The Mason City Globe-Gazette from Mason City, Iowa on March 24, 1934 · Page 3
Get access to this page with a Free Trial
Click to view larger version
March 24, 1934

The Mason City Globe-Gazette from Mason City, Iowa · Page 3

Publication:
Location:
Mason City, Iowa
Issue Date:
Saturday, March 24, 1934
Page:
Page 3
Cancel
Start Free Trial

Page 3 article text (OCR)

: !fei MARCH 24, 1934 MASON CITY GLOBEGAZETTE LEE P. LOOM1S W. EARL HALL ENOCH A. NOREM LLQjfD L. GEER Publisher Managing Editor · - - City Editor Advertising Manager ,,,,,,.,,. _ OF THE ASSOCIATED rKj-,£js--The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for publication of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise credited in this paper, and jUso all local news published herein. SUBSCRIPTION KATES and compromise. Mussolini seems to be making a realistic and laudable effort. But most of the rest of the statesmen seem to have lost their heads and thrown up the sponge. They have decided that nothing can avert war, and turned their attention to preparing for it. As for generously undoing the wrongs of Versailles -it doesn't seem to have occurred to anyone that this might be a way out. Though millions die the wrong headed greed of the World war victors must be vindicated! MASON CITY GLOBE-GAZETTE · ----DAILY SCRAP BOOK THREE .. . . ... J7.00 By mall 0 months ... S .15 By mall 3 months i;; - ; * 4 -°° By mall I mony, OUTSIDE 100 MILE ZONE 56.00 Six months. . J3.00 Lake, . 5200 . J1.25 . S .00 Three months. .Sl.nn LAWS AGAINST LYNCHING 'pHE tardiness with which America is moving, against mob-murder--called lynching--is evident from the fact that while 36 of the 48 states have laws against lynching, only 9 of them make it specifically a crime, according to a compilation made by the American Legislators' association in the March issue of State'Government. The laws, according to this report, are of three types: (1) To punish members of a lynching mob or sheriffs who permit a prisoner to be lynched; (2) To make cities or counties liable for reparation in money for damages suffered at the hands of a mob; (3) To order a special- term of court to try the prisoner promptly, thereby removing the excuse that the regular process of law is too slow. Arkansas is the only state that has the preventive measure of the third type. In 20 states prisoners may be sent to another county if there is'danger of mob violence. The punishment usually provided where lynching is a "crime" is life imprisonment or death. Three of the states impose a lesser penalty in prison sentences. Kansas, Kentucky, Pennsylvania, Virginia Pertinent or impertinent Of course the husband won't admit it--he's too h / V o , x' n eart , h6 iS P ' eaSed with th * ProVect lAhat . « le , Globe " Gazettes cooking school to be held April 3, 4, 5 and 6 will bring him a little change of * * « The mad race in European countries to hring more children into the world appears to have the dual purpose of supplying more cannon fodder for war and more unemployed for peace. * * * That representative who is crowing about Jim Farley's great achievement in wrecking the airmail service would probably say that Lee had a great day at Appomattox. a * * Most veterans would rather have honesty than hokum from their representatvies at Washington with regard to the bonus. * » e Maybe it's the ability to borrow money cheaply that gives Washington the idea of starting something new every day. OTHER VIEWPOINTS and West Virginia make it as much a crime to be party to a lynching as to perform the act. Statutes imposing liabilities on cities or counties for-permitting mob violence are more common The maximum amounts which the local governments may be compelled to pay range from ?5,000 in Illinois, New Jersey, Ohio and West Virginia, to $10,000 in Penn- Three states do not prescribe a maximum smallest damage BLAME THE CABINET "YES MEN!" David Lawrence in United States News: One day last month, the president of the United States, surrounded by a group of his cabinet officers and advisers, decided to approve the cancellation of all airmail contracts. The president asked if the army could carry the mails. Somebody answered "Yes, Mr President." Today we mourn the loss of ten army flyers killed in line of duty. Today the airmail service which took 16 years to build has been disrupted. The-few millions of dollars alleged to have fraudulently enriched the pockets of airmail speculators sylvania. amount. In South Carolina, the which may be awarded is 52,000. Nine states have statutes which require the removal of sheriffs who permit their prisoners to be lynched. The officers may be reinstated if they can show that every reasonable precaution was taken to prevent the lynching. Attention of state legislators is invited in this article to a model lynching law, drawn up recently, which contains more stringent provisions. Among these are: (1) Removal of the offending sheriff and peace officer by the governor, and makiEg them civilly "·liablet6-'tlie victim or his estate for damages; -(2) Substituting- information for indictment and allowing] Uve Bunder we n - ave seen to a ^eca'de trustworthy hearsay evidence; (3) Providing for ef- ,, ~ -----· ZZZSZfttJSZi - St THE MURPHY APPOINTMENT E!