The Baltimore Sun from Baltimore, Maryland on January 17, 1961 · 12
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The Baltimore Sun from Baltimore, Maryland · 12

Publication:
Location:
Baltimore, Maryland
Issue Date:
Tuesday, January 17, 1961
Page:
12
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PACE 12 Tin; SUN. BALTIMORE, TUESDAY MORNING. JANUARY 17. 19G1 D)(o cHn n UjUU p n roia The Sun has now opened a permanent news bureau in New Delhi, the capital of India. It is the paper's fifth foreign bureau and the fourth to be established in less than six years. In the belief that a resurgent Germany would play an ever, more dominant role in the affairs of Europe and might prove the ultimate key to peace or war between East and West, The Sun began operations from Bonn, the capital of West Germany, in February, 1955. Nothing has occurred in the years between to call that belief into question. To provide its readers a more comprehensive news report from the capital of the Communist world, The Sun secured from the Soviet Union permission to establish a permanent bureau in Moscow in January, 1956, At that time the paper was one of only four American newspapers accredited to operate on a permanent basis behind the Iron Curtain. Today it is one of three. The editors were then convinced that keeping first-hand contact with what goes on in the Russian capital was on a par in importance with thorough coverage of Washington -where The Sun has maintained a news bureau for over 118 years. They still are. Sustained tensions in the Near East and North Africa, and the effect these tensions might have on the rest of the Mediterranean region and the entire world, prompted the establishment of a bureau in Rome in July, 1957. Here its personnel would be strategically poised over the m explosive area and from here eruption spots could be. reached in the shortest possible time. In three and a half years the editors have seen no reason to regret their decision. assertions of communistic totalitarianism and the professions of individual freedom, the 390,000,000 people of the sub-continent of India become one of the decisive elements in the second half of the Twentieth Century. So believing, The Sun is undertaking to provide its readers with a first-hand report of that country as the winds of doctrine blow through it. For-that purpose, Philip Potter, war correspondent, long-time staff member of the paper's Washington Bureau, and for years The Sun's principal Far Eastern specialist, has been sent to New Delhi. Although his primary assignment is India and what goes on there, news events will take him from Bangkok to Kabul. Mr. Potter's experience has peculiarly fitted him for At a period when the struggle for men's minds is entering an even more critical phase, when the ideological balance of the Far East appears suspended between the his present assignment. During World War II he served as a war correspondent in the China-India-Burma theater for The Sunpapers. He was present at the signing of the articles of Japanese surrender on the battleship Missouri. He covered the American occupation of Korea and then -returned4o China to report on the activities of the Marshall mission until June 1946, when he returned home to join the Washington Bureau of The Sun. In 1947 he covered the Civil War in Greece, the Arab-Israeli War in Palestine, the Berlin airlift and served as a correspondent in Turkey, Egypt, the Anglo-Egyptian Sudan and Poland. At the outbreak of the Korean War he returned ' there as a correspondent, where he was awarded the Korean War Correspondent Citation. In recent years he has made several trips to the Far and Middfe East for The Sun. Forty years ago, when the late Frank R. Kent es-tablished The Sun's first foreign bureau in London, the world was wider than it is today. It was wide enough to permit narrow news coverage. A narrowing world requires wide news coverage. The Sun intends to provide it. Editorial Offices: BALTIMORE WASHINGTON LONDON BONN o MOSCOW ROME NEW DELHI

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