The Logansport Press from Logansport, Indiana on October 29, 1957 · Page 14
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The Logansport Press from Logansport, Indiana · Page 14

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Logansport, Indiana
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Tuesday, October 29, 1957
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PAGE TWO THE LOGANSPORT PRESS, LOGANbPOBT, INDIANA TUESDAY, OCTOBER 29,19ST THOUGHTS . . . Herein is love, not that'we loved God, but "that he loved us, and ser-.t his Son to be the propitiation for our sins.—I John 4:10. To love as Christ loves is to let our love be a practical and not a sentimental thing. —Sir Charles V. Stanford. Editorial Comment- E. Sokolsky These Days THE BABY BOOM "Tighten My Belt?—What Belt?" Ike And His Party The baby boom worries school „• boards.population experts and budget-makers because they realize that the cost of schooling is to in- Few if any national observers e:cpe'ct that President crease and the taxpayer is already Eisenhower will have much luck putting his stamp complaining about too high taxes./ upon the. Republican party in the little more than three The _ colleges are faced by an ex- . ye P ars remaiSng in hfs second admimstration. '^STSE noSM Though the wish to implant that image was given academic ^^ ^ no by his intimates as one of the prime reasons he chose dty for learning but who go be _ to run again, it has been a foregone conclusion for some Cause % ^ fashionable. time that this would not happen. The sc^is and colleges are Political analysts trying to figure out why this has si^jy being corrupted by the pres- not occurred, and probably will not, seem to think ence O f backward students who that the President's' political personality has a lot to bring down the standards unless do with it. • there is firm resistance to them, With rare exceptions he does not resort to forcing a resistance which becomes dif- a situation. He likes the technipue of persuasion. The ^cult in some tax-supported uni- trouble is that a good many politicians have to be verities. On the other hand, driven not, perked So &," President^ "gentle SXSC'^efS touch" hasn't made much of a dent in his party. become what - s ca]led juvenile de _ But there is another side to it. Admittedly, most ]i nquen ts, not because they are of the positions of minority power in Congress are held ,bad but because they need an out- by conservative, non-Eisenhower Republicans. Yet from let for their energies. The class- the very start of the President's tenure the party men room is not such an outlet, as they of his own persuasion have been, for the most part, dislike classes, teachers, books and peculiarly ineffectual. s ^ a ™™ d - These young peo- They could not wrest power from the well-en- Pk want and need action/ trenched conservatives. But there was no latch on their THEREFORE, our 'employment tongues. They could have spoken out forcefully again .theories have to be revised. as the and again for their brand of Republicanism. Generally population increases. It will have, they did not. to GO™ && young people will be No one can say, naturally, that even if they had employable at a much earlier age kept up a steady barrage in the President's behalf he «** are today. Certainly .18 wo^necessariry haveUe seriously close to stamping his mark upon the GOP. sc]MM)1 and boofcs md has Historians measuring this aspect of Mr. Eisenhow- for learn ^ g _ M Uch schaoi space er's presidency are likely to conclude, however, that the ^ was ted on such students. Republican party was not shaped to his image in this According to "Population Bulle- era ' because • neither he nor his chief supporters in tin," the present baby boom is due Congress tried hard enough. partly fco the increase in marriages Political parties in this country are big, tough, during and following World War Westbrook Pegler Fair Enough MIDLAND, TEX — There is a sign on a door in Midland's Ihicket of new office buildings, the headquarters of the great" oil and gas booni The sign says: "Robert Stripling. Oil." Mr. Stripling is one of your quiet Texans. He still Richard. Nixon, vice To err is human unless you car*'; think of some better excuse. into the night when the vice president, was a congressman and Bob •was- chief investigator of the House Committee on Un-American needed ' B ° b as °' Sin f s V the New York Considme. said: Activities: Political legend has it that Nixon turned up the pump- Journalist On a letterhead em kin papers and thus, ultimately, f d ^ " Robert sent Alger Hiss to prison. Actually, Striding did the job long after Nixon had written off ''Your letterhead reminds me of Whittaker Chambers