Naugatuck Daily News from Naugatuck, Connecticut on October 19, 1949 · Page 2
Get access to this page with a Free Trial

Naugatuck Daily News from Naugatuck, Connecticut · Page 2

Publication:
Location:
Naugatuck, Connecticut
Issue Date:
Wednesday, October 19, 1949
Page:
Page 2
Start Free Trial
Cancel

I'AOK 3—XAUGATUCK NKWK (CONN.), WrCDN'ICSDAY, OCT. 10, HMD DREW PEARSON ON WASHINGTON MERRY-GO-ROUND Drew Pearson Says: Navy Propaganda Mill Operates Backstage To Disrupt Unification; Trust-Buster O'Mahoney Swings To Big Business; Basing-Point Bill Favors Wyoming- Company Linked With Cartel. Washington—Last year, the 80th Congress investigated an Army propaganda mill which used taxpayers' money to sell the American public on military conscription: while Senator Byrd of Virginia also criticized any branch of the government that issued a press handout publicizing its operation But today there operates backstage in the Navy, a secret publicity bureau almost solely dedicated to smearing the Army and Air Forces and disrupting unification. The publicity Tjureau is called "Operation 23" and it consists of 12 officers and 17 enlisted men, all on regular duty and officially assigned to this detail. The detail is commanded by a full-Hedged naval captain. Capt. Arliegh Burke, with Commander Thomas Davies second in command. This underground unit takes orders chiefly from Admiral Arthur Radford, outspoken critic of the B-36. Significantly, Operation 23 has been flooding newspapers with anti- Army propaganda at the same -time an official naval board has been investigating another Navy smear —the secret memo which claimed that Secretaires Symington and Johnson ordered the B-36 because of personal monetary gain. This vicious myth, now completely exploded, was written by Cedric Worth, a civilian naval employe— or at least he assumed responsibility. Worth, it now develops, was a part of Operation 23. And eve.n before the board of admirals had finished its probe of the Worth smear, more propaganda began flooding the nevspapers—some of it sent through the medium of Naval Reserve Capt. James Stahlman, publisher of the Nashville (Tenn.) Banner. Note—One member of Operation 23- is Lt. Sam Ingram, a naval reservist. Ingram reported for two weeks' active duty one year ago, wrote Admiral Radford a letter castigating the Air Force, got a ca!l from Radford to drop in for a personal visit. The visit lasted two hours, and Lt. Ingram has been "tin permanent duty turning cut cartoons and charts against the Air Force ever since. His salary for that year of sniping at another branch of the armed services was paid for by the taxpayer. Big Business' New Partner In the battle to restore the bas- :ng-point system. Dig business has had a unique partner—Senator Joe O'Mahoney of Wyoming. the famous trust-buster. ~ No one could believe that O'Mahoney would come out on the side of the big trusts. Hence, many liberals were lulled to sleep by the fact that O'Mahoney introduced the basing point bill. In the eyes of big business, this is the most important bill to come up this session of Congress. For it would amend the anti-trust laws so that the steel industry, for ex- emr>!e. could charge the same price for steel from the blast furnaces of Pittsburgh, Pa., or Geneva, L'tah. This practice of regulating prices by absorbing the shippings costs was outlawed by the Supreme Court, so big business turned to Congress to overrule the court. O'Mahoney made his bill sound so harmless that it almost passed the Senate without an objection. Only at the last minute, Senators Russell Long of Louisiana and Estes Kefauver of Tennessee, both Democrats, caught what was going on. and put up a fight against it. Back in O'Mahoney's trust-busting days, he bitterly criticized the casing-point system as a conspiracy by the trusts to regulate prices. That's the reason his colleagues couldn't understand why he now introduced a bill to restore the bnsing-point system. In fact, because of O'Mahoney's reputation, many senators still believe his bill would encourage instead of stifle competition. What they don't