The Los Angeles Times from Los Angeles, California on July 8, 1948 · 2
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The Los Angeles Times from Los Angeles, California · 2

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Thursday, July 8, 1948
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2 Fort I THURSDAY. JULY 8, 943 LOS 3ngClCS CittlCg t Coroner to Quiz Harrison in Carole Landis Suicide ; Actor to Tell of Supper Party; Attorney Hints 'Sudden Shock' Actor Rex Harrison, friend and neighbor of Carole Landis, will make a deposition in Coroner Ben Brown's office at 2:30 p.m. today regarding his knowledge of the actress' suicide. The Coroner said Harrfeon the decision will depend upon re- -i!t Vw ,r,i u ,,-- suits of continued investigation. Ul be accompanied by his at-;CapU Fmmct Jon?s pf lhp West torney, Judd Downing, and has,!. Angeles detective bureau expressed his willingness to co-'held the case virtually closed and operate in seeking a solution for - said little if any furthA- investi- ..... v the puzzling tragedy. "It will be a sort of informal inquest," Brown, said. "I want to get every bit of information about this case that I can." Will Tell of Supper Shock Suggested A theory that the actress impulsively took the fatal potion as the result of a "sudden great shock," then changed her mind when it was too late was ad- Uarrison will he questioned jvanced yesterday by Atty. Jerry in.. the Coroner's office, prcsum-Giesler, "a friend of Miss Landis ably about his last meeting with 'and her counsel in her divorce Miss Landis for supper in her 'action against her fourth hus- West Los Angeles home Sunday jband. V. Horace Schmidlapp.! night. The actor, who left her at Nvealthy Xew York theatrical: 9 p.m., apparently was the last i producer. I person to see her alive. i "I think Carole suffered a i Meanwhile, R. J. Abernathy, 'sudden great shock, from which Coroner's toxicologist, com-! she did not recover sufficiently pleted tests on tissues of Miss j to undress and retire." Giesler Iandis' body and announced he ;?aid. When found dead by Harri- had found evidence that the son, the actress wore the white WATER FRONT BANS DRUNKS AND SMOKERS Smokers and imbibers will find a new ordinance restricting' their activities at I.os Angeles water front today. For the City Council's new dangerous-cargo ordinance goes into effect. It prohibits smoking in cargo holds of ships and in all transit sheds, docks and wharves except in specific spots designated by the Harbor Department and Fire Department. . It also prohibits "an apparently intoxicated or disorderly person from entering premises including ships where dangerous cargo is being handled or stored," including tankers. Fines can range to $."00. actress had been drinking some time prior to her death. Abernathy said he found five milligrams of Seconal per 100 grams of liver tissue and .12 alcohol. This amount of alcohol, he said, is close to the requirement for intoxication and was analyzed more than 24 hours after MLss Landis' body was found in the bathroom of her home Monday. 'Xombfr' of Tablet The Seconal is a substance I'sed in sleeping tablets. Aber- blouse, black-and-white skirt and sandals she had worn when she dined with him the previous evening, Giesler pointed out. He said that photographs of Miss Landis body showed her hand and arm in a position as if she were trying to rise. May Have Regretted "Perhaps," he added, "she regretted her impulsive action at the last moment and was going to get help so she could recover." At a late hour yesterday, it was learned, Miss Landis' rela- rtathy said the amount found injtives and attorneys had not been the tissue was the result of "a able to locate a will other than number" of tablets. " the one she signed June 22, Still in abeyance is a decision 1941, although her suicide note on . whether a formal inquest referred to a document to be wili be conducted. Brown said 'found "in the files." Attorney Denies Rumor of Fight Oyer Landis Will Carole Landis mother, Mrs. Clara Landis, understood to be the actress chief beneficiary under her last known, will, appeared perplexed yesterday when she left the late star's Brentwood home for a conference about the estate. But Jerry Giesler, Miss Landis' attorney in her recent divorce suit, denied rumors heard in New York that a court fight would ensue over the estate due to Mrs. Landis' reported insistence that she be named executor. "Mrs. Landis has not been at all adamant about who the executor should be," Atty. Giesler said. He indicated her probable preference would be for another member of her family. Two Xamed in 1941 He also noted that Bo C Roos, former business manager for the actress, and one of his aides, Charles E. Trezona Jr., are named executor and coexecutor, respectively, under a will the actress signed June 22. 