Gazette from Mason City, Iowa · Page 13

Publication:
Location:
Mason City, Iowa
Issue Date:
Wednesday, January 13, 1943
Page:
Page 13
Cancel
Start Free Trial

Page 13 article text (OCR)

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 13, 1943 ^Embattled £ ^Klfllfeh W i f^OFttia f Mtfat *-vj«*« ^^^^TM *' ,_- MASON CITY GLOBE-GAZETTE ' CHAPTER FORTY-ONE I CHOPPO'S AIM at the base of Jiros skull was quick, but very sure. Jiro had taught the child well. The Japanese stopped leering and suddenly sprawled in an unconscious heap on top of Rest- \vjck Carnes. ''You wasn't doing so good chum," observed Choppo. ' "While the red-haired man extricated himself from that loathsome hold, the little boy delved into Jiros market basket. After Rusty's attack on it the contents were a jumbled mess. All the same, everything was there. Tsvo cameras, instead of one, several rolls of film, even some pictures that could easily have been 'snapped the previous afternoon Soldiers and sailors celebrating in the garden of a ddnking place, grinning Japanese proprietors Jiro must have hurried !o develop them. "Makin' fun!" fumed Choppo. Rusty was propped on one elbow, fighting to get great gulps of fresh air into his starved lungs. The incensed youngster thrust the offensive snapshots beneath his friend's face. There was a story in them: The man knew. Proof that the Americans were weak and debaucherous. Pictured propaganda to add to the already supercharged conceit of the Japanese. Choppo did not exactly understand. Yet something in the pictures had spoken to him. "Makin' fun!" was undeniably descriptive. Restwick Carries' head was beginning to feel as if it were a part of his body, instead of some . separate whirling object. "Choppo," he said in a hoarse voice, "go grab the first policeman or soldier you see and bring him here." '·You sure you can manage that rat?" Rusty stretched for the iron pipe. "Yen!" The child, decided Rusty, must have traveled at a speed that made a blur of his spindly legs, because in no time he was back with a soldier whose gun had a bayonet so sharply capable that Restwick Carncs slid the iron pipe behind him. "Good work," praised the soldier as he grasped the significance of the contents of Jiro's baskets. The red-haired man lifted a tired hand toward Choppo. "He did it." Self-pride was beginning to wear on the little boy. He wriggled with embarrassment. Fortunately, at that moment, Jiro stirred and opened his eyes. "Crawl back into the woodwork!" yelled Choppo. A grin passed over Jiro's face, a grin riot decipherable to the child. "Look at the dizzy dope!" the boy told the two men. "Grinning like that. He must be 'mysterieal!'" Not evident to him was. the fact that Jiro already had done his best work, that forthcoming punishment would be an honor. If they killed him he would be dying for his country. It would be next thing to taking a suicide dive. He grinned aguin when the soldier pointed his bayonet and ordered him to march ahead. Back in the car neither Rusty nor Choppo spoke for a brief moment. Suddenly the little boy asked gruffly, "Well, what do we do now?" "Maybe we'd better go back to the hotel." "And leave all this trouble, all these fires and sick soldiers and Jiro guys hanging around? We gotta help--aw. Rusty, stop!" He turned away from the sight of tears sliding down the man's burnished cheeks. Restwick Carnes was weeping from bodily fatigue and pain, from the devastation done his country. But too, he was weeping from a poisonous knowledge that had crept into his unwilling mind. He was afraid. Beneath his bustling help, back of his splendid family name, he was afraid. Lily-livered! Paige had been right. Luckily the boy did not dream of such trepidation in the heart of his idol. He did not dream that Rusty wanted to crawl away to some hiding place and pretend nothing had happened. Rusty's tears he compared to his own, that he was managing to hold back, that he MUST hold back, because of Rusty. "Phooey! Everyone gels blubbery now and then." He slapped his bare knees. "Know what's in there? Butter. Sloppy melted butter." Restwick Carnes grinned at the SCOTTSSCRAP BOOK By RJ. SCOTT Ni; -fkt RAISED SCA8.S of HtB. MARK WftldU HE.MA.IH LONGER AS-IXoPotES, on.