«^25?SHH JF, entirely independent of politics and with no limit would, if they could be recovered, never offset the loss of life. For human rights supersede property rights. Who then killed the ten army flyers? Bureaucracy and sycophancy at its worst. Even a smattering knowledge of commercial aviation and the airmail problem was bound to have included information on the hazards of night flying and the fact that the army was not trained to the task. But more important is this question: What emergency required such an abrupt cancellation and the issuance of orders to the army to take up the airmail task in midwinter, without preparation? Why could not the army have been ordered to take over the job in 60 or 90 days? At least milder weather would then have been encountered and there would have been opportunity to enlist the services of trained pilots. Several of the commercial companies offered to lend their pilots to the army. Why were not such offers accepted? The postoffice appropriation law provided that before any cancellation of a contract, the interested Why CANADIAN BOAT CAM. ON JLAND OR -- WHEN MOVINQ FROM ONE LAKE ro ANOTHER A CABLE '5 FAS-TEND FROM A CAPS-TAN BOA-f-ro AlARqE -TREE -PULLING HSH.F UNDER OWN ACROSS IN I8oo 'TWERE. But" ONE MlLLIONAl -1HERE. WERE. 29.7OO BEET REDUCED -to MORE THAN AN EiqHTK OF ifs WEIGHT" BY REDUCTION -TO REFINED SUGAR OBSERVING suppose more crimes at committed in the name "tree-trimming" than, in an other .single activity generally ac cepted as innocent and innocuous used to smile at the term "tree sut eon" but observation of the de ruand for knowledge in this fie] :as convinced me that it's a prett wt expression. 'Hie untrained tre trimmer with saw and prunin, shears can accomplish almost a. much destruction in a row or tree as a man armed with a sharp knif who was unskilled in surgery migli n a hospital ward. Maybe that's bit overdrawn but my point stil lands that the trimming of trees i 10 assignment for a man. or j group of men, not specifically train d for the. job. and ia st year 1933 a persons met death realize that in admonishing motorists to be "afraid o the dark," I am moving counter to on e of the principa teachings of parents to their children, But look at the figures. In the four hour period between » o clock p. total of 9,720 m motoring- accidents. This is contrast with the 2,550 killed in the four rush hours of the morning 6 to 10 o'lock. In the former case there is about an 80 per cent dependence on illumination; in the latter case, there is an almost 100 per cent independence on illumination Authorities responsible for developing these statistics state that the safe operation of automobiles at night demands that speed never exceed the stopping distance of approximately 100 feet provided by effective range of car's lamps. This distance corresponds to 35 miles an hour. DIET and HEALTH administra- By LOGAN CLENUE.MNG. M. O." SHOW HOW FOLK SLEEP EXPLANATIONS of sleep have been furnished by *~ many people, but no one has been universally aCCt l P te ^-, Some thil * it is due to a chemical change in the body; others think it is a change in the tonus oj the muscles, and others have a psychological ex- EARLIER DAYS An InterMllnj nail, Featnre Dra^-n FTM, tho Olobe-OaMttf. Hies of Ihn YMIM Gono Uj-. logi planation. Although we do not know the cause of sleep, we know a good deal about what happens during sleep. Recently observations on sleeping children have shown that they have certain sleep patterns. All people, of course, move somewhat during their sleep, and ,no two peo pie have the same patterns in re gard to this, · so that there 'ar restless sleepers" and "quiet sleep Thirty Years Ago -J. H. Anderson departed this morning- for Mount Vernon and Des Moines on a business trip. C. H. McNider and Treasurer Borst of the M W A have returned from a visit at Holstein, where they there g over the finan cial conditions of the lodge w7,^f . Joh . nst) ' n departed last evening for Des Moines where he has a permanent position Miss Margaret Brown of Northfield, Minn, ar- M 1 e r for her home ers," and usually when the pattern has b e e n --··-*-"-· - ·· through life. established it last Children who are restless sleep ers, for instance, will move approxi plan suggested is to I j n the fir«,r *,, tmate 'y .