The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on April 27, 1931 · Page 4
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 4

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Blytheville, Arkansas
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Monday, April 27, 1931
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Page 4
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BLYTHRV1LLE. (AUK.) COURIER NEWS THE BLYTHEVILLE COURIER NEWS THB COURIER NEWS CO., 1'UBLISILERS O. B. BABCOCK. Editor H. W. HAINES, Advertising Mao»g«r • Sole MaUoDkl AdYertlslng Represeuistlvci: TUB Ttomu f. OUrk Co. Inc., New York, Philadelphia AU»nt», Dtllw, San Antonio, Eau ftaucUco, Chicago, St. Ixiuls. Published Ever; Afternoon Except, Sunday. Enf«re<l u ««cond clus manor at Hie post office tt BlythevUle, Arkansas, under act ot CoDgreu October 9, 1917. Served by the United Press SUBSCRIPTION RATES By currier in the city of Dlythevllle, 15c per week or 1630 per yeir in advance. By mill within a, rtdlus of 50 miles, $3.00 per jetr, H.M for six month], tic for three months; by mail In postal tone* two to ilx, inclusive, M.50 per year, in zones seven and eight, $10.00 per year, payable In advance. The Cause Of Crime No more pictures dealing with the underworld will be produced \iy tlic Paramount-Publix Corporation. S. R. Kent, vice president in charge of distribution, made this announcement the other day—taking pains, at the same time, to deny emphatically that gangster movies have been responsible for crime waves. Tliis action came only a few days after Police Commissioner Mulroonoy of New York had charged that motion pictures and tabloid newspapers were chiefly responsible for the increase of crime among city youths. Mr. Kent, explaining his company's action, said simply that crime pictures have been overdone and that the public 1 is tired of them. Thus, while he does not accept Commissioner Mulrooney's criticism, he at least takes an action that ought to help make the commissioner happy. The general public probably will welcome a diminution in the number of gangster movies. The general public also is at least partially in agreement with the .New York police commission- erj'raifd ;lhc '.whole business needs n little more intelligent consideration than it usually, gets. ' An impressionable youngster may, now and then, be led into crime by a lurid movie; but in general it is safe, to say that blaming the movies for the gang wars of the big cities is nothing but an easy way out of a per-. plexing 1 situation. As long as we can soothe our conscience by an "explanation" of that kind we shall continue to have crime waves. Indeed, one of the big reasons for bad crime conditions in American cities is the fact that all of us arc content to find isomc obvious scapegoat like the moving picture. We blame the movie and the tabloid and conveniently forget about the bad housing conditions that provide crime with its best spawning ground. Wo blame the movie and the tabloid and overlook the fact that half a dozen good playgrounds, properly placed and rightly directed, would do more to keep city children from going astray than all the "uplift" in the world. We blame the movie and the tabloid and shut our eyes to the fact that every one of us who buys a pint of gin helps to pay for the upkeep of the army of professional gunmen. We 'overlook the social and economic conditions that produce big city gangs —because fixing those conditions so that they would no longer produce gangs would be altogether too much trouble. Being lazy, we prefer to put up with the gangs. Why not blame them on the movies and the newspapers? It's so much easier. It's just about time that we gave up these cheap excuses. The roots of organized crime today go right to the foundations of American society. Cheap movies have no more to do with it than the price of bustles in Afghanistan. —Bruce Catton. A Warning For Drivers Flying a kite hardly seems, on the surface, to' he u hazardous occupation. Nevertheless, the National Safety Council warns that spring kite-dying by children has become in recent years a growing source of serious accidents. Sometimes kite .strings come across high-tension electric wires. Sometimes a running child trips and falls over an unseen obstruction. More often the youngster, his eye on his kite, runs into the street into the path of an automobile. The point is that alniost any