Mt. Vernon Register-News from Mt Vernon, Illinois on April 17, 1952 · Page 4
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Mt. Vernon Register-News from Mt Vernon, Illinois · Page 4

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Thursday, April 17, 1952
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THE REGISTER-NEWS — MT. VERNON, ILLINOIS THURSDAY, APRIL 17, 1952 MT. VERNON REGISTER-NEWS (OAILT EXCEPT SUNDAY) MT. VBBNOM «EWS ESTABLISHED 1871 MT. VERNON REGISTER ESTABLISHED 1883 CONSOLIDATED SEPTEMBER 28. 1820 Theyll Do It Every Time ti >iMii »»n.»—e«w BDWIN BACKAWAT. C. X THOMPSON ORfAN METCALF 6. a. BHEHORN , Editor Busineii H&narer News Editor Plant Sup«rimendent MEMBER OP THE ASSOCIATED PRESS— Th« Aisodated Pres* 1> exclusive!; entitled to the use for the publication of all new* credited to It or not otheriviie credited la thli paper and alao tbe local news publitbed therein. Entered as Second Clan matter for trans- portatlon through tbe malls at the Post Office at Mount Vernon. Illinois, under the tc{ of March 3. 18 70. SOBSCRIPTION RATES Subacrlptions must bs paid in adranc*— By mail, Jefferson county and ad- Joining counties per year S moB. 53.75: 3 mos, $2.25: 1 tno. By mail outside Jefferson and ad- Joining counties within 250 miles: year $8.00; 6 mos. $6.00: 3 mos. $3.25: per single month Outside 250 miles, year $9.00; 8 mos. $5.76: 3 mos. $3,75: one month Delivered by carrier In city per week JS6 $6.00 1.00 1.25 1.80 <?fiT A Thought For Today And Philip said, If thou believest with all thine heart, thou mayest. And he answered and said, I believe that Jesus Christ Is the Soo of God.—Acts 8:37. 4> * * * Men who neglect Christ, and try to win heaven through moralities, are like sailors at sea In a storm, who pull, some at the bowsprit and some at the mainmast, but never touch the helm.—Beecher EDITORIAL YOU CAN'T PREDICT 'WEATHER' FROM RED PEACE ZEPHYRS B REEZES WHICH SEEM TO BEAR a hope of peace are blowing in from the East these days. But spring and Joe Stalin being the unpredictable institutions they are, it's hard at this time to tell a peace breeze from another April wind. • The latest zephyr from Moscow bears tidings that the retiring Indian ambassador there says Stalin believes there's no major world problem which can't be solved by negotiation. The diplomat. Sir Sarvapalli Radhakrishnan, who based his statements on a farewell interview with Stalin, said the Russian leader thought "every effort" should be made to get leaders of major nations together to talks things over. Later, in London, Prime Minister Churchill said he would be willing to sit down and talk peace with Stalin "if the circumstances and the situation were favorable." That qualification, of course, could mean almost anything, but at least Churchill didn't take a negative attitude. * * * W HAT GIVES the Indian ambassador's statement some point, Is that it follows shortly after Stalin, unexpectedly as a spring gqirall, ehose to answer a series of questions sent to him by a group of American newspaper editors. •-True, he didn't say much. Rather, it was what he didn 't say that gave some season for optimism. He indicated his belief that another world war was growing no closer. He said nothing particularly ominous. ' • These things in themselves signify little. The world has tried too long to read hope into the breezes from off the Russian plains. But hope springs eternal, and what season is more enernally fraught with hc^e than spring? , Which brings us to another point for optimism. Observers in Korea report a persistent, if almost indefinable, feeling that an armistice there is not far off, despite the continued deadlock in formal