The Los Angeles Times from Los Angeles, California on November 8, 1944 · 2
Get access to this page with a Free Trial

A Publisher Extra Newspaper

The Los Angeles Times from Los Angeles, California · 2

Publication:
Location:
Los Angeles, California
Issue Date:
Wednesday, November 8, 1944
Page:
2
Start Free Trial
Cancel

A WEDNESDAY, NOV. 8, 1944 ROOSEVELT WINS PRESIDENTIAL RACE Lead Over Republican Opponent Mounts; Dewey High Command Refuses to Concede Continued trom First rage ward continued control of the tfeaty-ratifying Senate. They were assured of at least eight of me ij seats tney needed. . The eight, elected were Majority Leader Barkley of Kentucky, Tydings of Maryland and six from the Solid South. Republicans elected to the Senate included Aiken of Vermont, Morse of Oregon and Reed of Kansas. Senator Nye, North Dakota, Republican, was running second in a three-way race. Democratic Gains . Eight Republican places tumbled Into the Democratic basket, Including the seat of Rep. Hamilton Fish, New Yorker unloved by either .Roosevelt or Dewey. As matters stood at 2 a.m., the Democrats had definitely elected 101 and the Republicans 13 toward a total House membership of 435. The great majority, of the contests were still undecided. New York, home State of both Presidential candidates, seesawed during the night but then Roosevelt went into the lead. ' New York Seesaws ', Michigan, which gave the Republican ticket a slender 7000-vote- margin four years ago, turned over a heavy out-State vote to Dewey. But it looked like i photo finish again when Detroit's vo t e s began . coming through. . , Maine came through for Dew-ey, definitely putting her five electoral votes in his column, as she did for the Republican tick-e.t four years ago. Mr. Roosevelt was In the van In such vote-weighty States as Pennsylvania, Illinois and California. Philadelphia apparently hung up a Roosevelt victory, but by a narrower margin than four years ago, and the President rwung out front early in Pennsylvania as a whole. . Early Chicago Returns The early returns from Illinois showed Roosevelt ahead in that key State, but they were mostly from the Chicago precincts where that outcome was to be anticipated. Doanstate, Dewey was leading. The Republican nominee set the early pace In Ohio, home State of his running mate, Gov. John V. Brlcker. The greater part of the initial counts came from the rural districts where Dewey and Brlcker looked for their heaviest backing. '"" . Dewey also led in Michigan, New Jersey and Indiana. , Maryland, a border State, txirned out a heavy Roosevelt majority in' Baltimore that it was apparent only a Republican landslide elsewhere could over-' come. . Massachusetts was on the Democratic side. The South, despite Its substantial support for Roosevelt, nevertheless provided echoes of Insurgencies against the New Deal. In Texas and South' Carolina ballots for anti-Roosevelt Democratic slate cut into the Chief Executive's total, but not enough to threaten his chances. Early Dewry Gains Dewey had picked up early advantages in Kansas, Maine, South Dakota and Vermont all carried by Republican Wendell Willkle four years ago. And, In aa election in which some of the forecasters had figured the soldier vote could be the decisive factor. Dewey moved to the front in Ocean County, New Jersey the first to complete Its count of service ballots. It was a Republican county in 1940. and Dewey car-rled it 768 to 683. Offsetting the Dewey margin there, to borne extent, was an eoge given to President Roosevelt when the computation of soldier votes was partially complete in Hunterdon County, New Jersey. That, too, was G.O.P. four years ago. " Big City Showings ' - The tabulations there underscored the Importance of big city votes, - on " which