form of outdoor recreation can be dangerous for children in these days of crowded streets. The remedy is largely up to the motorist. Every driver must realize that playing children are apt to dash out in the street lit any lime, and must govern himself accordingly. Complicated and Expensive Determining the guilt or innocence of persons' accused of crime seems to bo getting to be a complicated and expensive business. Detroit recently put three men on trial for the murder of Gerald Buckley, the popular young radio announcer who was shot to death last summer at the climax of a hot political campaign. T|ie other .day the three men were acquitted—after a trial that lusted 15 weeks, cobt the state .something like ?500,000 and saw 130 witnesses testify for the prosecution alone. '.The machinery must be a little bit out of gear when one criminal trial can take up that much time and money. If we were as fond of efficiency as we are supposed to be, we would insist on immediate repairs. SIDE GLANCES By George Clarkj "It's my girl. Bill—pretend you're my secretary and tell her 1m attending an important conference." WASHINGTON LETTER Maybe Panama Canal Hasn't DCOH All — Figures 111 Number of Fewer Ships Canal Oulcrown Afltr Show Decrease Ships Passing Through tn Lasl Three. Years— U. S. May IJuilil New Locks BY ICODNEY DUTCHER NEA Service Writer WASHINGTON— Government experts have been 'reassuring the country that the'Nlcaraguan-cartli- Quake should and would have no ( . ........ _ elTcct on the project for a Ncara-j drop has 'been partly due to the guau canal, but what may retard general depression. as compared with 4224 for (he first right months of fiscal year 1930. If the present year gees on at the rate tiius far its total will be about 5715 ships. TODAY IS THE-/ ilV-RRSAj FINAL AREAS ATTACKS On April 21, 1917, the English launched the first of the final al- tacks on an eight-mile front north of Monchy-le-Preux. General Sir Douglas Halg, British commander, reports It as follows: "The assault was bunched at 4:25 a. m. by ' British and Canadian troops and resulted in heavy fight- ins which continued throughout the greater part of the 28th snd 28th of April. Tiie enemy deliverer! counter-attack after counter-attack with the greatest determination and most lavish expenditure o[ men. Our positions at Gavrelb alono v:ere again attacked seven times with strong forces, and on each occasion the enemy was repulsed with great loss. "In spite of the enemy's desperate resistance, the village of Arleux- en-Gohelle was captured by Canadian troops, after bitter hanci-to- hand flg'nting; and English troop? made further progress in the neigh- borhocd of Oppy, on Greenland Hill, and between Monc]iy-!c-Preux and the Sc.irpc. In addition lo these advances, another 1000 German prisoners were taken by us in the coarse of two days' fighting." That will mean that the number of ships using the canal has decreased for three successive years--although not with a proportional decrease In tonnage or tolls— but It is pointed out lhat the recent Commission Doubts Remedy Will Cure WASHINGTON, IUP> — Tile Federal Trade Commission leans somewhat to the opinion that a lover of tobacco cannot be made F to stop using'the product. - : The commission has received a stipulation signed by a vendor offering for sale directly to the public a compound which, according to advertisements and circular literature, will banish Hie craving of a human being for tobacco and do it in a relatively short time, in which it agrees to cea^e making claims' held by the commissiiii to be "false and misleading." The commission held "that the •emedy offered will not stop the labit of using tobacco nor will it banish the craving." it in the fad that the old stor? aiwut (he Panama Canal bccom- Ing outgrown has been effectively knocked In I he head. It has been estimated officially that with the growth of canal traffic—figuring In increases of business, population growth in South Argument for a second canal fro:u j America, steamship line expansion the Atlantic lo the Pacific is now and so on—the capacity of the based almost entirely on the argu- Panama ditch woulrt be reached mchts that a Nicaragua!! canaliabout 10CO. At the same .time it would provide faster transit for I his always been kno\vn that in- slilps plying from Gulf ports or the I stallatlon of a third set of locks "Keep your hands to yourself," us the bridge player said to his talkative partner. The British government has stopped giving free matches to members of the House of Commons. Starting its economy move from scratch, apparently. Walter Hampden, stage star, called New York critics shortsighted when they gave unfavorable reviews of Ills performance. That's not the way to net. Walter, OUT OUR WAY By Williams A LOT BETTER THAT OLD TREE SHE'S ' onesseo so DO AKI-^ WORV< — - €>O IF ACCIDEMr, SVAE. MV&HT T 1 DO A LlTTUE , MMHM LtT U.iM DO MOT FOR -TTMAT <BORT OF- LtT HIKA Do QUICK E.