1914, the List testament thus far discovered. Both Roos and Trezona are willing to defer to the family's wishes in any estate settlement, Giesler pointed out. Mrs. Eandis, her daughter, Mrs. Dorothy Ross of Long Beach; her son, Lawrence Ridste of San Bernardino, and her former husband, Alfred Ridste of Richmond, Carole's father, conferred with Atty. Giesler at his office yesterday about the estate. The father arrived lateyester-day from Richmond. Had there been any dispute among the four about the estate, Giesler surely would have known it, he pointed out. Settlement Drawn The film star's property settlement with her fourth husband, V. Horace Schmidlapp, New York theatrical producer, wlrfm she sued for divorce in Santa Monica last March 22, was final except for her signature, Giesler said. Schmidlapp already had I signed an agreement and Miss Landis had ratified it orally in conferences and had promised to visit Giesler's office Tuesday (the day before yesterday) to affix her signature. Meanwhile her death intervened. If no other will is discovered, it was said, the 1944 document must be filed within 30 days of the actress death in order to be valid. Mrs. Landis is understood to be the chief beneficiary under this will. Atty. Frank B. Belcher, who drew up the will, said no action to file it for probate will be taken until the family and attorneys have traveled even.- avenue of search for the hinted newer document. This may take a week or 10 daj-s, he said. Just how valuable the estate will be could not be definitely determined. It was believed it will be considerably less than $100,000. since most of her financial success came since the advent of high income tax i brackets. I Giesler, however, took little j. stock in reports that acute financial distress was a cause of Miss Landis' suicide. "I believe that if Carole had worried about money, she would have been found dead in bed," the attorney said. "When a person worries about finances they lie awake at night and the worry continues to mount until it seems almost insurmountable." Money from the house, which the actress-had arranged to sell, would have paid off all her bills with a considerable sum left jover, Giesler said. "She was very honorable about jpaj-ing her bills," he added. ' She had WTitten personally to her creditors, assuring them that 1 1 hey would be paid as soon as the sale of the house cleared : escrow. "With her Eagle-Lion contract for two films and another deal jto make pictures in England, 'she had a bright future ahead of iher." UNIONISTS DEFY INQUIRY INTO RED DOMINATION NEW YORK, July 7 (U.R) Three CIO union officials refused to state today whether or not they are Communists at a tumultuous hearing by a Congressional subcommittee into alleged Leftist domination of certain New York unions. The three witnesses, all officials of the United Retail. Wholesale and Department Store Union of America, defied the investigating body despite a warning by its chairman. Rep. Charles J. Kersten, (R), Wis., that it will press contempt proceedings. Following the same line as the Hollywood writers and directors at the House Un-Ameri-ran Activities Committee hearing1 in Washington last spring, Arthur Osman, union president, David Livingston, vice-president, and Mrs. Esther Letz, director of the wholesale department, told the committee that a query about their political affiliation was a violation of their constitutional rights. The hearing today was marked by ejection of Osman and Livingston from the committee room at the opening of the session and by "boos from the audience. Some 2.10 pickets from CIO unions marched around the Federal Courthouse chantinsr: "Boo Hartley, you can't bust our union." Rep. Fred Hartley (R) N.J., co-author of the Taft-Hartley Law, is one of the subcommittee members. He is chairman of the House Education and Labor Committee and he appointed the present subcommittee investigating charges that pro-Communist elements in New York department stre and oiher unions hold a dominating influence. Star's Family Knows of No Second Note Carole Landis' family does not expect to confront . Actor Rex Harrison with questions at Coroner Ben Brown's "informal inquest" into the film star's death today, but will proceed on the assumption that officials are conducting an investigation to the best of their ability. That is what Miss Landis brother, Lawrence Ridste of San Bernardino, clearly indicated last night when reached at the actress' Brentwood home. "No," said Ridste