Democrats leaned for picking up pluralities. Heavy turnouts of voters had been reported from most metropolitan areas, where men and women passed through voting booths in some Instances at a clip of one a minute. with an eye out tor returns from those areas that might show definitely the way the 1911 political winds were blowing. President Roosevelt kept his own election tables up to date at his home at Hyde Park, N.Y. Dewey received the returns in his apartment in a New York City hotel. Early returns on the contest between the two of them were significant for one big reason; Record Vote 8een The total vote In the nation appeared likely to roll past the 60,000,000 mark. The previous high was 49,815,312 in 1940, and most advance forecasts had been jhat the record would stand. 4 But this year America's balloting millions were supplying the all-important decision in the first wartime Presidential election in 80 years. They were picking between Roosevelt, the 62-ear-old three-termer, and Twey, the 42-year-old New 1'orlc Governor, to lead them to Victory over a ruthles3 Axis and j LOS 3ngClC8 Cf mCS to guide them through the first turbulent years of peace. With that grave responsibility on them,.tley began Jamming into election booths before sunup. Reports from all over the country indicated that they kept coming through the day as they never had before. P,olnt after point reported heavy or even "extremely heavy" balloting. Many said it was running ahead of 1940, and many predicted the biggest vote in history. And that despite snow in New Hampshire and rain In many areas from the Mississippi Valley westward. The two top men in yester day's political windup cast their ballots shortly after noon, East em War. Time. The men in the running-mate spots on the na tional tickets had voted earlier. The wives of all the top-flight candidates went along with their husbands. In. Kansas City, election officials had to send extra ballot boxes to 24 polls to take care of the flood of votes. First Full Return First In with a complete re turn was Nutbush Precinct in Vance County, North Carolina, where all the 21 eligible voters had their ballots in by 10 a.m. and all for Roosevelt. Four years ago there were 24 votes all for Roosevelt. But U didn't mean much four years ago or now. For nobody expected North Carolina to do much for a Republican candidate. Abroad, millions of people watched the democratic processes at work in America -and wondered what the results would be. The war took second place behind the American elec tlon in London newspapers most of which predicted a Roosevelt victory. Congress Contests It was an election, too, to determine the political complexion of more than a third of the United States Senate where Just one more than a third of the members can block a treaty. So Europe and the world hd an interest in Congressional contests, too. Of the 35 Senate seats at stake. 22 are held by Democrats. 13 by Republicans. To retain control of the Senate the Democrats nocflod to win only 13 of the races and only six outside the South, since seven Dixie Democrats were up for re-election. The Republicans, who gave themselves a fighting chance, had to snare 25 -of the 35 seats at issue. Different in House It was a different picture in the House, where 432 Congressmen were being picked to sit with three Republican Incumbents re-elected in Maine last September. The Democrats now hae 214 House members, the Republicans 212, and 21S is a majority.. Thus the G.O.P. would have to retain its present membership and add half a dozen newcomers to get a mathematical edge. And the Democrats need four more seats, plus all they have now, to stay in control. HOW CONGRESS RACES STAND Continued from First Fage for the 6eat now held by Democrat Bennett C. Clark