The Mason City Globe-Gazette from Mason City, Iowa on April 3, 1934 · Page 18
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April 3, 1934

The Mason City Globe-Gazette from Mason City, Iowa · Page 18

Publication:
Location:
Mason City, Iowa
Issue Date:
Tuesday, April 3, 1934
Page:
Page 18
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Page 18 article text (OCR)

TWO MASON CITY GLOBE-GAZETTE TUESDAY, APRIL 3, 1934 CEMENT PLANT WILL REOPEN SOON Market for Small Home Increasing Display at Century of Progress Proves Inspiration. The entire home building Industry has recognized the rap"idly increasing demand of the market for a small home which can be built at a reasonable cost, and at the same time afford a construction which is as ^durable as it is physically attractive. Statistics show that the small home construction has been increasing by leaps and bounds during the last year and especially during the last two or three months. It is in this all important field that the brick manufacturer, because of the natural adaptability of clay products and their proved efficiency over a period of years, has every advantage In his product to offer to the home builder. Wants Pleasing Home. The small home builder is not generally interested in fads and fancies when it comes to building the site of his fireside. He is demanding a home which is pleasing to the eye, a home which is durable and fire-safe and which will stand time and weathering without expensive maintenance costs. True, this is a lot to ask for the relatively low cost at which he expects to purchase his home--but the clay products manufacturer has prepared to meet that need and is in a position to offer each home building prospect just what he wants for his own house. One of the greatest inspirations to potential home builders recently was the housing and industrial arts display at the Century of Progress. Prominent in the group of 12 model homes displayed there was the Brick Manufacturers' association reinforced brick masonry house, which was inspected by thousands. It is an all brick house erected with steel reinforcing and is the last word in fire .and storm resistivencss. With its brick floors and brick interior walls; its unusual design which provides a most efficient arrangement for furni- ture, this house was the subject of much favorable comment. Is Economical. As one woman was heard to say, "Well, I'd certainly like a house like that. Just imagine, you pay the first cost and then there is nothing else to worry about! No painting on the outside and no decoration on the inside, and it'll last a lifetime." And therein lies the fascination of the brick house; its sturdi- nesa and its economy. It stands as a strong testimonial for brick construction. There are strong, proved reasons for the advantages of the brick house, which in reality were responsible for the fact that this woman chose the, brick house as her favorite. The (ContlWKd «· IMPROVE THE APPEARANCE OF YOUR PROPERTY... Play Safe . . . Use Henkel's Ready-Mixed Concrete \ Accept Only the Most Perfect Concrete for... FOUNDATIONS SIDEWALKS DRIVEWAYS LILY POOLS BASEMENT FLOORS GARAGE FLOORS, Etc. We Are Dealers for TRUSCON STEEL CO PRODUCTS "Clerespan" Trusses Steel Windows Metal Lath Wire Mesh Expanded Corner Bead Copper Steel Standard Lintels "Safety-Tread" Steel Elate Coal Chutes "All-Steel" Highway Crossings Expanded Contraction Plates "Duraguard" Guard Rail Reinforced Bars Steel Deck Roofs Steel Joists Let Us Estimate the Cost of Some of These Improvements For You Agents f o r . . . IOWA CONCRETE CRIB SILO CO. CINDER CONCRETE BUILDING BLOCKS for SOUND PROOFING PURPOSES HENKEL CONCRETE AND SUPPLY COMPANY PHONE 2626 525 NINTH STREET S. E. Completing Substantial Repair Job Shipments Being Made to All Sections of Territory. The Northwestern States Portland Cement company is making plans to reopen in the near future after an extensive program of repairs and .overhauling-, according to B. A. MacDonald, assistant to the president of the corporation. Shipments are being made to all sections of the company's territory, and, although these are light, they indicate a substantial recovery from the conditions of a year ago. The of Dicers of the company, headed by Col Hanford MacNider, president, are viewing the future with a restrained optimism. Knowing that any marked recovery is going to mean substantial increases in building and general construction work, they are confident the demand tor cement is certain to increase over the coming months. The repair program at the plant this spring is the most extensive for several years. More than the usual number of men have been kept on the job to handle the overhauling operations. When the plant is reopened, which event is expected to take place within the next few weeks, the officers of the company plan to continue operation for the remainder of the year. A supreme court decision, recently handed down, now permits the Northwestern States Portland Cement company to proceed with the reorganization into an Iowa corporation instead of a West Virginia institution. Properties Need Work in America Ninety Per Cent of All Residences Must Be Conditioned. Ninety per cent of the residential properties in the United States today need minor or major repairs, alterations or modernization. Official cognizance of this condition is evident in recent and current interest in slum clearance and rehabilitation of blighted areas; housing projects to replace worn-out and dilapidated buildings are but one form of modernization. Throughout the country are millions of residential buildings, many of them fully as poor for housing as slum section building's, but not noticed because they are isolated In better neighborhoods. Even the best looking residential properties are found upon examination to need maintenance, work ranging from the replacement of a corroded pipe to entire new roofs, floors or walls. The money spent for modernization and repair work immediately passes into circulation through the tills of local merchants of every description; it is used by labor to pay off standing obligations and to purchase new consumer goods. Since more than half of all the money spent for modernization and home repairs goes to pay labor on the job, it is apparent that stimulation of this kind of work--which can be got under way without a long period of planning--has broad immediate beneficial effects on unemployment, on local retail trade and in the promotion of the production of capital goods such as lumber, cement, paints and varnishes, glass, tile, plumbing and heating equipment, electrical supplies, etc.

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