-TOADS? -TRIBE -A WTA- BUIUS "NURSERIES* WB.YHE BABIES m -fHt fo*M of COKICM: OH SflLIS- -rtlL ONI* OrtHlKfi'lS CLOSED W KKHK" WlYH A, Bli WM OF GRASi «*«**· MflQU^T* M »UUJ DAILY CROSSWORD ACROSS 1. Wrap in waxed cloth 5. Arabian garments fl. Elliptical 10. Carry by assault 11. Star 12. Place of worship 14. Cut 4. Guido's 27. Period of highest note years 5. Macaw 6. Ship partition 1. Flower 8. Form 11. Thin silk 13. Free of 17. Knocks 18. Silicon (sym.) irregularly 20. Sign of 15. Military cap infinitiv* ' IS. Change 18. Fragment 19. Potato 21. Head covering 24. Italian river 25.Nativeot Arabia 29. Smells 31. Maxim 32. Departed 33. King of Bash»n 3 4. Damp 35. Light boat 38. P««ps 41, Dresse* 45. Untie 46. Hindu garment 47. Indian of Bahamas 49. Oil ot rose petals 50. Hint 51. Portuguese money 52. Gull-like bird SJ.Godof Iov« DOWN 1. A resin 2-Putoul 3. Tennis implement 21. Pig 22. Fuss 23. Weight 26. Uncooked 28. Wager 30. Book of tables 31. Eager 33. Ahead 36. Like 37. Holiday 38. Place 39. Make into a law 40. Roman magistrate 42. Proportion 43. Metal 44.Title of respect QD0 13130 raraara RIDEIE nBnn nosa HOEE HHOHE ase sac GO n BOB tson EEBHQ QQPQ aac ana QBE QUO Q OB Dan saa C10QQB SOEC nt-iiSB ciacjQ ssrsr 3 aaons Veittrd«y°* Auwef 48. Possess 49. Metric measure n CRTPTOQCOTE-- A cryp M J B T B K Y S W P I J M Y S W E D W U B W. Yesterday's Cryptoqnolc: TYRANNY MUST BE, THOUGH TO iTHfi TYRANT THEREBY NO EXCUSE-- MILTON. F E Y B K Y S Y J Y S W B W R C ' J P F P Q -- E S U C W - child. For his sake, he must get lold oi himself. He must keep try- ng to help. He must do something important. "Choppo," he demanded, "will you wait for me right icre?" 'What? Again? No!" 'For just a while?" 'You didn't win any prizes the ast time I let you out alone. I'd better stick with you." His brow clenched. ''What's buzzin', pal?" "Ah idea--crazy, maybe, but I'm -- darned mad at these Japs, it seems plausible." ·What does that mean?" "Possible." ·1 catch. 'Could do.' Let's have ' The childish crinkles between Choppo's eyes deepened as he listened. "Couldn't do!" he decreed abruptly. "You ain't even got a ji on your plane." "There are plenty of loose machine guns at Hickam. If I got one of those and a soldier to shoot it and got my ship warmed up--we might get a few Japs." "And they might gel you--yell, nd supposin' our own suys down icre didn't know you when you ·as flyin' around? The guvs shootin' the big anti-guns. That's put you behind the eight ball, chum." The youngster's brilliant reas- mng held Rusty speechless for a while. Too, he was shamefully glad he had been talked out of it, and a bit shocked to realize that the danger of it had been evident to Choppo, but not to him. I must be a nit-wit, he thought to himself. Choppo's tired, hoarse voice di- ected, "Snap out of it, pa!. Start this crate and let's get another vic- tim. And if you're still in the notion of spilling any blood, spill it at the hospital, wheve they're taking it for wounded people." As the day moved on, in long tortuous hours, people learned t h a t Hickam lost hangars, barracks, olher buildings. Hen had been caught in ships in Ihe harbor. Others had been shot in the water, still more in the airfields, as they raced to save what they could of the doomed planes. Ford island had been strafed again and again. Worse even, defenseless civilians had been strafed as they van for safety. That cruelty seemed to be one of the delights of the yellow devils. Restwick Carries knew now how slim the chances ot battling an enemy plane would have been. Only a fe\v escaped damage long enough to be warmed up