in Missouri, and Republican H. Alexander Smith outdistanced Elmer H. Wene in New Jersey with returns incomplete. Other Turnovers Augustus W. Bennett. (D.) of Newburgh defeated Hamilton Fish. Other turnovers in favor of the Democrats retired Daniel Ellison (R.) Md.;. William J. Miller (R,) Ct, and Thomas B. Miller (R.) Pa. , The Democrats also picked up seats In the First. Second, Fifth and Sixth Pennsylvania districts. At 2 a.m. (E.W.T.) the Demo-crats had been assured of 101 seats in the House, where they now have 214 members- to 212 Republicans The Republicans had elected 13 members. Most of the seats assured the Demo crats in the early returns were in the Solid South. "I believe in the will of the majority, cast in the American way." Rep. Fish said at his headquarters in Newburgh. Bennett is a lifelong Republican who ran on the Democratic. American Labor, Liberal and Good Government tickets after Fish had defeated him in the primary for the Republican nominations. He, too, issued a statement in which he. said his first reaction was "one of gratifl. cation at the outcome of the long and 'hard battle." Roosevelt, Okla., Votes for F. D. R. ROOSEVELT (Okla.) Nov. 8. (;P) This small community In Southwest Oklahoma bearing the name of President Roosevelt gave 'its support for a fourth term by a majority of 62 votes. An unofficial tabulation gave Roosevelt 148 vote3 and Thomas E. Dewey 86. President Looks to Fourth Term; Thanks Dewey HYDE FARK ,N.Y.) Nov. 8, (JP) President Roosevelt, who early today wired his thanksto Gov. Thomas Dewey for coneed ing the election, told torch- bearing Hyde Park neighbors, "It looks very much life 111 have to be coming up here on the train from Washington for another four years." - Presidential Secretary Stephen Early, who made public - the President's telegram to Gov, Dewey, told rcporters the President had received no direct' roes-sage from Dewey, but had heard the latter's radio statement. Early, talking to reporters from the Roosevelt borne, said: "There are two things I want to call to your attention: first, we heard over the air that he (President Roosevelt), was asleep. The President has remained at his work table throughout the evening and is still there. You also heard Gov. Dewey's statement over the air. No telegram from the Governor or other- message than his radio remarks which the President heard has been received at the President's home at this hour. Rends Wire of Thanks "The President, however, having heard Gov. Dewey, has dispatched the following telegram: "'His Excellency, Thomas E. Dewey, Governor of New York, Roosevelt Hotel. New York, N.Y.: "'I thank you for your statement which. I have heard over the air a few minutes ago. "'(Signed) Franklin D. Roosevelt.' " Mr. Roosevelt sat through .the long election night carefully tabulating the returns as they came to him over a battery of telephone lines and news wires. Long before Gov. Dewey conceded defeat, however, the Chief Executive apparently felt confident that he had been returned to the White House for another four years. Talks to Taraders Appearing on the portico of his home to greet the Hyde Park torchlight paraders before mid-nljfht the President said: "The reports coming In .are not so bad and I can't concede anything yet. "It looks very much like 1 11 have to be coming up here on the train from Washington for another four years." The President came out on the poifh of his'hnmp, wearing the brown hat and navy cape that accompanied htm through alt of bis fourth-term campaign. He smiled broadly while his neighbors sang "We Love Our President." A fife and bugle corps- played "Hail, Hail, the Gang's All Here." Refers to Ham Fish Mr. Roosevelt, speaking of Rep. Hamilton Fish (R.) N.Y., who was defeated in bis re-election bid, said, "As I said yester day, there's more than one way to get rid of a. Congressman." By a recent redisricting Fish no longer would have represent ed Dutchess County after Jan. 1. The Chief Executive Identi fying himself to the registration clerk as a Dutchess County tree grower" cast Ballot 251 today at the Hyde Park Town Hall where he made his first po-litical speech in 1910. How Cities President U.S. Senator . . Proposition 11 Proposition 12 Do way 8oo.ar.lt Housor Downs y Ys No Y No Alhambra 3,549 4,402 . 