in reponse to a question, "I have not heard that there was any note left by Carole besides the one that was found." Another report had Keen that the family might demand to know if another note had been left and, if so, where it now is. Rites Not Yet Arranged, Arrangements for funeral services for Miss Landis last night had not been completed at the Wilshire Funeral Home, Santa Monica, where the star's body was taken after it had been released by the Coroner's office. Both the funeral home and Ridste confirmed this, but neither offered, comment as to the reason. It was presumed that arrangements were being held in abeyance pending completion of the inquiry by the Coroner. "If the Coroner wants a further police investigation, we will be glad to do our part," Capt. Francis Kearney, chief of the homicide squad, said. Otherwise, Kearney indicated, the investigation is officially closed so far as police are concerned, since the toxicological report and other evidence point clearly to suicide. Kearney said a homicide bureau handwriting expert Yester day compared writing on the actress final note and that on an envelope which had con-lained sedatives. The expert was quite convinced they were not written by the same person. Explains Reference However, he said, that only showed that a person who provided the sedatives had written instructions for their proper use and that there was little significance in the notation "Quick two hours" after the word "red," written on the envelope. "The red probably referred to the reddish capsule in which secanol ordinarily is enclosed and we are told that its action is quicker than nembutal, which apparently was referred to' by the notation 'yellow,' the ordinary nembutal capsule color," Kearney explained. "It apparently meant that the Seconal would take effect more quickly and that its effects would subside more quicklv, probablv in about two hours." Kearney said that he is convinced Capt. Emmet Jones of the West Los Angeles detective bureau had made a thorough investigation which established suicide but, of course, did not determine a motive. "If there were am' suspicion of foul pla" Kearney added, "then motive would be important, but since all evidence shows the death without doubt to be suicide, then the search for a motive is hardly a police matter." Durante Plays Straight Scene in Courtroom Imagine Jimmy Durante with u?t straight lines no jokes! That's what he was reciting for Superior. Judge Harold B. Landreth yesterday on the witness stand. Not only that he was objecting to exactly that kind of lines in a radio comedy script. The big-nosed comedian and Funnyman Garry Moore and Froducer Thil Cohan are defendants in a $10,000 breach-of-contract suit brought by Jack Douglas, radio writer. Douglas claims they fired him Oct. 11, 1946, after four weeks of work at $1250 a week, when his contract called for 13 weeks. Not Funny, They Say They claim he wrote a script that was not funny, refused to rewrite it and walked off the show. The document, submitted for judicial inspection, "sagged in the middle," they claimed. "I spent a whole day writing that." Moore quoted the $12.j0-a-week writer as saying. "We were having a heated discussion." Moore continued. "In the middle of it. Jack picked up his papers and walked out." Inspecting the disputed script, which never was used except in courtroom broadcast, Durante said: "Look at that!" He waved the paper. "It says 'John Charles leaves Thomas.' That's old in radio. And here we're going to Sioppy Joe's and I say, 'Just sloppy not Joe's.' " Objects to Construction Moore said Durante did not like the jokes, because they weren't funny but that he objected, himself, because of the construction of the script, which "didn't seem to go any place." There was no "action," he said, f " , r 4 . . y ? " ' It - ' ' I - , If J- j ;j i j h ; j 'V - - 1 Times Dhoto THERE I WAS It's an old story in aviation, but these fellows have some of the oldest air stories ever told. Left to right, they are Walter Cerny, Wolter Brookins and Dudley Steele. The latter, wearing false whiskers, was emcee at meet yesterday. r 1 i ill ( 1 . - - t Jimmy Durante though it was about the digging of the ranama Canal. Douglas usually objected to changes in his scripts, they said, and he had walked away in anger once before but returned hefore show time, in order to aid with last-miirtite changes. Used File Script "Sometimes a comedian doesn't like a script and he takes 'an old one from the file." Du- can't fix a new one, you use an old one. There's never any bad feelings about it." The week before "The Digging of the Panama Canal," they used a file script, he said. Moore