as a melan- Bother one. It reads, Father Di- choly freak \inworthy of .belief vmQ ' He worked around the clock earning the gratitude .of a nation, which nevertJieless ignored him at best DISCARDS HALT BUT IT MIGHT HAVE been END-PLAY PLAN worse. Parnell Thomas, a Republican from New Jersey, went to prison for a kickback which had been familiar routine in Congress The 'two-no-trump opening bid for many years. And only a year is so standard today that in a re- ago, political • enemies tried to cent duplicate, every' South played scratch Nixon because he ex- opened two no-trump- and every posed traitors who had influential North .raised him to three. . friends in New York. Two years, 'west opened the jack of spade« ago, the late Joe McCarthy revealed that a red scientist had retarded this country's satellite .and missile programs to "demonstrate good will" to ,the world. Russia thus beat us to the punch. But BY OSWALD JACOBY Written for NEA Service declarer won in his own . country, will have to be re- complex and sprawling organizations. Like anything II, the postponed marriages dur- s t u< jied. The question win arise big, they have a good deal of inertia and resistance to ing the depression and the early ^ ere> ^ it has in so many older change. Soft talk and silence do not seem well designed war years. Also -economic condi- c&UlI1 t r i eSi as to what is the rnaxi- to override these obstacles. ^ ^ the war were fewrable mum p0(plllatk)n for the United But those have been the devices of the • President *> havm S j™ 5 • Particularly states on our sta ndard of living. *** and the Eisenhower Republicans. In the meantime, giving a lesson, the party conservatives .have been neither- bashful nor silent in exercismg and maintaining ures _ ^ you , t . h assamfs no re . -the power they hold within the GOP fold. And today sensibilities, he marries fearless- their position is largely intact. ly, not like his parents who wor- merrr m ° re to J 00 ' 000 ' 000 ™"* " "" So They ried whether they could earn a - othera insist that there evidence that water and as was called in their S(>m€ othgr naifcural resources aire generation. Today if he cannot receding ^ bhjs can affect the get a job, she can, and does it stalldard of u^g mO re than any -Milovan Djilas, former vipe president of Yugoslavia. JB, r~ OF «The Democratic party will sweep the country in -JJJ** ^ Q i^fanSi^ra on 1958 and 1960. ^fecSe. ^The annual" rate' for immigration issues? —Harry S. Truman, $fcd. births in 1940-41 was 1.8 (per * * * 100 married women under age 45.) I can only say that I deeply regret my past and the This rose to 3.1 in the 1954-55 p.e- crimes I committed against the country which gave me riod, and according to "Population refuge. • Bulletin," the "rate for fourth —Confessed Soviet spy Jack Soble, 55, to federal judge birt2ls increased 70 per cent dur- in New York. * * * All is not well with the small businessman. —Sen. George Smathers (D-Fla.) this period.". It used to be that students at college were required to be unmarried. Generally speaking, there is no such requirement for -,'._" ' T either males or females currently, That gadget (Soviet Sputnik) spinning over my which means tot marriages need head doesn't worry me too much. It's when I see the mat be postponed until the family man in charge with a glass of vodka in his hand that has a breadwinner. .This is par- I get concerned. ticularry true of 'the large num- —Rev. John D. Erb of Boston's; Copley Methodist ber of ^^ who ^ **_• I -. Bi ? Church of Rights benefits and who lived * * * on college campuses or nearby, mi _ -i /-« t i_ j.1 • i 1-1 , . often in Quonset huts, while they Though God hath raised me high, yet this I count studied . Th , is d^ge in the re-g- the glory of my crown, that I have reigned with your uiatitons of many colleges, of •loves, course, means that some students —Elizabeth II quoting the first Elizabeth to Canadians, will marry out-of-turn,' unable to support their families, and limiting them selves to ambitionless but secure lives, depending upon "fringe benefits" and pensions to Interpreting The News By J. M. ROBERTS (Nikita Khrushchev is getting.to of which the i mm NORTH WEST VK73 • Q8 *Q982 V104 • 10 9 B-&2 4543 , EAST J 8 6 5 2 SOtJTH (»» VAQ9 No one vulnerable Sooth West North East 2N.T. Pass 3.N.T. Pass Pass Pass Opening lead—4 •* Carnival President Ike was Joe's. principal tormentor, so malicious ' that he omitted only McCarthy and Mrs. McCarthy from a paltry, canape rout for Congress at the White House., But this is not a sad sfcory. FOR BOB STRIPLING came home to Texas and put down his roots in Midland where the wonderful boom was gathering power. Now he and his beautiful and utterly