3,531 2,631 Arcadia 3,433 2,151 3,536 1,826 160 421 316 180 Azusa 585 " 512 492 300 209 575 433 344 Baldwin Pafk .. 479 682 ;505. '584 . 58 108 114 ' 176 Bell 237 . 599 249 513 264 312 198 507 Bellflower 155 270 . 133 2p8 Beverly Hills ... '. 1.498 ' 923- 941 ' 442 ' ' ' 54 ."457 359 ' 126 Burbank 1,174 1,542 1,220 1.362 ' 569- -735" ' 864 1,459 Catalina Island .. 239 363 40 100 . 62 64 iClearwater 146 215 176' 192 Compton .. 2.053. " 4,108 2,224 ' 3,524 ' .151 278 128 ' 290 Covina ., 592' 339 ' 566 329 ' 77 216 164' ' 123 Culver City ..... 6,695 10,103 5,122' 6.870 ' I Downev 431 442 384 ' 374 " 209 32S ' 195 333 El Monte 2,153 3,715 1,548 2,404 243 473.'. 265 468 El Segundo 109 164 SI' 111 21 37 : 38 19 Gardena 947 1,858 - 1,100 ' 1,839 135 1 195 107 , 225 Glendale 6,380 4,666 ' 4.529 ' 2,947 81 285 ' " 208 167 Glendora 968 "519" 904 417 178 338.' 208 193 Hawthorne 2,774 . 5,845 2,773 4,941 ' 988 1,935 ..' 1,151 2,672 Hermosa 638 676' 551 415 . . 679 1,026 580 780 Huntington Park 2,340 3.816 2,243 . 2.955 , 256 . 483 252 472 Inglewood 4,675 6,354 ' 4.206 " 4,862 846 - 2,468 1,466 1885 La Crescenta . . 161 . 217 168 . 194 77 98 126 . 238 La Canada 1,615 ' '739 : 1,697 ' ' ' 609 39 282 ; 239 59 Lancaster 191 121 170 115 " Long Beach 5,595 ' . 6.765 5,015 5,261 Lynwood 247 . 718 33.T . 625 Manhaitan 680 712 618"" 665 188 312 ' ' 320.' 114 May.wood 505 . .1,073 559' 952 96 : 143 56 159 Monrovia 2,031 '. 1,067. 1.521';. .820 Montebello 154 234 152 231 89 232'" 107 231 Monterey Park .. 495 848 352 . 744 ; 409 951 391 . 855 Montrose 171 . 189 175 174 S3" 253' 148 ' 194 North Hollywood 2,377 . 3,002 1,986 ' 2,244 . 605 , 2,330". 1,324 1,806 Norwalk 172.. 269 , 178" 251 " .. . Pasadena 9,806 -. 7,317 ' " 9,547 ! 4,351 , 324 '' 1.082 741 657 Palos Verdes .... 325 .134 ' 320 " 121 IS ' , 271 ' ' 233 . 60 Pomona 4,498." 3,595 3,929" ; 2,513 790 - 1,772'"' 1,408 1,003 Puente 37 , . 13 ' 34 " 11 " 5 ' 40 , ' 25 20 Redondo 1,966 s, 2.611 ' 1,744 " 2,118 414 589 517 492 San Fernando .. . 1,530 " 2.077 1,614 1,896 San Gabriel 3,052 3.564 2.938 ' 2,691 135" 404 : - 265 ' 276 San Pedro 1.686 3.953 1,279 2,437. 193 ' 432 " 242 431 South Gate 1,875 2.139 " ' 1,275 1.500 678 818 563 1.237 Santa Monica .. 8,564 8,063 7,195.' 5,336 . 632 . 1,526 " j 1,255 " 1,320, South Pasadena- "' ' San Marino... 3.456 1.252 3,399 917 Torrance 2,025 3,729 618 ". 1,369 119 ' 270" 170 223! Van Nuys-Canoga " " j Park.". 1,265 1.217 1,076 1,032 280 816.-' '465 628; Vernon 62 ' ' 161 60 " 149 100 ": 96"'" 65 144; Whittier 1,524 ' ' 888 ' l,54.f - 741 358 ' ' 1,028' :" 879 438 West Covina 181' "100 178 92 - Wilmington ..:.. 1,522 "-' 3,848' " 1,378 "' 2,224 35S'"' : ' 509:--: ' ' 208 712 California Presidential Returns by Counties , Compiled by U Total Pets. 1.487 5 25 132 34 27 275 ' 45 260 34 122 85 32 309 65 32 47 5,572 43 136 21 88 80 23 131 61 42 263 65 County. Alameda-Alpine ..... Amador Butte ... ,r. . Calaveras .. Colusa ..... Contra Costa El Dorado. Fresno Glenn Humboldt .. Imperial Inyo Kern ....... Kings ...... Lake ....... Lassen Los Angeles Madera Marin. .:. . ; . . Mariposa . . . Mendocino . Merced Modoc Monterey ... Napa Nevada ..... Orange Placer '. Plumas 30 Riverside ..' 