negotiations. '•" • • • R BPORTEES ON THE SCENE say there are indications the Communists appear ready to make possible compromises. This cau tious optimism was based partly on radio broadcasts from China that thfrHeds will grant immunity to all prisoners returned by the Allies. , But any political weatherman specializing in the Communist cl^ate is well aware of the phenomen of bewildering Red winds blowing from all quarters at the same time, sometimes signifying little, sogietimes meaning much. * And it would be a foolish forecaster, indeed, who, in this tricky mbnth of April, would say what the present winds portend. They cojH 'd mean that the "spring" of peace is really here, or they could mpg,n only that the- worst of the "winter" of war is over. At worst, they could mean that we'll have another heavy snow before "summer" really comes. By Jimmy Hado ,.EMEf?EBy m NOMlMATE AS lUEWORLDlS NERVIEST HOGOODbilK TME LOMS,L0M6 Tf?/^ILER-WiMDER mo PARKS IN FRONT OF ONE REST/4llRAh^- EATS IM lUE FRy-BURS >\CROSS lUE ROAD*'- 7UAfJXAA,'PA TIP OF7H£MATLOM4T -TO iv --lA C.H.REEP, The World Today By JAiMES RLARLOW AP Staff Writer Divers Dogs An«w«r to Previous Puzxio vBORIZONTAL '1 Alaskan canine '9 Breed of . hotmd dog id Seesaw U Horn 15 Fold mark 19 Guides .17 Fowl 18 Capuchin f monkey 20 Unsuited 21 Viper 6 Mountain nymph 7 Roulette wager 8A11 9 Solar disk 10 Merriment 11 Sweet secretion 12 Formerly 19 Adores 22 Gaelic 23 Hebrew month 23 Lengthwise of 24 Unaspiratcd 27 Native metal 25 River in 28 Bustle 31 Runs clockwise . (var.) i33 Epochs 34 Handle 35 California town 37. Scottish *- sheepfold S8 Turkish cap 39 Storms 40 Rugged mountain spur 42 Iron 46 Body of water 47 Pints (ab.) So Recount 02 Unit of , electrical ..intensity 64 Oil sources Sj^Gun dog S6 Avouch ,37 Rubs out :; VERTICAL 1 Engrave SWithered 3 Sharp 4PhUippinc 'Negroid 9 Letter France 26 National skating association (ab.) . 28 Eager 29 Uw tax >a hiU 30 Hops' kilns 32 Mimicker 33 Eucharistic wine vessel 36 Visionary 38 Swifter 41 Provoke 42 Malaysian canoe 43 Units of reluctance 44 Ancient Grctli country 45 Reserve 47 Many dogs ar4| household 48 Woody plan* 40 Weight of India (pi.) 81 East (Fr.) 53 Parent-teachei group (ab.) 1 z 3 H $ b 7 IT- ii 13 HI IS- lb n 18 n 20 21 2H 25 2b M m 27 J" fr vr a 32 i w 37 it MO ii 12 n IS m W r w SO H CAT AND DOG FIGHTS IN SUMMER POLITICS WASHINGTON. April 17 — (AP) — For a little while it looked like this might be a fairly calm summer for the two political parties It would have simplified things for the Democratic convention next July if President Truman wanted to run again And if he didn't, the talk went, he'd try to get the nomination for Gov. Adlai Stevenson of Illinois. That would have paved the road for Stevenson. But Truijian crossed up the picture. He decided not to run himself. And he wouldn't endorse Stevenson or anyone else. • * » • THEN STEVENSON COMPLICATED things even more by announcing yesterday he didn't want the White House .job either. When Stevensons announcement hit yesterday, the general reaction was: "Who now?" Sen. Kefauver has been going aroimd saying "my name is Estes Kefauver ma'am, and I'd sure apr- preciate your vote." He's been doing right well at it, better than any other Democrat, in fact. But this doesn't make him any odds-on favorite for the Democratic nomination. • * • * AT THIS MOMENT, the convention looks like a cat-and-dog fight among a lot of would-be candidates. This will be the first time since 1932 that there ever was really any more than one candidate before the convention started. It was Roosevelt in 1936, in 1940 and 1944. And in 1948 it was Truman. From the way things are going among the