*"" aBd one -half times more of Paul Revere like, L which t£ hL TM qU 't s l ee P ers - The P^od dur =-··-- -5 "^" «. town where bandits utls aftTr , e - bo( ? v Is most act 've is the first 30 min- -. -- *--= *,,*»,,, «, | AnothPr « n ,J.£ 1 ?- SCa H er p .° ster tacks verv generously. ttTi^osf m f.? · "f* gUD ' and the period whlch is " ^*·?· **»*·«?---Aboard of gSruS s^j^"TM*^^TM t!° - t q ^"A"Esrt 3 ? hoto «-s^ ··m salary, Governor Herring had gone into the on to a11 highways leading into a open market in quest of the ablest possible person to * . - work. . assessment and review, he couldn't have selected a bet- a ' fair and square in all his judgments and he may be The tea? »« «£m *?"¥* " e ° n hand in eaca b ^relied to bring to his assignment an intelligence and bandits $f Stve'rfnluch uE? ^K \ th ? understanding not surpassed anywhere. It's the state's\^* Lea has a supprjo?these bombs ° f good fortune that Mr. Murphy has been prevailed upon to perform this service. NEW SOMETHING NEW pRESIDENT ROOSEVELT'S request--virtually y at Ma| Potential value' «?£% SfaTsuch^ waking up. peri ° d is the hom before the nlrl "irtp» t? ??° t! ? -° f beverages on sleep confirms rpfwnt TM at dnukin g- a glass of warm milk on retiring induces quiet sleep. These experiments were checked by giving children cold water and _then warm water on retiring in sleep were restlessness, h p jf which all the escape is to get they have committed command--that the warring ranks of railway and automobile employers and workers meet him in Washington for a discussion of the impending strikes in,~ 6 ^ u - el , u ,ppea cars rumt r, ^ - * tnese two vital industries may be an historic occasion. "P in a comparatively small ar« a ^ Uld ,. b ? botUed Other presidents have intervenes in industrial dis- ^"J Id be onl y a matter of a short time As It" putes before this. But no president has ever come brandish h £ach° d ° ' S t0 scatter a few'roofin to such a conference clothed with the power which | the larger cities. SUnS ' heir P ursuers a nd avoid Eating a large meal before going to have to | the «S^ ^^^^^^/^ : the question of giving cold water, and it cannot be influenced the sleep pattern see that one of Adolph Hitler's scholars is credited with doing what up to this time has been regarded as a mathematical impossibility. He has, according to the Deutsche Allgemeine -ieitung, succeeded in squaring a circle. Here's how: The area of a circle is equal to the square of the hypotenuse of a right angled triangle whose one cathetus represents the longest side ot an Oberl trapezium and whose short cathetus equals the distance from the center of the circle to the point of intersection of diagonals of the circle surrounding the trapezium. These two diagonals intersect m a section area and simultaneously at a right angle. Now why didn't some of us think A^ b ? f ? re? So very simple, isn't All right, let's see you square a wonder," writes Mrs. Frank Bangs of Dovvs, "whether the following would appeal to Globe-Gazette readers as it ha* to me: I fancy that 1 hear Him say I nave you green Brass and the trees Tho beauty of returning spring And you B rc\v blind to all o( these And coinn of metal hard and cold Held you forever 'Heath their spell F.OW--since their Joy you couldn't hole A sorry tale at life you tell 1 rave you stutr for pleasant drcanw And summer birds with endless song l etched your land with silver streanu ior you to find and stroll along And friends where'er j- ou choose to dws'u But money was the thins J-ou sought Isow lire Is bitterness, you tell save you gardens wondrous fair And fruits of trees and spreading vint lou turned them Into fields of care And wanted richer Joys than Mine yju gave your faith to wealth alone i ractlccil each day to buy and Bell. Now miming all you might have known V sorry tale of life you tell. --o-fear F. K. F. of Iowa Falls just isn't going to live down, his failure to see that 'corns" and "an old shoe" go logically together. The following is "rom M. S. D. of Garner: "F. E. F. of Iowa Falls cannot gee tiow 'old shoes' are 'good for the orn,' in his riddle. Is it possible ie's never had a 'corn' on his toe, or experienced the excruciating iscomfort of a new shoe on that