177 Sacramento . . . . , 330 San Benito 29 San Bernardino . . ; 365 San Diego . .... v. 752 San Francisco 1,181 San Joaquin 247 90 San Luis Obispo San Mateo 303 Santa Barbara 132 374 110 61 13 75 136 Santa Clara . Santa Cruz ...... A ..... Shasta .... Sierra Siskiyou ......... Solano Sonoma 181 Stanislaus Sutter Tehama .. Trinity ... Tulare ... Tuolumne Ventura .. Yolo Yuba ..... 146 39 55 21 154 48 135 52 38 Total 14.850 FIRST LADY EMOTIONS OYER RETURNS HYDE PARK (N.Y.) Nov. 7. &) Mrs. Roosevelt listened to the election returns tonight confident, she said, that "whatever the people decide will be the best for the nation." . As the polls closed on her husband's bid for a fourth term in the White House the First Lady said ' We've been -through so many campaigns that one really Just wait? for the results,, with, confidence that" whatever the people decide will be for the good of the nation." Mrs. Roosevelt said she had no emotional reactions to the outcome of today's election. . I'neventfol Day "I've been passing a perfectly uneventful day, doing absolutely nothirg this afternoon," ahe added. She Invited reporters to the Hype Park mansion late tonight, promising "something to eat-not much, but something," while they listened to election results. Her guests for tonight were Frederick Delano, the Presi dent's uncle; Miss Laura Delano, his cousin both of whom , live near the Roosevelt estate Ger ald Morgan, a Hyde Park vil lager, and Maj. Henry S. Hooker of New York., the President's in L.A. County Voted Associated Prou Pets. Xoportina 1,272 5 24 18 15 15 42 15 173 79 47 . 7 60 8 19 9 -.. , 4,633 '7 1V ; :. 6 . ', '.13- r 19 . 5 - 56 V ' ; l , , 12 -33 '- 2 V. , 70 SO 17' 296 17 1,179 53 15 136 73 41 -30 18 8 31 7 " 71 103 26 " 13 18 84 16 57 " 11 . 30 9.124 BoosotsH 78,716"" 34 1,668'. 408 37.7 -924 3.839 842 17.645 811 4,028 2,083 1.137 . 2.981 217 . 592 ' -.' . 520 526,018 , ; . 81 . 618 601 1,040 J.289 ' 508 4,583 '.'48 ' 580 .,' 3,015 .' 19 : 543 1.576 8.469 820 33,118 1,257 192.207 4.489 3,311 4.580 6.353 3.987 1.877 762 173 . 1,473 ' . 488 5.320 7,095 1.317' 755 617 6.478 409 5,408 944 1,803 Dowsy 57,956 : 73 1,034 371 274 . 830 2.145 571 10,947 915 " 3.011 2,367 1,145 2,387 -. 170, ' 717 299 403,211 51 452 439 1,213 1.O40 245 . 4,045 46 490 4,399 10 272 2,122 3,934 948 29.5.V 812 124,456 4.124 2,460 6.263 5,594 2,541 2,417 477 180 1.359 385 5,615 6.533 1,315 622 458 6,662 273 3,434 564 3,443 950.847 715.745 DENIES ANY former law partner and lifelong friend. Mrs. Roosevelt talked to newspaperwomen by telephone today after the had gone torthe Hyde Park Town Hall to vote with the President. ' Riding in the Presidential car was large black dog instead of the familiar Fala, the President s pet Scotty. ' " ' One of the newspaperwomen askea if the large black dog. a Lawauor retriever, was a com petitor of Fala in the President's affections. "No,- the dog really belongs to young Curtis," she said, referring to the 14-year-old son of her daughter, Mrs. John Boettiger. New York Soldier Votes Favor Roosevelt Chief o Tribune PrM B.rle. NEW YORK. Nov. 7. Soldier votes in two of Manhattan's Assembly districts had Roosevelt leading. 307 to 50, for Dewey with returns incomplete. In the Fourth Assembly District, in five election districts, Roosevelt led 283 to 37 for Dewey. In one election district, the 14th, of the Second Assembly District, Roosevelt led Dewey, 24 to 13. Dewey Concedes F.D.R. Election; Thanks Backers NEW YORK. Nov. 8. (JP) Gov,' Thomas E- Dewey told a pre?s conference at 3:15 a.m. that "it's clear thet Mr. Roosevelt has been re-elected for a fourth term." In a brief f address carried by all radio networks, the Republi can Presidential nominee said he was grateful for the -support he had received and declared that the Republican party "emerges 4 revitalized from this campaign." " : ' "I