devoted Essie seem to have it made. They have a lovely home, one of the oldest in town, on an old street, as distinguished down from the breath- splendor and cost of some of the new homes in the new streets, hand and immediabely played the They are "prominent" in the king of diamonds. This play in- pleasant manner of , successful sured three odd against any nor- Americans and their daughter, mal diamond break but most Bunny, the baby- whose mother declarerers had no trouble making had to help the janitor as part- an overtrick. payment of the rent in Washington . Invariably, East allowed the when Bob was dragooned into the king of diamonds, to hold and army for revenge, is now a fresh- West would win the second dia- man at Wellesley. Already she is mend and, continue the spades, covered with scholastic honors South would win with the .queen won at prep school.- and lead another, diamond. East. ,, would win that third diamond and THE CHILD HARDLY could ^ ^ ^ apade; Qn fte ^ have known the hurt which her m<md lead West would discard . a parents were put to after Bob's club opposition to a commission in Now g^ would ^ - m dummy Naval Intelligence for Eleanor with ae ace of ^^ ^ would Roosevelt's friend, Joe Lash, and oash ^ two good diamonds. He his disclosure that Drew Pear- would discard a ^ c i u j, and » son's leg-man, Dave Katz, late of ^ heapt aod West wou ld drop a the Daily Worker, was high up in heart amd j^t spade, the Office of War Information. South wou i d assume that West Day after day someone phoned let fcat ^ spade go jn or( jer to Stripling's draft board in various guari( j j^ the queen- of clubs names hounding the board to draft - aiK j j-^g $ hearts and therefore Strip and thus eliminate the most would supply take his ace and efficient red-baiter in the. service j^g O f dubs and throw West in of-an infested governemnt. At ^m ^ q ueen whereupon West last, the draft took Stripling and wou i d ^ end-played. ' ' the EARLY STEAMBOAT for an entire, year he was a one West player was made "of Suez crisis,'and revealed herself _ .. . . ... '_ yardbird .picking up: cigarette sterner stuff. He discarded- two hn«»r,h«T . as utterly ruthless in preventing Some historians credit Samuel butts and swabbing latrines. He hearts without any apparent wor- Decommg a ^ wor id-satisfying solution of Morey, Oxford, New Hampshire, did not make P.F.C. in a whole ^ w £ hung onto his best.spade. Eastern European satellite as having built a steamboat on J^- . South .could have simply taken fe energy which the Wast w ^ W am. ___ the Connecticut Eiver M H90. i 7 ^^^T ^ ^^^^^ S. For a while the free world became absorbed in problems of economics, with "I'm not going out on any more double dates—there's always another girt along to spoil things!" xar R ««.- IT IS AN INTERESTING social winning a cold- war. intercontinental ballistics missite MORE REVO LUTIONS' 'tion. Collier's had run with the West'slast spade held declarer to shift- that we are beholding and There was nothing like the sit- as her final sensation, _ -• .. mite EmsQ cabgl a}] &e way / three ^j^-.-for . a - very bad where it will lead to, it is impos- nation after World War II when Taking advantage of develop- The smaller tires on the 14-inch strip told Beck to go to hell, and ec ore for North and South; sible to forecast except to state the West threw down its arms and men ts i n Syria, Khrushchev took wheels of 1957 cars make 773 revo- wa jked orat with, $3.85 in his pock- On life Of Spouse ship of population to resources, in Then Russia started moving into Poland. The West has issued firm wheels. warnings.- -' • His emphasis on Russian, -mill- Smelting a ton of aluminum re- offer by just about half and-gave Bob carte blanche. Screen Actress Answer to Previous Puzzlfc tary strength in connection with quires electrical energy enough LONG AFTERWARD WHEN Sputnik brought 'immediate reac- to supply the needs of an average Senator Jim Eastland inherited GUERNSEY, Channel Islands.» •tion in the West setting off a con- American home for ten years. McCarthy's old committee, he -- - -"-— ™ «« ACROSS 5 Conf ession m R. e . u.s. p«t. OH. (E> 1957 by NEA Sarvie.. Inc. "It's hard to believe that she couldn't even say 'Daddy' until she was almost three years old!" The Logansport Press Established June 14, 1031 Published Dally (except Sunday, Monday and holidays) by <h« PRESS PUBLISHING CO., Inc. Office 517 E. Broadway Entered 4nn« 14, 1021. at the Post Of lice at iiogansport, Indiana. 114 fl«nond cln*H matter-under Act of Congress March 8. 