The Olpe Optimist from Olpe, Kansas on July 4, 1907 · 1
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The Olpe Optimist from Olpe, Kansas · 1

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Location:
Olpe, Kansas
Issue Date:
Thursday, July 4, 1907
Page:
1
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Lti OLPE OPTIMI VOL. 1, NO. 4. -OLPE, KANSAS, THURSDAY, JULY 4, 1907- 91.00 Per Year. i r ST. Gelegenheiten des ikenschen . Ingalls. (Uebersetzt von J. I., Ziebolz) 'uer -Men-sen 1st seines eigenen (thickes Schmied." , , Meister des Menschen 'Zukunft; Ruf, Liebe und , Reichthum auf meine Fusstapfen warten; - Durch Stadt und Felder reise ich, , Ieh dringe in die Wuesten und die Seen weit entfernt Geh vorbei, bei Hutte und Palast Bald, oder spaeter klopfe ich unge ruf en einmahl an jede Thur. Ob schlafend, wachend; erhebe dich ehe ich von dannen geh. 1 , Es ist die Stunde der Verheissung Und alle die, welche mir folgen ' - errcichen jene Plaetze welche wir' Sterbliche uns wunschen Und besiegen jeden Feind, ausser deiri Tode selbst. Waehrend alle diese, welche zweifeln oder warten; Schon in voraus verdammt sind zum Untergang, Arumt und Vemagen -Suche mich erfolglos und bitt urn-sonst ' ' Ich antworte nicht und kehr nicht mehr zurrueck. 1 I t is with pleas ure that we here present to our readers a portrait of Henry W. Brink-man, together with a short story of his life, and his successful efforts to secure a thorough education, as his achievments are not only w e 1 1 worthy of mention, but should be an inspiration to other young people, encouraging" them in a like determination tp become proficient in some honorable calling. Mr. Brinkman was born in Class-1 ....... " t trop, Germany, April 30, 1881. Soon after this, his parents decided to make their home in America, . and in June 1882, the family landed in New York- ity going from that place to Decatur, Illinois; they remained there till 1884, when they removed . to Garnett, Kansas,' and after about one year's residence there, came to Olpe to settle down. From about six years to the age of thirteen, Henry attended the Catholic school here, then entered the public school till he graduated there from. Having" thus received a good common school education, and while working on his father's farm, he made up his mind to become an architect. About.this time his father began the construction of a fine residence on the home place,' and being himself , a pro fessional carpenter, tfc,is afforded the boy a fine opportunity for getting a' practical start in his chosen life work. So quick was he to learn, that much of the finest work on the structure wa.s entrusted to him, and as it is one; of the finest residence buildings in this part of Kansas, it will be seen that his progress in the knowledge of building was indeed rapid. In 1902, ,feeling the need of more business knowledge, he entered the Emporia Business College for a term. After this he wnrkpd fnr f!nn tractor AT - n ' ' i . t n. .a vi. wucKenoerger oi tnis piace, nrsi as journeyman, later as sub-contractor, building a residence for Matt Waechter. , ifanuary .1, 1004, he entered the" Department of Architecure of. the' State Agricultural College for a four-years' course. During his vacations he work- 1 4fWf&&& 1 1V Entered as second-class matter, October 23, 1906,- at the post office at Olpe, Kansas, under the act of Congress of March 3, 1879. . Published weekly by - - H. B. Albertson. 1 . Insure tL Shawnee, Residence of Mr. and Mrs. Theo. Brinkman, parents of Henry Brinkman, near Oipe, Kansas. means to defray his entire expenses at Manhattan. Among the contracts he had during this time we may mention the residence buildings of H.-'-Weideman, Theo. Voeste, .William Schultz, Sr., and N. S. Wend-ling. ? . ). ' ' . . ':- As evidence of Mr. Brinkman's high stand j.pg at school, and the good esteem in which he was heM bv his fel low students, it is amply sufficient - to say; that during his second year at Manhattan he was honored by election into the Greek letter fra'ternity, "Kappa Delta Pi:" and to .reproduce the following extract from a letter received by the Optimist from Prof. Walters,' of the college: "Mr. Brinkman will graduate here in June.-. He is a very bright, ener getic, hard-working young man. We all like him, and predict for him a life of effective usefulness." ,-, , The above information was given by tke Professor voluntarily, and needs no comment. While at school Mr. Brinkman executed plans and specifications for numerous buildings, earning a handsome sum of money . in this way. A partial list of these is as follows: Residences in Ohio and Oregon, which work was secured for him by travelling men, on account of the fine appearance of a Manhattan building designed by him; a $15,000 church edifice in Manhattan, also some half dozen residences there, and a large addition ,to one of the college buildings; the new $25,000 school building in Emporia, also a $5,000 residence there. He now has the contracts for five Man- IMS IS hattan buildings. Mr. Brinkman graduated in the science of architecture, with honor, on the 20th, ult., and is visiting here at present but has taken an office in Emporia, where he will soon be permanently established in business, and where his duties as superintendent of construction of the Maynard school building, above alluded to, will soon begin. ' In justice to him, we must say that the subject of this little piece did not request or suggest the publication' of the article, nor did anyone. Some, of course, would take the position that either an extrordinary. amount of of ' 'good - luck, " or natural ability, or both, alone; accounts for , the brilliant success herein briefly noticed, but such a view of the case is by no means correct. Of native talent Mr. Brink man nas abundance ; so nas many. .other young men, but, who unlike this one, have never usefully earned a dol lar, or made the effort necessary to lift themselves to a useful and honor able position in life, with a settled de termination to find opportunities, and to make the best possible use of them This is what Henry Brinkman has spared no effort to accomplish i the gratifying results are but the natura fruits of simply working out the old motto, "I can and I will." That is why this good example should prove an inspiration to others, and w-e hope it will. v ' gr liooa aaa envelopes, with re turn card printed, 125 for 50, 500 for $1.50, at this office. . 4th '' A ana we ve no time to write ads, "cause 1 we re AT- ed at the carpenter trade, earning the The accompanying picture is printed from a pen drawing by H. W. Brink- man, a junior student in the architecture course. The drawing represents a farm house which the student built last summer from his own plans and spec ifications, for W. Schultz, a farmer near Olpe. It was drawn as a regular class exercise from the floor plans and elevations of the building, with the landscape added from memory. The Industrialist, (Manhattan, Dec. 11, 05) GELEBR 'V:';INO? "Restau- F. A. "Wieland, rietor. Prop Frank Wieland' s new ad is Mrs. J. B. Chamberlain and daugh ter were callers at this office mondav. J. H- Bangs transacted insurance business at this office week. the last of the W. A. Bassett and W. H. Vansick- le and family drove to Emporia this morning. Mr. arid Mrs. J. W. Barkley, of Al bany, Missouri, parents of Mrs. Dr. Patton, are here for a month's yisit. They are accompanied by two daughters. ... .... A large swarm of bees has taken up its abode lust inside the weather boards on the front side of the J. H. Winter residence. The, bees . act a much at home as if they owned the whole premises. Theo. Voeste has sold for Houghton Bros., the southwest, i and west J of lie southeast iof section 2S; 21; 12, to F. J. Cline, Chillicothe. Missouri. Mr. Cline will move here in the fall. The consideration was $5,480. if Miss Louise Brinkman, accomua-f nied by. her sister Fredericka, who will meet her at Newton, will "leave-Monday for a pleasure trip in Colora do, going first tti Denver for a Visit with their brother. Theoclorv. . 1 ,

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