described Douglas as "a top writer," but Durante said Douglas was not a top writer for him. "He couldn't write for me. But Garry said, 'I want him,' and I said, "Garry, if you want him, you got him.'" Rent Overcharge Suits Total $3663 Six suits to recover a total of $3663 in asserted rent over charges were filed in Federal court yesterday hy the Los Angeles office of the Housing Expediter against landlords. The suits also asked that the landlords be enjoined from further violations of the Rent Control Act. One Los Angeles tenant, a woman relief client with two dependents, was overcharged $137, according to the suit. , Blockade Run by Tony Martin Singer Tony Martin and his bride of two months, Cyd Cha-risse, actress and dancer, ran the Russian blockade of Berlin on their return flight from a six-week tour of Europe, the newly-weds said on arrival here last night aboard a TWA plane. The Hollywood couple, who were married May 15 in Santa Barbara, combined a honeymoon with business. Martin fulfilled an engagement at London's Palladium Theater, where British bobby-soxers nearly caused a traffic jam on opening night. Afier entertaining American troops in and around Berlin, the couple visited Paris and Switzerland hefore returning home. Dewey Finds Time for Round of Golf PAWLING, N.Y., July 7 U.R) Gov. Thomas E. Dewey played nine holes of golf today, his first day on the links since' his nomination as Republican Presidential candidate. Dewey said he shot a "pretty good" game. He spent the morning working on State appointments and drove to the Pawling golf course in the afternoon. Trio Arrested as Conscience of One Reacts Illustrated on Pag 3. Part I A man's guilty conscience yesterday led to his arrest and that of two women on suspicion of burglary. District Attorney's Office Investigators Jimmy Lyons and Russell Black said the 29-year-old Hollywood hairdresser, Lincoln Isted, 29, came to their office yesterday and told them, "My conscience bothers me." Isted, the officers said, then implicated two women, who rented, a basement apartment from him at fiS59 Yeager Place, in a series of thefts from hillside homes in Hollywood under construction or nearing completion. The women are Michell Montaigne, 27, and Kimberly Towers, 25. Cats Provide Worry Hollywood detectives entered the case when two three-foot high blue va.s valued at $1500 were identified as having been taken from a Hollywood home. Detectives said they had found more than S1000 in tile, window sashes, lumber, draperies, carpeting and building supplies in a garage under the house. Lyons related that Isted admitted becoming disturbed when he began to get a "kick" out of stealing. He then gave himself up to the investigators, they said. The two women became hysterical when they discovered they would have to go to jail. They -were more concerned over the fate of their nine pet cats than themselves and wept when told their pets probably would have to be turned over to the Humane Officer. All three, detectives said, were booked on suspicion of bur glary. Overell, Kin of Yacht Blast Victim, Dies Oscar M. Overell, 54, brother of Walter E. Overell, who died with his wife in a Newport Harbor yacht blast March 15, 1947, was found dead in a friend's home near Zuma Beach yesterday, Sheriff's deputies reported. Overell was a house guest at the home of Frank Kasole of 289SI W Cliffside Drive. He had been under treatment for a heart ailment and following a preliminary investigation death was attributed to a heart attack, officers at Malibu Sheriff's Substation said. He leaves a daughter, Mrs. Orman McCartney Jr.; a grandson and a brother, Ira Overell, all of Los Angeles. Funeral ar rangements are pending. Broker to Wed Radio Actress Florence Prichett, 28, radio ac' tress and former wife of Richard Canning, will be married next Monday in Santa Barbara to Earl E. T. Smith, 44, New York stock broker. Smith once was the husband of Consuela Vander- bilt. The ceremony will take place at the home of the John de Wacks, with Mrs. Jeffrey Lynn, wife of the screen actor, as ma tron of honor. A supper party will precede a honeymoon in rebble Beach. The couple will reside in New lork. Veteran Pilots Gather for Some 'Hangar Flying' They were "hangar flying" yesterday on the ninth floor of the Chamber of Commerce Building. A bunch of the "old drivers" talking about bygone days not exactly in a bull session, but in a more dignified way as speakers before the Chamber's Old Timers' luncheon. The stories spanned back as far as the Wright Brothers, with Walter Brookins telling how he saw Wilbur Wright testing some of his theories with a box kite in 1899 before the first plane ever