know, however, is that O'Mahoney was sold a bill of goods by the Westvaco Chemical Co, of Westvaco, Wyo. This company has paraded as an independent which riiscoverod large trona deposits in Wyoming and now hopes to build a new chemical business producing soda ash from natural trona. Who's Fooling Whom? The senator from Wyoming wanted to emphasize the independence of the company when he brought Robert D. Pike, an engineer for Westvaco, to Washington to testify. "This is an independent plant, is it not?" O'Mahoney asked about the Wyoming plant. "Yes, sir; entirely so,' nodded Pike. "It is not a subsidiary to any other plant engaged in the same business?" the ex-trust buster brought out again. "No, it is not," replied Pike. "So that if and when established to develop the potentialities of this deposit, it will be an independent competitive enterprise," O'Mahonev added. "That is correct, Senator," agreed Pike. Yet behind the legal red tape, the Westvaco Company is not so independent. For the same record, in which this testimony was printed, Identifies Pike—in fine print- as representng the Westvaco Chemcal Division of the Food Machinery and Chemical Corporation, this turns out to be a Delaware corporation with ^tentacles all around the world. Mixed Up With I. G. Farben It is described in business -directories as "one of the principal producers of industrial chemicals in the United States," and it was involved in court action this year with the international cartel in alkalis On Aug. 12, the mother company was slapped with a court injunction for violating the Sherman Anti-Trust Act through this cartel. Named as co-conspirators were I. G. Farben Co, of Germany, and Solvan Et Cie, of Belgium. The head of the British cartel. Imperial Chemicals Industries, Ltd, of London, was also named as a defendant through its subsidiary, Imperial Chemical Industries, Ltd. of New York. The court charged that the coconspirators had been parties since 1924 to contracts governing- the sale of alkalis in the world market, and that the American cartel members had agreed to prevent other independent American firms from selling alkalis to foreign markets. This agreement was enforced by a policing system by which inspectors on U. S. docks bought up any materials likely to get into the hands of other exporters, it was charged. So it now turns - out that the Westvaco Co., which is shouting its independence, is actually tied to an international cartel. Some senators are now wondering where that leaves Senator Joe O'Mahoney, the great trust buster. Note—Among the affiliates of Wyoming's so-called independent plant are Warner Chemical Co., of New Jersey, Westvaco Chorine Products Corp., of New York and New Jersey, West Virginia Charcoal Co., Barium Products, Ltd., of California, and Monarch Chemicals Co, of New Jersey. Employment Office Schedule Listed, Tuesday, Thursday William Davison of the State Employment Office, Wnterbury, announced today that the Naugatuck branch office of the employment service will open Tuesdays and Thursdays for an indefinite period. He .said that some borough residents believed the change in schedule was a temporary move last week because of the Cojum- bus Day holiday last Wednesday. The borough office will operate from 9 a. m. to 4:30 p. m. each Tuesday and Thursday until further notice, he said, in the Tuttle School. Gear Driven Electric Sewing Machine Equipped with Floating Gib Hook — Stitch Regulator — Forward and Reverse Sewing — Sewing Lamp — Floating Preiser Foot — and many others. New Horn* electric console with Che Myle. quality and finish of the finest furniture. Servo equally well at end table or lamp stand. Cleverly styled portable, with carry. Ing COM of rich brown leatherette. COME IN—LET US SHOW YOU THE MANY FEATURES ON NEW HOME . RADIOS ^APPLIANCES. 