am confident ,tjiat all Americans wilt'Join tn? in the hope that divine providence will guide and protect the President of the United States." Dewey smiled for a battery of cameramen as he pronounced his 1944 political swan song. - 'Statement Read - With more than 300 newsmen, photographers and employees of the" Republican National Committee clustered about him in the main ballroom of the Roosevelt Hotel, Dewey sat down smilingly before a battery of microphones, calmly . placed a typewritten statement in front of him and began to read it. Mrs. Dewey, who accompanied him to the ballroom, smiled as she came in striding alongside her husband. She took a place in the background as the New York Governor went to the microphone. After he had made his short statement over the radio, Dewey repeated it for the benefit of the newsreel photographers and reporters who wished to obtain the full text. Crowd Applauds The Deweys, who had made no public appearance since a dinner party earlier in the evening, came downstairs accompanied ty aides and walked in to the ballroom. There was applause from those who gathered around them, both when they appeared and after Dewey had completed the rereading of his statement Some employees of the National Committee walked away during the interim, wiping their eyes. "It's clear that Mr. Roosevelt has been re-elected for a fourth term," Dewey said at the outset "I extend to President Roosevelt my hearty congratulations and my earnest hope that his next term will bring a speedy peace and we will re-establish tranquillity among our people. Thanks Expressed I am deeply grateful for the confidence expressed by so many millions of my fellow citizens and their labors." Dewey reread his valedictory slowly for the benefit of those who had waited up for his decl-sion on the returns which by that time were beginning to engulf him. Dewey told reporters that he had been Informed by news reports that President Roosevelt had retired by midnight and as a consequence he had not sent the President any message of congratulation. . "I understand the President has gone to bed so I have to do it this way," Dewey said, motioning to the battery of micro phones. Earlier Herbert Brownell Jr., said in a radio broadcast- that "no definite conclusion" could be drawn from the election re turns up to that time (1:30 a.m.) Fighting Campaign Brownell said Dewey and his running mate. Gov. John W. Bricker, had made a "courageous, fighting campaign" and that they had "strengthened and united America" in its war effort He asserted also that they had lifted peace' discussions "above partisanships." Receiving the returns with Gov. Dewey were Mrs. Dewey, Brownell and Mrs. Brownell, El liott V. Bell, one of his chief campaign 'advisers, and Mrs. Bell. "'In a brief speech to 1 party workers, the candidate declared that "whatever the outcome, I think we have made a fighting contribution toward the unity of Our country, toward the war.ef-f6rt and the peace to come." Earlier the Governor and Mrs. Dewey had cast their ballots in an" E. 48th St. polling place. Go to Head of Line Despite his protestations that he had "nothing to do I can wait all day," the Deweys were ushered through an applauding crowd to the head of the line. Miss Josephine Hughes, pert brunette advertising director for Hattie Carnegie, Inc., who would have been next, said she was "thrilled to death'' to give 'way. Votes Cast After 7 p.m.; Precincts Out Don't look now, but there were some Los Angeles voters who voted last night after the polls were "closed." Reason: A number of polling places ran out of ballots! ; As the heavy voting continued near the 7 p.m. deadline, workers in precincts in scattered sections of the city began swamping the Registrar of Voters' headquarters with requests for more ballots. -Although they were rushed but to the polls by Sheriff's cars Vote on U.S. Senator Tabulated by Counties CorapUod by (ho Associated Pro Total ' Pets. - " County " "Pets. Reporting; - Dowmoy Housor Alameda 1,487 - 1,272 55,818 " " 4f,259 Alpine '5 5 28 76 Amador 25 21 . . 