Republicans their convention next July ought to be a beaut, too. Just a short time ago the backers of General Eisenhower sounded as if the trip to the White House was just a short hike with Ike. That was after his victory over Sen. Taft in New Hampshire and Minnesota. • • * • IT WAS ALSO BEFORE TAFT who has his heart set on the White building on Pennsylvania avenue, began to lasso delegates in large flocks in other states. At the moment it might seem that the problems of the Republican convention will be simplified to the extent of having to choose between two men only, the General and the Senator. But it may not turn out that way. They may knock themselves out of the nomi-J nation if their supporters stand steadfast in a deadlock. But don't get the notion peace and quiet will be restored after the election to these troubled shores where for years now crises and name-calling have been as familiar as coffee in the morning. • » » • THERE'S PRETTY GOOD EVIDENCE to support the view that even if a Republican is elected President and the Republicans control the House, the Democrats will have a majority in the Senate nd run all the committees. That woyjd make it a little unhappy for a Republican President. And if a Democrat wins, with Democrats in a majority in both Houses, that wouldn't be a honeymoon, either. It hasn't been in the past. The Doctor Says Repeated X-ray Shoe Fittings May Be Injurious to Feet The foot troubles with which so many people are afflicted today are the result of civilization. Few, if any, primitive people who walk without shoes have either flat feet or bunions. Since we cannot go back to walking barefooted on soft, spongy ground, other methods should be sought to prevent the serious foot difficulties which affect so many. The most important thing to do is be sure that a person is well shod, not some of the time, but all of the time. Of course, keeping the feet dry and clean and giving the feet exercise—on the beach when possible, or even on the rug in the house- may help some, but the importance of choosing the right shoe is undoubtedly paramount. It is probably not necessary in most instances to use an X-ray machine or fluoroscope as an aid to fitting shoes, but this is commonly done, and the question has been raised repeatedly as to whether it might harm either the cust- tomer or the salesperson. Until recently it was difficult to answer this question correctly, but now a report on this problem has come from the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists. Possible Harm From X-ray This report points out that the use of shoe-fitting fluoroscopic devices are potentially harmful for both salespersb^s and customers. The committee has consequently issued a "guide" designed to lessen the amount of radiation (Xray) to which persons are exposed during the use of fluoroscopic shoe- fitting devices. The recommendations are too long to quote here, but they should be carefully followed by every shoe store using such a device, and should carry a warning label reading something like this: "Exposure to X-ray may be harmful. Customers must not operate this machine Limit for each customer: Five Xray shoe fitting per day, yearly total not to exceed 20 fittings." POLITICS TODAY By Assoeiatid Press More than 45,000,000,000 quarts of milk are produced annually in the United States. By Ais«clattd Press A DEMOCRATIC STATE COMMITTEE dinner in New York honors W. Averell Harriman, Mutual Security Administrator, and features speeches by Senators Robert S. Kerr of Oklahoma, Estes Kefauver of Tennessee, Brien McMahon of Connecticut, Vice President Alben Barkley and Gov. Adlai Stevenson of Illinois. (Broadcast by NBC 9:30 