15 Church St. 413 No. Main St Naugatuck (Phones 6490—6491) Union City FREE PARKING FOR CUSTOMERS Polio Cases Drop Sharply In Conn. Poliomyelitis cases declined sharply, from -13 to 19 during the past seven day period, according to the summary of reportable diseases issued eac"h week by the state department of health. Cases of this disease were recorded from all but New London county. Broncho pneumonia. cases decreased from 30' to 27, gonorrhea dropped from 32 to 13 cases, syphilis from 21 to 13 cases, chickenpox from 14 to seven, lobar pneumonia from 11 to five, streptococcal sore throat from four to three, and diphtheria cases declined from •two to one during the week just ended. At the same time, German measles cases remained at two, and typhoid fever cases at none. This marked the fifth consecutive week that the state had been without a typhoid case. Whooping cough was the most prevalent , disease witrJn the state last week. There were 61 cases of this disease recorded, in contrast to 45 for the previous period. During the week, mumps cases increased from 28 to 32, measles cases from six to 12, and scarlet fever cases from none to nine. New Haven reported the only case of meningococcal meningitis within the state during the past seven-day period. There -were no cases of this disease a week earlier. Mrs. McKenna's Dad Dies In Waterbury \ John H. Poultcr, 79, of 380 Willow .street, W:iterbai-y, father of Mrs. George McKenna, Naugatuck, died last evening at his home after a lonK Illness. A native o£ Waterbury, he was born March ,16, 1870, the son of the late Henry R. and Margaret (Bteon) Poulter. He wa.3 foreman fur Tracy Brothers until retiring 15 years aijo. He was a member of St. John Episcopal Church, Wa- terbuiy. In addition to Mr.3. McKenna, he Is survived by Hirer sons, another daughter ,a sister, six grndchildren and seven great-grandchildren. Funeral services will ibe held Friday afternoon at 2 o'clock at the Alderson Funeral Home, 70 Central avenue, Waterbury with burial in Old Pino Grove cemetery. Friends may call at the funeral home this evening from 7 to i o'clock and tomorrow laftarnoon and evening from 3 to 5 and from 7 tc 9 o'clock. Gabrielson Attends Springfield Parley Eric G. Gabrielson of Naugatuck, reasurer of the Waterbury chapter of the National Association of Cost Accountants, and employe of the Bristol Co., was among those attending the New England Cost conference held in Springfield, Mass., during the past weekend. Thomaa E. McLaughlln, Water- jury chapter president, addressed the officers and directors of the participating New England chap:era, and spoke om chapter publicity. CARDINALS Rome — Vatican sources say that Pope Pius may create six new cardinals early in, December including one American. Foremost American candidates are believed to be Archbishop Cashing of Boston and Archbishop McNicholas of Cincinnati. TIMBER FOR MATCHES About 82 million board feet of timber is used each year in making matches. Realty Transactions The following documents have been filed in the office of Town Clerk Raymond J. St. John: Warranty Deed Walter C.. and Lillian Hoffman to Harry E,, and Elizabeth "P. Smithausler, property off Shirley street. Quit Claim Deed Catherine Bowles to A. Frank Bowles, . property on New Haven rtoad. Mortgage Deed Catherine H., and A. Prank Bowles to the Providence Association of the Ukrainian Catholics in America, Philadelphia, Pa., $20,000 on New Haven road property. Mechanics Lien Beleanes Ciriello Construction Co., to Catherine H., and Dr. Frank Bowles. Shalen and Konover, Inc., to Catherine Bowles. COMBINATION ALUMINUM STORM WINDOWS * DOORS NEW ENGLAND SALES CO ALSCO 282 Bank St., Waterbnry Phone 4-9219 BUCKMILLER Funeral Home 22 PARK PLACE Telephone 4334 wonderful "HEARTBEAT 1 Interpreting the Parisian iiifluene.e. in this exeithifr, new version ol' your favorite day 'n' Jii^ht-time classic . . . gently rolls a nattering foliar, sweeps a deep sleeve gracefully full, and adds a port, st.itclH'd liiif'f. Break Ground Friday For Housing Project East Hartford, Oct. 19—(UP)— Governor Bowles will officially break ground for East Hartford's new 80-unit Veterans Housing project. The special ceremony for the $800,000 project will take place on Friday. The development is expected tp be completed within three months. Rentals will average from $42 to $49 a month. War Mothers Install Officers Friday Mrs. Frank