>CtV\T east coast to the west coast nndj lhat it would have a distinct mill-! tnry value. ' i The condition that it would be .much better in lime of wnr to have tuo canals in case one were blocked up or destroyed Is met with the assertion that our military and naval forces In the Caribbean would have to be divide;! to protect two and that if one canal could be blown up or something, so, presumably, couUl the other. Would Save Time Nevertheless, although the fact apparently v;as given no decisive weight when the Panama route was selected originally, it is estimated that vessels sailing from one American coast lo the other would save an average ol two days despite the fact that transit through the Nicaraguan canal would take 2-1 hours to the Panama Canal's eight. And that fact is likely lo have more effect on Congress than the military argument. Meanwhile, at the end of this fiscal year the Panama Canal probably will have been use 1 ! by fc«'er ships than In nny year since 192G- 27. Some 5-115 ships passed through In that year, 6450 in 1928. 0413 in IMS and G185 in 1030. The first eight months of the iiscni year 1031 showed 3300 ships passed through at a ccst of about SIW.000,000 would double the present capacity and to all intents and purposes 3ive tlic Panama Canal capacity big enough for all time. Sooner or later Congress will be found debating the question whether it is best lo builrt the third set of Icck.t or a new canal to cost between ?5W.OOO,000 and $800,000,000 Wuulc! Take 10 Years Work on the new locks would have to begin about 10 years before they were actually In operation and the Niearngnan cana probably could be built in no shorter time. Construction of the third set of locks has been en vlsagcd all along; there's a rock foundation for them in case the; are built. The Interoceanic Canal Board o army ami civilian engineers, a directed by Congress, is complet Ing a survey and report on In. canal situation which will make nc\v estimates on the various phases such ns cost, commercial values and capacities and cover exhaustively tlie various problems presented. Besides reporting on the new locks and Nicaragua!! canal projects the cn«inccrs will give the results of a study as to the feasibility of lowering the Panama Canal to sea level. School Board Turns Down Smoking Ban EMPORIA, Kas., (UP)—Because he school board members ' here Felt they couldn't ask the men cachers not to smoke as long ns same of the numbers of the board smoked, they also felt they couldn't ask the women" teachers not t osmoke if the men teachers smoked. This reasoning recently prevent- „ „,.. „ .,_ cd a clause from Betting into the | music. The next time "l MONDAY, APRIL 27, jijjy^ OPAP/NE NEAR MINNESOTA IN ~TH£tK. P/aoRER. CHURCH EXCUSES —-By George TV. Bar pay special.attention to his preach- such as his subjects, his type of services, his delivery, and the the more I see and hear about length of his sermon prayed standing or kneeling. Then vlnced that the Churches are pretty welt fillet! up with hypocrites. would then try and watch ^ those So you can sec that T would not in their every day -life :and want to get mixed up with such conducted- •.himself 1 visiting around with the various churches seme argue that everyone Is te-jj sponsible for himself or herself, tills time trying to but it will be so much less trouble thiit just suits me and it looks for me to get along if all of these like there Is something wrong with things are to my satisfaction. And when I find a Church that has no hypocrites In it and is n all ol them. I made up my mind I would try a new plan, t wcutci go one time j ideal, then they are not going (o each Church and pay no atten- ( have much trouble getting me? J:! (ion lo anything but the members join. That is, if it's a churcV —the way they conducted themselves and the way they dressed and the way they acted or treated each