p. m. CST). • * * * SEN. TAFT of Ohio opens a three-day Republican campaign in Massachusetts for that state's April 29 primary. * n • • SEN. HENRY C.4BOT LODGE, JR., (R-Mass) speaks for Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower at Denver. • * » • HAROLD STASSEN speaks on a nationwide broadcast (CBS — 9:30 p. m. EST). Earthquake Explanation Here is the Malayan's explanation of an earthquake: "The earth is'a sort of egg, resting on the horns of a bull; when the bull gets angry and .shakes its head, an earthquake results." HOIT & BIRCH £ Income Tax and Bookkeeping Service Announce the removal of their office jj^ fro'^ 10091/2 Main to City Hall Building Located 1 Mile Southwest of Mt. Vernon on Waltonville Road MT. VERIV01V Drive-ln Theatre LAST TIMES TONIGHT PAUL DOUGLAS-JANET LEIGH ANGELS IN T^^^ FRIDAY and SATURDAY ROD CAMERON THE PLUNDERERS" —PLUS SECOND FEATURE— KIRBY GRANT-GAIL DAVIS IN "YOKON MANHUNT // momGHT SHOW FREE TO ALL ATTENDING EARLY SHOW ACCORDING TO MRS. HOYLE SHOW EVERY NIGHT—RAIN OR~CLEAR MAC BLUFORD WARREN CamtpentfwM Mr. and Mrs. Elton Cormvell have returned home after spending the pa.st two weeks visiting Mr. and -Mrs. B. -M. Hughes, Paul Hughes and Mr. and Mrs. John William Hughes and family of Albuquerque. New Mexico. They also spent a day with Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Huff and family. Donnie Cohvell who is attending the Virginia Military Insttute at Lexington, Va. has returned there after spending his spring \acation with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Fred Colwell and family. .Mr. and Mrs. Jim' Peterson of Creal Springs, visited her parents, Mr. and Mrs. R. J. Bise Friday. .Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Bise and family were also dinner guests. Mr. and Mrs. Jim Watson and daughters spent their vacation with their parents in Washington, Ind. The Bluford American Legion Post 1193 will hold a banquet Tuesday evening April 22, at the Webber township high school gymnasium in honor of the high school basketball players. Guest speakers will be Glen "Abe" Martin, Southern Illinois University .4th- letic Director and Lewis Brake, Illinois Veterans Commission Officer. Anv'one desiring tickets to the banquet should see Art Lovin, Homer Wilson, Noble Maxey or Tom Clark. Mr. and Mrs. Sam Martin and son.s Phillip Ray and Michael Dean and daughter Dee Ann of Kirkwood. Mo. spent Sunday with their parents, Mr. and Mrs. Mark Martin and Mr. and Mrs. Ed Sellers. Mr. and Mrs. Don Ferguson spent the weekend at Carbondale visiting their folks. Mr. and Mrs. Valentine Gutzler and sons Herbie and Ray and Mr. and Mrs. Noble Irvin spent from Thursday untill Tuesday visiting FASHION LIKES IKE— Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower 's Imminent homecoming has made more than political repsrcussions. Fashion designers, alert to a "good thing," have decided they "like Ike." Radio and television actress Maggi McNeills models a new "I like Ike" circle skirt, and an "Ike" choker of black velvet, on display at Citizens-fOr-Eisenhower headquarters In New York. their children Mr. and Mrs. Carl Gutzler in Pennsyh aiiia. Thi> address of Carl who is in service there is: Pvt. Lewi. Carl Gui/.ler, U. S. 5520494,T Btry. A .50th F. A. Bn. 5th Inf. Div. Indian Town Rap Pa. His wife, who is employed there is livinp; at 2'J)00 3rci and Emerald. HarrisburR, Pa. Mr. and Mrs. Mae Warren and James Warren spent the weekend with Mr. and Mrs. Har\(\v Lovin and children Robin and Marilyn of Peoria. They were accompanied home by Margie Warren who had spent the past week there. On the way they visited Ralph Warren and son Bill of Urliana. Ralph and Bill Warren were" also dinner guests of the Lovins Sunday, Mr. and Mrs, Robert Purcell of Indiana visited her parents. Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Modglin o\ei' the weekend. Mrs. Louie Arendale has returned to her home here after spending the winter with her daughter, Mrs. Williams near Chicago, Mrs. G. W. Modglin has nMurn- ed from Chicago where she visited her son Mitchell Modglin and family. "She was accompanied home by three of her grandchildren. New directors elected at the Bluford high school Saturdav were Wiliam Kaclin, Maxc\' Pepple and Mr. Coil. At the grade school Dwight Bray was elected. Mrs. Carrie Shellev of Kansas, Mr. and Mrs. Glen Wood of California, Mr. Chauncey Wood of Blomington, Mr. and Mrs, Keith Wo<xi and daughter Judy, Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Johnson of Mt. Vernon were dinner guests of Mr. and Mrs. Hershel Huff and family Sunday. .Mrs. Jennie Lewis and son, Charles, went to Peoria last Wednesday. They were accompanied home by Paul Lewis, Jr. who spent the weekend here. Kennie Britcnall of Joliet spent the weekend with Mr. and Mrs. Hallie Lewis and family. Mr. Paul Power spent fi-om Tuesday till Friday in Virginia. He was accompanied home by his mother. Mrs. Anna Pate of Mt. Vernon spent the weekend with Mr. and .Mrs. John Kovach and son Jimmie, Mr. Louie Schmitz of Centralia was a Sunday evening visitor. Mr. and Mrs. Paul Powers, Mr. and Mrs. Jim Watson, Mr. and Mrs. Art Lovin, Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Body, Mr. Loyd Esmon and Ray Gutzler went to St. Louis Sunday o\cning to see the Harlem Globetrotters. .Mrs. Aretha York and son Gary will leave Wednesday to go to St, Louis to bp with her husband who is rn undergo an operation on his throat at Barnes Hospital on Thursday morning. Mrs. H. B. Carpenter and Mrs. W. S Culpepper of Mt. Vernon attended the Bluford P. T. A. meeting Tuesday night and took part in the installation of new officers The music dept. of Webber touTiship high school will hold a IF IT COMES FROM BORDEN'S ITS GOTTA BE GOOD' Located Downtown Between Broadway and Main on 13th St. FREE DELIVERY CALL 808 - 809 "The Biggesf Little Store in Town" All Grinds Dining Car QIA COFFEE ... _ ,b 00 Borden's Fresh Home Made HAM FFC SALAD .... ,h Choice Large Golden Fancy OQc BANANAS 2ib .Z7 Fancy Large Puffed and Seeded Muscat RAISINS . 2 bxs 49c CURRANTS lu7... 21* Swift's Premium Skinles.s WIENERS C/e 1 lb. cello pkg. DO F"ancy Hot House Fresh Cri »p LEAF 00< LETTUCE ... .b Z7 Fancy Large Puffed and Seeded Muscat RAISINS . 2 bxs 49c CURRANTS lu7... 21* Swift's Choice Lean BEEF CQ^ Fresh Ground ih %J0 Garden Fresh GREEN ONIONS 1 1c RADISHES 3 bchs 11 Value Brand GREEN BEANS.. 2 S,- JO Swift's Choice Lean BEEF CQ^ Fresh Ground ih %J0 Garden Fresh GREEN ONIONS 1 1c RADISHES 3 bchs 11 Value Brand GREEN BEANS.. 2 S,- JO Choice Loin End PORK AQc ROAST .... ,h17 Fancy California Carrots .. 2 behs. 23c Fresh Firm Ripe Tomatoes . tube 24c Swift's All Sweet OLEO-Colored CQc Quarters. 2 ibs 37 Choice Loin End PORK AQc ROAST .... ,h17 Fancy California Carrots .. 2 behs. 23c Fresh Firm Ripe Tomatoes . tube 24c Swift's All Sweet OLEO-Colored CQc Quarters. 2 ibs 37 U. S. Govt. Inspected Lean Juicy Choicp PORK CHOPS r Qe Center Cut . ib Di Fancy California Carrots .. 2 behs. 23c Fresh Firm Ripe Tomatoes . tube 24c Fancy Whole Long Grain Riceland Rice 07< 2 1-lb. boxes . 0/ U. S. Govt. Inspected Lean Juicy Choicp PORK CHOPS r Qe Center Cut . ib Di Fancy Florida 216 Sweet Juicy Oranges do*. 35c Ruby Red Grapefruit . 3 for 25c Del Monte Rich Red TOMATO JUICE 90c 46 oz. can ... OZ Swift's Select Branded Tender Juicy BEEF ROAST /7c All Cuts _._ ,h 0/ Fancy Florida 216 Sweet Juicy Oranges do*. 