flew. Taught by Wrights Brookins was taught to fly by the Wrights in 1909, soloed in two and a half hours and was immediately put in charge of a pilots' school at Montgomery, Ala. Among students he later took into the air was Gen. H. H. (Hap) Arnold, now retired chief of the Air Force. Steve Stimpson of United Air Lines, credited with putting stewardesses into airlines, told of the girls flying for Boeing Air Transport in 1929. "They really worked in those days." he said. "Why they punched tickets, handled baggage and even adjusted the altimeter at each landing." Jimmie James, Western Air Lines veteran, defended the so-called "old crates." "Thev were just as safe as the ships of to day," he said, "just more limited. I wouldn't be at all nervous riding behind a Liberty engine today even if it was designed for World War I." Emcee With Whiskers Wearing false whiskers and sitting in a wheel chair, Dudley Steele, former manager of Lockheed Air Terminal, served as master of ceremonies and opened the session with an account of a cross-country flight "in which we made no less than 21 forced landings." Tom McMahon, Douglas Air craft executive, confessed how in 1920 he argued for two hours at tempting to persuade Donald Douglas not to come to Southern California and start an aircraft business. "I told him it would never work out," he grinned. Others Present There were others, too: Hred Kelly, who flew Western Air's first mail and passenger runs with James; -Walter Cerny, direc tor of engineering for Northrop, who told of the early days not too long Ego of the Flying Wing experiments, and Gene May, gray-haired Douglas test pilot, who has been flying the company's record-breaking Sky-streak monoplane at Muroc. But some unidentified guest had the last word: "It looks like aviation is here to stay." Body of Girl, 3, Seized by Bear, Found Dead in Woods by Posse ST. IGNACE, Mich., July 7 (U.R) A 200-pound black bear seized a 3-year-old girl from the steps of her home today and carried the girl off into dense woods as her mother watched, State police said. The body of the girl, Carol Ann Pomeranky, was found by a posse which tracked down and shot the bear. The girl's mother, wife of a ranger in the Marquette Nation al Forest, said she was working in the kitchen today when she saw the bear. She said the animal seized the screaming child and stalked off. Mrs.' Pomeranky said she seized a broom and screamed as she chased the bear, but woods halted her rescue attempt. She telephoned her husband Arthur at a ranger station 15 miles away, and the posse organized. - , , i 1 . - IS' ' It I' - A , - 2fi yjr. v v s -1 i Prize .Snapshot 1 Contest to Get Gun Tomorrow Cameras, start clicking! With the chance to win 3 much as $1500 for a single picture, the National Awards Ama; teur Snapshot Contest gets under way tomorrow. ' So a little thought and fore sight at this- time may bring you big dividends later for the snapshots you take from now until Aug. 27 can be entered in the contest. Besides the pictures you tak now, all pictures you have taken' since the first of the year are eligible to participate for, tha awards. The Los Angeles Times-con ducted contest will run for seven weeks. Each week will be a sep arate contest and there will be eight weekly cash awards. At the conclusion all the winning entries will vie for the four grand prizes. Chance at $10,000 These winning pictures will qualify for a chance at the $10,-000 being offered in . national awards. You may win more than $1500 with a single snapshot. Remember when taking pic tures that there are a few esf sentials that should be kept in mind. Pictures entered in this big money contest will not bs judged -primarilly on photogra phic technique but on general interest and appeal. ' For example, there are two basic types of pictures, among those most frequently taken by amateur photographers: "firing squad" poses and pictures which. telr a story. Both types have their good points. Firing squad pictures, m which everyone is looking straight at the camera are good record pictures. They show what people look like and pre serve a record of the scene. More Attractive Storytelling pictures, on the ether hand, while showing tha subject clearly invariably are more pleasing and attractive. A storytelling picture is ona that shows something happening, and it's also usually one that doesn't look as if it obviously posed for the camera. - - . . .. For this reason planning Js very important in picture taking. So start planning your-Vacation picture taking now. Arid plan to enter . these arid ' '.the snaps you've taken all year" ia the Los Angeles Times Photo Contest which starts tomorrow, and will conjinue with; weekly-prizes until tAug. 27. Following are the contest rules: - - - ,-: ' SNAPSHOT CONTEST KITLES 1 The contest is strictly for amateurs. Anyone is eligible except employees of th Los Angeles Times and their families, and individuals or members of families en-eaed in the manufacture, sale, -commercial, finishing or professional usa of photographic goods. 