other. Then when I had finished this T would make the rounds again and get R line on the ~" ' "~ would 1031-32 contracts of Emporia city; give my attention to tlic general school teachers. The clause would prohibit women teachers from smoking in vniublic, or in private. conditions and surroundings. Then I would make my next- visit to see the Preacher In action. I would that has the kind of Baptism that j conforms to my It might be all right every way but on tills ? cne point. There is one tiling sure | —It must be entirely free of .hypo- j critcs and must. be .fcce^qf -."debts > and I will have to be tlioroughly : ! satisfied os lo it's appropriation^to : | take care of the expense. aril ; ;riot !* s;nd tco much money out ori-inls- : ij sions. .' ;,.v;' J New Treatment Effective In Curing Varicose Veins nv !>K. MOUUIS risiir.Kix Ddilcr. Journal of th? AiKrrii'.in Medical Association, :i:ul i:f iiy_ gcia, the Hrallli M:ij;.i>liir During the las', five years continued experimentation jas fir.ai'.y ro- sullcd in the establishment of !»oih- ods of Injecling varicose \?\\:-, in order to obliterate them. ;<•.:•.] n method formerly exceedingly doubtful has become reco;;n!«<i ;n safe and worth while. As with all other incilk.il prr:e- riurcs, much depends en •.!•..- y.ib- stancc that is used, l^c- r.'.i.:i::or in which the Injection u m.i kind of case sc-lccterl for m and many other lactn:- ix>rlance. The met hod ;-. • that can be \isod en r-vrrv regardless of tl:o extent o U! costly or the place In «ii varicose veins happen to I.-.Sometimes people ,•.;:!; veins complain of pain ;n or in the calf mnsc'rs •,-.:-,. relate lo (he veins, bur .. actually due lo dMannih-.., ness of other (issues. T. ;• of Ihc varicose vcli.s v.i.; move the symploais of -A- patient complain?. N'ot Infrequently ti'.cr;- .1; rcnccs of the varicose M-. the injections to;' the .-.ar.;.: tliat the varicose \vm ; response to a rlrain r:- :; (system which is mrrdv u.i 'lo other veins when ihwr i; • one p.: vm i.irl- •'• the vv.cd. iru-aus •- they ;:•:-. is ur .iftcr .i sot: previously dilated arc oblitornlccl. Sometimes ako Ihe recurrence may be due to the fact that the work las been Incomplete and that an nsumcicnt amount of the vein has been removed. The injection method of Ircating varicose veins is fairly simple. The jhs'sician. having located Ihe e.\- ent of the dilated portion. Injects Into the vein a substance which causes an irritation of the \vat!s of ;he blood vowel and which causes :he blood in the vessel to coagulate, the walls ihcn grow together and the vein disappears. The technique is being nidc!y dissemlr.ntcd among the medical profession. With properly controlled conditions, ihc results seem. to be gcort in the vast majority ot cases, ami the entire procedure may be counted today as one of ihc important advances ol medical science in recent years. HAVE YOU MET THE LADY WHO NEVER READS THE ADS? Go into her kitchen. The shelves are filled with familiar brands of soup and soap and foods of all sorts. Her electric iron and ice-box have been advertised regularly. So have her rugs and towels and table silver. Somebody must have been reading "the ads" — asking for known quality .. . buying the Goods giving them leadership.. Few women now arc content to miss the marvelous comforts of the imes.. Almost every one is planning to make next year easier and pleasantcr than this year. You read the advrtisements with interest because in them you find the freshest news and the most practical ideas about keeping house— and about all other branches of the modern art of living. Academy Seeks More Monkeys PAlilS. iUP)-Thc Academy of Nfcdicinc hss asked the Government to provide more monk»js to prepare sufficient serum to figiu the yellow lever in Africa. Tlic Government a;k:d vhc Academy in increase Its product'cn of sen™ The. Academy replied by a ;l-.:Jri .•nts I letter sis Ihg "Give us'inroc mon- ; .Q3ii ke>s first. : red Naturally, your interest and your confidence grow when you see the same product appearing over and over again. Improved ... better now than ever, but an old friend, anyway. Something you can rely on to meet a need, and do a job. Follow the advertisements in Una paper carciully. They are full of interesting facts and useful ideas. They will save yen time and money .. . and bring you becttcr things Read Cciiri:r News want ads.

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