187D. A IteuuMlcan Newspaper AH Phones 4141 MEMBBR OP THE ASSOCIATED PRESS The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the nse for publication of nlJ nt-ws dispatches credited to It or not otherwise credited In paper mid also local nevFs published herein also rererved. HRMUKn OIi THE AUDIT BUREAU OP CIRCULATION Subscription ratest By carrier, S5c per rreek, dally and Sunday payable every Saturday morning, $1S.20 per year. By mall, 910.00 per year in this and adjacent countien $11.00 per year elsewhere In Indiana. Out/side subscriptions $18.00 per year. No mall anbscrlp- tlons sold where carrier service Is maintained. ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES — .WESTERN — — EASTERN — Inland Newspaper 114 • Inland Newspaper Representatives. Inc. __«znT-_ Representatives, Inc. •40-642 Wrigley Building CSS^E^fe;; 41 East 42nd Street ChJcagro, HL KS^Sj^^ge= J u ew York, N, Y. Valerie 7 She hails from 13 Withdraw 14 Small space 15 Click-beetle 16 Gamblers' decoy (slang) 17 Worm 18 Wooden pin 50 Turf 21 Gives 23 Cloy 26 Thoroughfare (ab.) 27 At all times 31 Italian silver coin 82Nostril 33 German river 34 Fillip 35 Head (Fr.) 36 Goddess of infatuation 39 Lampreys 40 Venerates 43 Turkish title of respect 46 Erects 47 Tear 50 Shirt part 52 Dress 54 Least-wild 55 Pesters 56 Writing tablets 57 Take into custody DOWN 1 Unlettered 2 Units of reluctance S Japanese outcasts 4 Louse egg 7 Bootlaces 8 Papal cape 8 Fiber knots • 10 Diarftond- cutter's cups 11 Bread spread 12 Ointment 19 Siamese temple 21 More adored 22 Mental faculties 23 Deer track 24 Military assistant 25 Allowance for waste 28 Weathercock IRlElR Airp« \y\G\sMv\E.\\ : ***^~'' 'IP]E|NI pS|l \T\K\Sm\ 1 1 iKJlfil^klTl \ l< 1 PIS I AIL-1 1 Or Is eiRgi leli iMHMWHIMHH ._MHi 29 Pertaining to an era 30 Ribbed fabrics 36 Wards off 87 Afternoon social event 88 Printing' mistakes 41 Expunge 42 Compound ME\D ii T e c MlpMp E"pli e^aslE RI SlO|0[R|M|Ep ^iTlE^^ll 1 Rj^ T| i l&l |N[II]F E|C|T| IB N «i *+*+*** tmltm^— ether 43 Deeds 44 Purpose .45 Feminine appellation 47 Get up 48 Angers 49 Nuisance 51 Permit '53 Paving substance certed movement for greater cooperation in military science. Now he appears to have removed from Ms path Marshal Zhukov, looked upon by the-West as a -powerful 'moderating force in Kremlin circles. First Khrushchev broke the power of the x old^ secret police, through which opposition to his regime might have been solidified. Now, with air the talk of the necessity of subordinating everything to party political control, he is trying to take over the -army which,' under a popular leader such as Zhukov, might _ have proved another rallying' point .for opposition. Khrushchev is not the one .to have missed'the point when Zhu-. kov saved' him .last, summer in his contest with Molotov and Mal-. enkov. Zhukov had become the second most powerful man in Russia; was dose to par with the party boss.' The initial,speculation that Zhu- kov was being promoted has died-, down. Since Khrushchev long ago demonstrated his domination .of; the premiership, what could Zhu- kov be promoted to? '•;-.The man that is being promoted is the volatile Khrushchev. After her recent interview with,, turn, Bleanor Roosevelt referred to Khrushchev as the* shrewd' ipeasant type. What makes the world itchy -to-, day is its doubt. whether this self- aggrandizing peasant type has a sufficient grasp of world, sit- uafcions to moderate his ambition. Side Glances TJ«.IUg.lfcS.P«t.O«.: £ 19S7 b» KEA S«r»lM. »•«. — Mrs. Kathleen Gleeson, 27, who admitted • trying to kill her husband ,was , set free .yesterday after the husband -testified he never took her out once in their seven years of marriage. Mrs. Gleeson had. pleaded • guilty -to the attempted' murder, charge and told of. crushing more than 70 aspirins Mo -a -custard pudding prepared for her' husband. But the sight of bis suffering, Mrs. Gleeson said, made her change her mic^ and she phoned frantically for a doctor. Gleeson ' testified 'on las wife's behalf. He said he moved into his mother-in - 'law's house seven years ago and never ' took his wife away for a vacation or even out for a night. He said h e would try to be a better' husband, if .he .could • hav« his wife back. The'court agreed to free :Mrs.. Gleeson on thre« years' probation. RAPO) GROWTH Th.e bald eaglet grows almost as heavy as its parents in the first few months of life.. It wears a dark cap, with its white feathers appearing at maturity. VISIBLE" FROM MOON The Great Wall of China, 2,000 miles long, is thought by astronomers to be the only work of man that would be visible,to the naked eye from the moon. "Notice how quiet Professor Crfmsby has been sine* he missed that question on the TV show?" Good customs:. The, Danes lik« to serve celery with cheese, th». English offer watercress.

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