Clark will be installed as president of the newly organized Aimerican Wai 1 Mothers chapter at ceremonies to be conducted Friday Averting at 8 o'clock in the Knights of Columbus rooms, Ncary buidding. Other officers also will be installed at the meeting. AH interested residents are invited to attend. Last evening Mr. and Mrs. Clark attended the Installation of officers of the Earl H. Chamberlain detachment and auxiliary, Marine Corps League, in New Haven. RETURNS SHIPS Yokoituka, Japan—RuttHla has returned 9 fleet of nine naval frigate* to the United States In a formal transfer at YokosuJtu, Japan. SCULLY, Florist Rowers for Every Occasion 410 BALDWIN ST. Waterl.-nry LEO T. SCVTLZ.Y, Prop. PHONE WAT. 5-7280 What Our fradeu 7ki*k Naugutuck Daily News, Naugatuek, Conn. Gentlemen:— Please accept my thanks for the hearty support and cooperation given me by your staff, during the recent Diabetic Detection Week Drive. As you know this thing could not have been brought to the attention of the public without your aid. The .success of the drive was beyond anything I had 1 expected. So again thanking you, I beg to remain, Very truly yours, Dr. William E. Hill, Chairman, New Haven County. FLOWERS For A BXOWEBS TKLEOBAFHKD EVKBYWUEBK MELBOURNE'S FLOWER SHOP t UO KCBBEB AVJBNTJB FINED 124 Frank Birch, 18, Pond Hill road, was fined $24 when he &pf*ttr*4 before Judge John A. Mcmbrino in Waterbury Oily Court yesterday on a charge of speeding- The case of Lee Gucciardi, 24. of 79 Woodbine street, also charged with speeding, was continued to Nov. 1. 90 Years ol Proof For over 90 year* Father John's Medicine has been used for bronchial irritations and coughs due to colds because of its soothing effect. Contains no harmful drugs. In fine rayon gabardine. Choose it in green, taupe, terra cotta, or camel tan. Sizes 9 to 17. 12.95 Ill I! S I I 1 umumi 33-35 EAST MAIN ST. WATERBURY A 10O-WATT UOHT BULB FREE! With Each Handy Lamp Kit You Buy At light bulb cfoofa* and of our store-NOW! THE HANDY LAMP KIT i» a packaged asiortment of six popular-size household light bulbs — four 60-watt, one 100-wart, one 150- watt and one lOO-watt free — seven bulbs in all FOR ONLY 95* (tax Included) FILL EMPTY SOCKETS NOW I Empty light socket! ate useless sockets and wrong size bulbs mean poor lighting and eyes train. Make it aihabit to keep ill sockets filled with the right size' bulbs. Always have a supply of assorted (resh bulbs on hand to it- i place "burn-outs" when they occur. $ Check over the lighting in your home tonight. Look especially for old black* encd bulbs that cheat you out of light and money. Look for empty sockets that have long since needed the right size bulbs. And while this sale is on, stock up with fresh new bulbs at worth-while savings. USE THIS-COUPON FOR YOUR FREE BULB Print your name andaddrnt, cut out coupon at dotted tin* and take it to any cooperating dealer located in the aroa» terved by Tt» Con- nacticut light and Power Company or to any of our ktorei. * COUPON * FOR QNE EXTRA 100-WATT ELECTRIC LIGHT BULB This Coupon, properly filled in with the customer'* name and addm*. it redeemable under the terms stated herewith for one 100-w»tt electric light bulb upon the purchase of one "Handy Lamp Kit" — a packaged •Mortmcot of six popular household bulbs. Qttly r»si4*ntial electric customers ol The Connecticut Light and Power Company are eligible and potent in must b* made in the stores of regular light bulb dealers located in the areas served by The Connecticut Light and Power Company or in the stores of The Connecticut Light and Power Company. This offer is in effect during the period beginning October 3, 1949 and ending November 5, 1949. THE EXTRA 100-WATT BULB IS PACKED IN THE HANDY LAMP KIT Customer's Nairn , Mat) .City or town. Eyesight if Price/ess — Good Lighting Is Cheap! THECONNECTIGU IQHT & POWER CO, A Butiness-Managed, Tax-Paying Company

What members have found on this page

Get access to Newspapers.com

  • The largest online newspaper archive
  • 8,800+ newspapers from the 1700s–2000s
  • Millions of additional pages added every month

Try it free