1,112 -' 1,002 Butte .132 18. . '. ..378.' .... 354 Calaveras 34 - 15 283 301 Colusa .. 27 " 15 - 724 871 Contra Costa 275 85 4.566 3.141 El Dorado 45 15 ' 725 . 603 Fresno 260 173 14,283 10,078 Glenn ....... 34' 12 ' 715 . " 912 Humboldt 122 79 3,307 2,947 Imperial 85 47 - 1,810 2,222 Inyo ..: 32 5 47 71 Kern 309 60 " 2,024 , 2,124 Kings 65 ' ' 8 194 '162 Lake 32 .19 513 ' 669 Lassen 47 9 " 426 . 345 Los Angeles 5,572 4,633 , 390,952 357,627 Madera 43 1 66 45 Marin 136 ' 1 42 4 29 Mariposa 22 '. 13 544 ' 478 Mendocino .. ,88 19 .839 1,244 Merced , 80 19 . 1.249 . 1,013 Monterey 131 56 3,832 3,724 Nevada 42 12 386 " 402 Orange 263 . - IT 1,610 - 2,466 Placer..... . 65 2 18 - 10 Plumas 30 6 - 488 234 Riverside 177 70 1,306 " 2,222" Sacramento 330 80 " 7,428 ' 4,618 San Benito 29 - "17 721-' 922 San Bernardino 365 13 752 . 399 San Diego 752 17 1,002 817 San Francisco ...1,181 1,179 150,304 125,53 San Joaquin 247 53 3,827 4,283 San Luis Obispo .90 5 1,191 '1,105 San Mateo 303 136 3.136 4,439 Santa Barbara 132" 73 -13,983 - -.5,821 Santa Clara 374 41 3,626 . A2,583. Santa Cruz... 110 30 1.715,. .2,363 Shasta 61 18 701 482 Sierra 13 6 150 177 Siskiyou " 75 31 ' ' , 1,009 - 1,570 Solano ..: 136 7 326 402 Sonoma ..; ;' 181 .43 2,749 . . , 3,356 Stanislaus 146 88 . 5,508 . 6,313 Sutter I 39 28 1,130, . 1,318 Tehama 55 1 13 645 62a Trinity. .21 18 562 443 Tulare 154 84 4,165 5,314 Tuolumne '48 1 6 . 363 263 Ventura 135 57 4,583, 3,718 Yolo 52 11 805 , . . 587 Yuba 38 30 , 1,654 ; 2,904 Total 14,850 8,799 . 690,411 622.986 DOWNEY HOLDS LEAD; STATE GOES FOR F.D.R. Continued from First Page publican and Democratic PresL dential nominees. First . returns from Beverly Hills precincts gave Dewey a 2-to-l lead over Roosevelt and showed Houser leading Downey better 'than 2 to 1. Yesterday's landslide vote in California swamped many poll ing places. . - ' In several areas the voting was suspended when the official closing hour of 7 p.m. was reached and election officers resumed operations after receiving instructions from the office of Registrar of Voters. In a number of instances the balloting ceased temporarily, un til fresh supplies of ballots could be rushed from election -head quarters. v Throughout the day and with out the traditional slump dur ing the midday hours the great army of electors marched steadily, to the polls. Numerous challenges were made, but the balloting generally was conducted in an orderly fashion. With few marked exceptions the contest between Roosevelt arid Dewey in the Los Angeles area developed into a struggle between pro-Roosevelt voters in the city of Los Angeles and pro-Dewey supporters in outlying communities and rural sections... , i Hornier Ahead in Pomona Half of South Pasadena's pre cincts gave Dewey an almost 3-to-l lead over his opponent, and approximately 25' per cent of Pasadena's "249 precincts snowed Dewey leading by ap proximately 5 to 3. The "same relative standing of me two candidates was shown in reports from three-fourths of Pomona's precincts, where Hou ser also had a substantial mar gin over Downey. - r From Santa Barbara early re turns snowed Dewey ahead, and the G.O.P: nominee showed unexpected strength in San Bernardino, where he trailed the President by only a few hundred votes. Roosevelt ran far ahead of the New York Governor in Hawthorne where the pro-fourth-term voters also gave Downey a wide margin over Houser. One precinct in Vernon gave Roosevelt 23 votes and Dewey 2, while in Eagle Rock