orn? Then he must be one of a rivilcged few, as I seem to be. I'm ure 'old shoe' is the answer." --o-think it's no mean compliment to the cultural attainments of our community iat year after year Mason city is epresented by more entries in the ay production contest at the Uni- ersity of Iowa than any other .ace in Iowa. Even when we lose in the competition, we are winner in the showing that we make. Incidentally, however, we have don e far more than our share of winning- in the competition. note by a news dispatch that the railroads in Switzerland have worked out a plan whereby patrons are given an annual rate of SI2. With their yearly ticket they are able to board a train anywhere and go anywhere within that tiny republic 1 . The report says the plan is working out most satisfactorily. American railroads offer special inducements to commuters m the cities but so far as I know, there is nothing approaching the Swiss annual ticket for the ordinary user of the railroads. It probably would be impracticable in a countrv so expansive. Mrs. Jack Delaney is Rockwell. Twenty Years Ago -- or a short visit with visiting her relatives in r n . i f ' s a c c e P e a p Casualty company of New York city. " and Mrs - acce P te l a position with Governor Warren Garst arrived in the ftiercial club. Vr-oni- TOl W Crrt f aIi S ed ^ a menlber Of the Mason Cit y OOi Doa.In Tnr 1 tTia fr*e*t. *-:^ j _ _ i ^ ... , j - i . the flrst time in Stockma " wa, inducted into BIaise Mike Moreweiser returned to his home in K 8 * a " er C0mpleti "£ bu s ress ln Dyer of in any way whatever. 1 definite. resides in. President Roosevelt. By intervention he has put into gear the great power granted to him under the NTRA. He has taken upon himself, in a very real sense, the responsibility for settlement of the controversies. MARS RULES EUROPE TT IS depressing to note the general tone of despair and helplessness which infuses Europe as the newest armament race begins. Not a note of hope or leadership is sounded anywhere. Even Britain seems now to have surrendered. Captain Eden, who for months has been traveling about Europe to endeavor to manufacture a suitable formula for revival of the disarmament conference, has reported in despair to the British parliament. In effect he announced that disarmament is a dead issue, and Britain must look to her guns. Thus, it seems, ends the league of nations phase of world history. A great humanitarian ideal, put into practice at staggering cost in blood and wealth, has been sunk by the greed and hypocrisy of its founders. Distorted at its birth into an instrument of conquest and tyranny, it was relied upon by the victors to obtain the unjust fruits of victory. It was the agency of enforcement of the most unreal and disastrous peace treaty in history, which the sheer force of economic and national realities is now unraveling. Like the Holy Alliance it was based upon an essentially impractical view of Europe, and like the Holy Alliance it is gradually disappearing. Disarmament can come Only if the conditions which cause nations to fear each other can be eliminated The new armament race, says Walter Lippman, really began in 1932 when Japan scrapped her obligations under the league covenant, the Pacific treaties, and the Kellogg pacts. It received impetus, it might be added, when Hitler seized power in Germany a year ago and roused alarm in all the states which had profited by the peace treaty. It is just conceivable that the strains and tensions, of tie world might even now be eased by conciliation i A JINX PURSUES is no reason to su PPOse that these finding's ' -- Ten Years Ago -,, ?, 0f ° NfE - Fair «eId nosed out Mason City 15 to a e today " The play finail What was the full name of Hi Brook Farm experiment? V. K. Brook Farm was a communisti industrial and literary establish ment founded at West Roxburv Mass., in 1841 by George Ripley and other persons of socialistic tendencies. It was known as the iirook Farm institute of agriculture and education, and was composed of a stock company of nearly lO members, among the more important of whom were Charles A Dana, George William Curtis Margaret Fuller and Nathaniel Hawthorne. The farm failed in 1846 but it was important in intellectual results.. Does a coniferous tree grow all int-iii-^ f *ST winter? E. w. A coniferous tree is evergreen Roger Patton,' son of Mr. and Mrs. A BRITISH IDEA OF FAIR PLAY TODAY IN HISTORY Approximately 4,000 persons attended the and Sons ne Will Patton, Erickson, 406 Twenty-second street south " " where he drove to Notables Born This Date-- Andrew W. Mellon b * ** - f , ove o afternoon to attend to business With s an organization was ivicted S h ' m ba ° k ' and he was ^terwards cloud of smoke. parachute, dropped into l h e I t - « TM Very sincerely yours. .W. R. BOYD. v Vagrant Thoughts By LOU MALLOKY LUKE, Hampton. and spoke of it of the Commonwealth," the nation s «K ? U f,, ? u art to dust ret »rnest" so why bother about the steel vault. ..Can't forget that well deen down in the London Tower dungeon... Guess my bird wants to "Build a Little Home" (as Eddie CanZ h« = i-afn. Way , ho f tea TMgr up paper in his cage-..I'd rather oe able to eat a supper of fresh side meat potatoes with their skins on and milk gravy thTMn to have a million dollars in the bank and a played ou? SvSH J S;S I M?T ing at the picture of her Little Women . Wasn't VITV crazy about filling the reservoir after school. My idea of heaven is ten dollars worth of stamps all at once...HOW estranged from the world is a mountain peak.. .How i wish j could home m0 «. |^ my neighbor is "gainin"' a little on that woodpile Spring dressed in emerald silk... "i««... church. Pope Pius XI elevated Patrick JosepifHaycV archbishop of New York, and George WtlHam E j delem, archbishop of Chicago, in ceremonies at Borne, i _ One Minute Pulpit--The name of the Lord is simply because the leaves remain on the tree all winter. This does not mean the tree is active, producing food and growing all winter long. Conifers have a dormant period during the winter just as deciduous trees. What is the longest role In modern play? J. D. That of Elizabeth Barrett in The Barretts of Wimpole Street. Miss Cornell is on the stage three hours from the rise of the first curtain end! minut es' before the play ,. W1 'y ar e elephants smaller than they used to be in circuses? «* H. Karl Kae Knecht, editor of White Tops, says that circuses and zoos have not wanted large elephants of late years as they are too troublesome and require too much room. How thick and high are dikes which keep the water out of Holland? E. B. Many are raised 40 feet above high water mark, and are wide enough at the top for a general roadway or canal, or sometimes both. Some of these trace back to old Roman times. What dish is braira? M. E. It is a preparation of meat made from pig's head and ox-feet, cut up boiled, pickled and moulded. In England, the brawn of Wiltshire is celebrated and it is a famous dish in Canterbury. Was an ochre mine found in Vcr- moni in 1840? E. S. inls40 aft WaS SUnk ' n Chittendcn What president was called "The Napoleon of the Stump?" M. S. The title was frequently applied to William McKinley, who had a supposed resemblance to the Em- i peror Napoleon, and who during the ' Harrison campaign traveled more i than 16,000 miles, and in his own first campaign made more than 300 speeches. ; What is the present value of a i ?20 gold piece? w. S. ! The prcsrat value of a .S20 gold ' fee or pold c e r t i f i c a t e is S20. it i" contrary to law to be in possession jJ of either, as they have all been called in. What is empathy'.' n. W. The equivalent of the German Einfuhlung, which is difficult to translate. It is modeled on the word sympathy and used with special, but not exclusive, reference to aesthetic experience. The most obvious example is that of the actor ox- singer when he feels the part he is performing or reading or studying. Similarly with other works of art. One may, by a kind of introjectton, "feel oneself into" what one observes or contemplates. Was Katherine Mansfield, the writer, ever married? J. M. She was married to J. Middleton Wurry, with whom she had been associated in the publication of Rhythm, a literary review, How ninny acres docs a citv block cover? W. D. The size varies. In several large cities, it is 200 x 700 square feet, or equal to nearly 3'.', acres. How many use gas for cooking or illuminating in U. S." F. G. The Gas Age Record says gas companies have 17,000,000 customers. Do fingerprints change during the life of an individual? D. M. They do not. They may become obliterated through scars, but where visible they are always the same. Where do carrot seeds come from? M, B. The department of agriculture says most carrot seeds are produced in California. The following- companies specialize in carrot seeds: Standard Seed Farms, Stockton, Cal., Ferry-Morse Seed company P O. Box 648, Detroit, Mich AUNT HET By Robert Quillen ''It's easy to be happy in matrimony. You just make up your mind to quit vain -egrets and be cheerful with what you've got."

Get full access with a Free Trial

Start Free Trial

What members have found on this page