and sent into the sky. Those few thundered bravely into dogfights that astounded the Japs, thrilled the people of Hawaii and glorified the darins pilots. But they were so pitifully few. Practically all the planes on the ground, helpless and uncovered, were kindling, not fighting. They exploded, flamed, smoldered. Blame bounced here and there. The population was heartsick and disillusioned, filled with questions, all bitter. After hours of ambulance duty, maddening because they could carry only one person. Rusty finally headed toward the Queen's hospital to donate blood. While he stood in line, with all imaginable types-young, too old, white, foreign, even some Japanese were there, .vhelhcr loyal or not no one {new. Even a spy would give Mood to prove his "loyalty." But while he stood in line, Rcslwiclt "arnes tried not to see all this. :Ie tried to close his eyes and cars against everything revolu- :ionary to his life. lie tried to .hink only of Hawaii as he knew it up to today. Choppo was waiting in the automobile. Certain that he had BOARD AND ROOM By GENE AHERN Eftl'MS UP FOR.'EM, EH ? THIS 15 THHIR. HIDEOUT/-,---VEH-- UDMGHOR.M UEO,' THE Ct! CAITL.S-RUSTLER./--- CMS?, THIS COYOTE v.OULD STEAL AN ICE FLOE , fW2,\\ I UMDEfi. A -7/7 TOLAR B-B-BJT. ,'.'.Y GOOT5 WAN. THIS IS FUFFLE'S LODGING HOWE,-I'.'A SUB-H TKSRH AUST 3= SO.vE M1STAK.E,-- -- THERE ARE MO BEELER. BOYS HERS / JUDGE, HE'S HERE- AGAIN f MODEST MAIDENS "/ managed to get in a little golf down South ^before I lost my ball," ^STRICTLY PRIVATE" W£ DK I W« OWP LltE , ENOUGH TO TELL WER THW , - -- (QHW.-.'SO SHE SWKttb TO AWKE UP R3R XT IV LEWN Afe P^- rtTCVTOES YOUR. missed one of the most important sequences of the day, he greeted Rusty coldly, rebellion showing in every muscle. There was rebellion in Rest- wick Carnes also, rebellion toward the weakness that was gripping him. Surely a healthy person would give a little blood without wanting to keel over. He was driving slowly. "Some day, huh, Choppo?" "Yep. Little diff'rent from playing on Waikiki beach." Rusly nodded. "And the trouble is just beginning." Occasional shellrirc, that was miles away, sounded all too close. "Sleep in your clothes tonight, Choppo." Hestwick Carnes' voice was dull. "Abby probably will be sleeping in hers tonight, too." "Abby? Why?" AH of a sudden the little boy knew. He broke SCORCHY SMITH- into wild sobs. Reslwick Carnes wished he had not said anything, yet it was gratifying to see th» little red-head's damp devotion for Ihc woman who had given him everything. Ho must tell Abby how much Choppo cared lor her. But when? When would he see Abby again? (To Be Continued) By FRANK ROBBINS MUGGS AND SKEETER By WALLY BISHOf BIG SISTER- . CAN'T HAVE VOU WJNNIN LOOSE \NHAt YOU'\E SEEM. rTwrrfr,-, , ..., YOU'RE SOIN' M^f^T,^: M6 LCJvJoc;, I -By LES FORGRAVE THE KIDS PUTT1N' UP A GOOD FIGHT. 1jy r I GUESS MY HELP IS MEEDEO.' *^% ft* OAKY DOAKS- wteZ" ^·«^Sf ' -^ortaW COMCE4TULAT1ONS, HAP ON THAT 6EAUTIFUL WCK/ YOU KNOCKED 'EM 8OTHCOLD/ MAM/ YOU GUYS WONT FEEL SO SMAPT WHEW I GET THROUGH WITH YOU.O^- ^--^ J.-B ETTA KETT AND DOK-S I'LL LICIT YOU FIRST.' By PAUL ROBINSON BRICK BRADFORD RlOC=V AND I VJ32S =D O\C= --· 1 VVAS A FOOL N ~ KM WMEN S RAU.EM POT SOU NOVO - AND [ KNOW HOVJ FES!. SO GEr IN THE AND PITCH I'M 83WING ., OUT 3 --By WILLIAM RITT and CLARENCE GRAY STOP.' VVE HEARB EHOUGH OF YOUR iu. news: VOU TtLl. MS MV CHOICE IAU6T BE. THIS -- TKfVT WE PERISH HEPE. OS? smrwt EH ROUTE TO ouitowH LUND; BUT - HM -- TPEHE. IS AMPlE FOOE US-KlTHEClTY WHERE BRADFORD RULES: 50 WEV.'IUATTACK HIM VJ1THOU1 BEtAY.' By CHARLES RAAB we CANNOT COHTIHUE TO A.CC6PT HOSP1TAUTV WE CAHHOT nepucv.--So MUST -TMA.MK BB MAOE OBJECTS Of CHARIT; TA.TTERS; I SHALU AND EARN ADVENTURES OF PATSY DICKIE DARE By COULTON WAUGH ffAH£"rrw[ £J »e Goes, Mease MTV 4 KNIFE NONE HAMP- --

Get full access with a Free Trial

Start Free Trial

What members have found on this page