the President was given but 3 votes to 29 for Dewey in one precinct ' Situation Reversed Long Beach voters were giving Roosevelt a 10-to-8 lead over Dewey in mounting returns and of Ballots which leaped to the rescue, voters at several places were still standing in line at the 7 p.m. "Closing" time waiting for ballots. When Trecinct No. 2249 at 3234 Drew St. ran out shortly before the polls were scheduled to close, officials there didn't wait for a supplementary supply to arrive from headquarters, but merely borrowed some from a -near-by -precinct awhile approximately 20 voters patiently waited. in Arcadia the reverse occurred with Dewey ahead by a ratio, of 13-to-8. Inconclusive returns on Proposition No. 11 "$60 at 60" showed this measure trailing. Pre-election forecasts of an 85 per cent turnout of the State's 4,141.331 registrants were apparently realized in all of the major population centers and in many rural areas. . More than 1.500,000 of Los An-geles County's 1,785,395 regis, tered voters were- believed to have marked ballots before the polls closed. '' Both See Victory The unprecedented size of th vote in California led both Demo cratic and Republican leaders to issue: late afternoon statements expressing confidence in the outcome. , r From Democratio headquai. ters came a prediction . that President Roosevelt will carry the State "in excess of 500,000.", Republican optimism was reflected in G.O.P. campaign head quarters assurances that "Califor nia will go to Dewey by mora than 150,000." " . ; Evidence - of the tremendous popular interest in election Issues was furnished at dawn tOf day when thousands of voter began to assemble long befor the polls opened at 7 a.m. Wait In Drizzle Los Angeles County Registrar5 of Voters Mike Donoghue said that certain areas probably would turn in totals In excess ofl the estimated 85 per cent tally. Weather conditions generally in Los Angeles and other sections of Southern California improved during the day. Hun-dreds of voters, however, stood patiently outside polling places in a light drizzle when the balloting started. ' Anxiety concerning possible election day violence, proved, to be largely unjustified as not more than the ordinary number or minor complaints were re ceived either at police stations or by election officials. The most serious incident of the day was reported of all places on the second floor of the City Hall, where officers appeared in answer to a call to terminate a political argument between two men in the corri dor just outside the City Coun-cil chambers. Too-Zealons Warned - Donoghue's office, nerve center of the election here, was beset by hundreds of oalls. Most of them, he said, were for routine election advice on procedure. while a few comDlained that electioneering was believed . in progress too close to the polls. All the latter complaints were checked and where necessary, settled by a warning. Evidence of the seriousness with which the populace took the balloting was evident as many campaign workers used up treasured gasoline to drive elder, ly and infirm voters to the polls. Probably the dean of voters in the city turned out to be Dr. John W. Dill, 101. of 1513 Victoria Ave.; who cast his ballot at Precinct No. 1753, at 4359 Victoria Park Drive. A Civil War veteran, Dr. Dill cast his first vote 80 years ago for Abraham Lincoln and has been a lifelong Republican. -

What members have found on this page

Get access to Newspapers.com

  • The largest online newspaper archive
  • 19,400+ newspapers from the 1700s–2000s
  • Millions of additional pages added every month

Publisher Extra Newspapers

  • Exclusive licensed content from premium publishers like the The Los Angeles Times
  • Archives through last month
  • Continually updated

Try it free