2 Entrants may submit as many black and white pictures as desired at any tira during the period of the contest. Color pictures are not eligible. . 3 Pictures must have been made after Jan. 1. 1948. . 4 Your snapshots may b made on an typa of film, but must not be made on glass-plate negatives. Any make of camera, film, paper or chemicals may be used. Developing and printing may be done by a photo finisher or the entrant. No print or enlargement more than 10 inches in the longest dimension will ba accepted.-No art work or retouching is permitted on prints or the negatives from which, they are made. No composite pictures, such as multiple printing or montages permitted. Pictures should not be mounted or framed. 5 AU pictures shall be Judged solely on general interest or appeal. Photographio excellence or technique, while important, will not be the deciding factor in determining prize winners. The decision of the judges shall be accepted as final. 6 Before being eligible for the national awards in one or more of the four classifications, the entrant must submit the original negative with print 'and sign a. statement that his picture or a closeW similar picture of the same subject or situation has not been and will not b entered by him in any other snapshot contest or salon, and has not been and will not be offered for publication in any manner. 7 To enter the contest, mail a print or prints -of as many pictures as you desire to "Amateur Snapshot Contest Editor" of the Los Angeles Times, or deposit in .box in main lobby Times Building. On the back of each picture print your name and address clearly in ink and the class in which you wish your picture entered. (See classifications). 8 No prints will be returned. Do no submit negatives witn your prints. Keen them until requested by the Amateur Snapshot Contest Editor. (Only original negatives accepted). This newspaper assume no responsibility for negatives. 9 Each week the Los Angeles Timeg will pay $10 to the winner in each of the four classifications and S2.50 to the second place in each division. In. addition at the elose of the contest The Time will award a grand prise of $25 to each of the four pictures chosen by the Timea judges the best entered in its contest. The final winners will be entered in a national contest where they will compete with th same number of entries from other news. paP.eJfor P"zes totaling $10,000. IMPORTANT: If you snap a picture which you expect to enter in the contest and in which a person or persons appear, be sur you get their names and addresses. This is necessary because before your pictures can become eligible for the national award the written consent of such person or persons to the use of the obtained ,dver"6uis Purposes mus bi ..Ki101"' r uthe classifications in hlfh.p5lze? Wl1' be awarded weekly and in the final contest: CLASS A: CHILDREN AND BABIESt Any picture In which the principal in. UrARt.J child or children mfc ""V m mCTSASS : YOCNG PEOPLE AND AD. .: ne or more grownups (high school age. or olden engaged in i any activity: in sports, games, hobbies, at home! or on a holiday, indoor and out! CLASS C: SCENES AXD STILL LIFE: n?,5capeV "'""ne views, street scenes. RKhi;e? flowers; flt. art curios or ri a sP n or .".yU1,". arrangements. CLASS D: AM.MAL LIFE; Household pets, -horses, farm animals, forest wild life, pictures at zoos, either indoor or out ENTRY The Times-sponsored Amoteur Snapshot Contest gets under way tomorrow, to run for seven, weeks with eight weekly awards. This photograph, for instance, could be entered in the Young People ond Adults Class one of the four photo classifications in the contest. Educators Will Confer Tomorrow School administrators of this area will hold an all-day conference tomorrow in Hancock Auditorium at SC. The session will begin at 10 a.m. There will be two other conclaves on succeeding Fridays. Speakers tomorrow include: Dr. Edgar E. Fuller, New Hampshire Commissioner, of t Educa. tiqn, who will talk on "The Public Schools and Separation of State and Church;" Dr. Millare D. Rell, Superintendent of Schools, Wilmette,' 111.; Dr. John A. Sexson, California Association or scnooi Administrators Dr. George D. Straver Jr diana University. and In- 1

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