35c Ruby Red Grapefruit . 3 for 25c Del Monte Rich Red TOMATO JUICE 90c 46 oz. can ... OZ Swift's Select Branded Tender Juicy BEEF ROAST /7c All Cuts _._ ,h 0/ Heinz Fancy CATSUP ci;^ 214-oz. bottles DD PAPER GOODS Plates doz pkg. 18c Napkins ... box 15c Scott Towels 2 rolls 41c Large .SOO Size Bo.xes Kleenex .. 2 bxs 53c Swift's Select Branded Tender Juicy BEEF ROAST /7c All Cuts _._ ,h 0/ Heinz Fancy CATSUP ci;^ 214-oz. bottles DD PAPER GOODS Plates doz pkg. 18c Napkins ... box 15c Scott Towels 2 rolls 41c Large .SOO Size Bo.xes Kleenex .. 2 bxs 53c Swift's Sliced 1 Lh. Layer BACON „, 43c SIDE By the pieep 39* Schuize Oven Fresh Crackers i Lb box 25* Graham Crackers i Lb. box 33* Lemon Creme Sandwich Cookies lo oz. pug. 29* PAPER GOODS Plates doz pkg. 18c Napkins ... box 15c Scott Towels 2 rolls 41c Large .SOO Size Bo.xes Kleenex .. 2 bxs 53c Swift's Select Branded Tender Juicy CUBE Qic STEAKS ..... O'f Schuize Oven Fresh Crackers i Lb box 25* Graham Crackers i Lb. box 33* Lemon Creme Sandwich Cookies lo oz. pug. 29* PAPER GOODS Plates doz pkg. 18c Napkins ... box 15c Scott Towels 2 rolls 41c Large .SOO Size Bo.xes Kleenex .. 2 bxs 53c Swift's Select Branded Tender Juicy CUBE Qic STEAKS ..... O'f Birds Eye Frozen ORANGE Juice 2 cans 41c GRAPEFRUIT Juice 2 cans 31c Special On P'rozen Birds Eye VEGETABLES 10% OH (In Dozen Lots) Charmin Soft Toilet Tissue roit 37* Swift's Select Branded Tender Juicy CUBE Qic STEAKS ..... O'f Birds Eye Frozen ORANGE Juice 2 cans 41c GRAPEFRUIT Juice 2 cans 31c Special On P'rozen Birds Eye VEGETABLES 10% OH (In Dozen Lots) Charmin Soft Toilet Tissue roit 37* Roth's Fresh Rich Homogenized MILK .... 2qts 41c WHIPPING CREAM .. '/2 pt. 35c Fresh Dated i Lb. Creamed Carton COTTAGE CHEESE 28c Birds Eye Frozen ORANGE Juice 2 cans 41c GRAPEFRUIT Juice 2 cans 31c Special On P'rozen Birds Eye VEGETABLES 10% OH (In Dozen Lots) Swift's Shortening Swiftning 3 it, can 85c Jewel - _. 3 lb can 79c Swift's 12 oz. jar Peanut Butter .. 39c Roth's Fresh Rich Homogenized MILK .... 2qts 41c WHIPPING CREAM .. '/2 pt. 35c Fresh Dated i Lb. Creamed Carton COTTAGE CHEESE 28c Birds Eye Frozen ORANGE Juice 2 cans 41c GRAPEFRUIT Juice 2 cans 31c Special On P'rozen Birds Eye VEGETABLES 10% OH (In Dozen Lots) Today In WASHINGTON (Times are Central Standard) SENATE Considers supplemental appropriation bill (11). Armed Services Subcommittee continues hearings on p,\tra pay for air and submarine service (9). Banking Committee holds closed door mooting on legislation to extend economic controls (9:30). Elections subcommittee caWs broadcasting officials on election law reforms (9) HOl'SK Adjourned until April 22. WHITE HOUSE President Truman holds conference (3:^0). ncwi YOUR You dislike writing letters. WRONG: Put off answering letters as long as possible. RIGHT: Realize that the longer you put off writing a letter the harder the letter is to write—for you must explain your delay and make apologies for it. music concert Friday April 18, at the high school auditorium. It will be directed by Mr. Claire Jenkens music instructor. Mr, and Mrs. Ernest Bumpus of Hill Top visited Mr. and Mrs. R. J. Bise Saturday evening. FOX THEATRES Continuous Daily From 2:00 P M GRANADA NOW SHOWING! NINE DESPERATE MEN! ...LIVING THE LAST CHAPTER IN OUTLAW HISTORY! ALL NEW GUN- BLAZING THRILLS! OlHRRON • UMVtBSAt.rNI|l>M»tlOM« Itornng AUDIE MURPHY VV£TT« DIK^AY • letf 8li »CKJ0» PLUS FUN HIT it •wrvusAMNntMAiiowM gW^^^^ STADIUM —Now Showing— • FEATURE SHOWN AT« 3:35 - 4:50 - 7:0.'5 - 9:15 PLAZA -Now Showing- '4 4 PLUS 1/1UR[[N0MA JOHN PAYNE T ripoli HOWMDdaSILl/A

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