Naugatuck Daily News from Naugatuck, Connecticut on October 6, 1949 · Page 7
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Naugatuck Daily News from Naugatuck, Connecticut · Page 7

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Naugatuck, Connecticut
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Thursday, October 6, 1949
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Page 7
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AnsoniaNurseReteives Award i ARRIVES AT A. F. OF i. CONVENTION For Proficiency In Nursing Presentation Made At Annual Nurses' Assn. Dinner artford, Oct. 6—Mary Kiely. R. y.. of 25 Garden street, Ansonia. was presented the Linda Richards Achievement Award for proficiency In nunrinjr last nlprht ut tho annual dinner of the Connecticut Stair Nurses' Association. Given in connection with the Diamond Jubilee of Nursing observance, the award was made on the basis of achievement scholarship, appearance, personality, lead* ershjc, aptitude for nut'ring and devotion to duty. Miss Kiely was graduated from the Hospital of St. Raphael School of Nursing in New Haven, in June, 1948 and became registered in Connecticut the following: October. She was educated in. St. Mary's grammar school. Derby, and Derby Hig-h School. Following her graduation from high school in 1945 she entered. St. , Raiphael's (HcBpitaJ School of Nursing. In her application for admission to the Nursing School Miss Kiely stated that her purpose in choosing nursing as a career was because "I consider it a necessity to the well-being- of our country. At the present time there is great need for well prepared nurses both in military and civilian life. I feel that being a nurse is the best gift 1 can offer this world." The officials at St Raphael's describe Miss Kiely as "an excellent all-around student in both theory' and clinical practice. She was always thoroughly interested in her patients: a good organizer who used excellent judgment and initiative. Her manner has always been quiet and pleasant and her attitude toward and approach to patients, kind, quietly pleasant and considerate." Miss Kiely's classmates have an irr.ipli^it regard for her ability and competency as a bedside nurse. In a recent personal interview Miss Kiely I'aid, "I am only interested in bedside nursing. I view further advancement for myself in higher education only as a better and more widely adaptable equip- I ment for mirsing at the bedside." She added that she sincerely believer "there is something deeply Christian in nursinp at a bedside." In her work, manner and speech i the Linda Richards Award winner I shows that she is trying to maintain I the simple dignity and charity of the nursing arts. The officiate of her nursing school state that Miss Kiely has realized in a concrete manner the inherent, essential traits and tfte fundamental ideals necessary in the care of the isick. BEST SHOE VALUES WORK SHOES Composition and Leather Soles $5.95 COMBAT BOOTS $5.95 up MEN'S DRESS OXFORDS Brown, Black $6.95 up BOYS' DRESS OXFORDS Brown, Black $4.75 up CHESTER'S ARMY & NAVY SURPLUS STORE 24 SOUTH MAIN STREET Nangatuck Phone 6919 OPEN DAItV 9—« — FRIDAY NIGHT TILL 9 P. M. ARRIVING FROM EUROPE to attend the American Federation ol Lab* convention in St. Paul, Minn., Irving Brown (left), European repre- lentative, is greeted by David Dubinsky, head of the International Ladies Garment Workers Union and A. F. of L. vice-president. Brown addressed fij»j delegates on foreign conditions. " I International) NEW JUSTICE VISITS HISTORIC SITE State Employment Picture Brighter Again This Week The number 'of jobless claimants for unemployment benefits in Connecticut declined to 49,367 during the week ended Oct. 1 from 53,585 for the previous week. A year ago, there .were 24,489 filing during the corresponding week. The number of claimants reached i low of 21.485 during mid-October, 11)18. rlslftg steadily to u peak of 98,280 during mid-July, 1949. Since then, the claim load has declined almost every week. World War II veterans still filing under the sharply curtailed Servicemen's Readjustment Law numbered 1,488. Bridgeport still led the state in jobless claimants with 10,060 followed by Hartford 5,886, New Ha•en 5,658. Waterbury 5,421 and New Britain 4,057. The other 14 offices were each under 2,800. Initial claims, which represent new unemployment, rose slightly to 4,092 for the week from 4,025 for the previous week. Of this total, 104 were under the curtailed GI law. A year ago there were 2,793-initial claims of which 622 were un- lor the GI law. Hirings were reported in the following industries: silverware 150, bearings 130, brass goods 40, rubber goods 30, timepieces 25 and rainwear 20. The following layoffs were reported: dresses 100, electrical appliances 80'for one week, rayon 35, Industrial equipment 30, engines 30 week-on week-off, hats 20, bearings 20. small offide equipment 20 and a fo-jndry 20 week-on week-ofr. By Area In the Bristol area, a timepiece manufacturer rehired 25 and a bearings company hired 30. i A Danbury hat firm laid off 20. The Hartford office reported lay- I of fit of/ SB by a rayon concern and 30 by a manufacturer of induu- t.rial equipment. In tho Merlden area, a bearings plant rchjred 105 and a silverware firm rehircd 150. A Mlddletown dress shop laid off 100 due to seasonal conditions. A New Britain bearings factory laid off 20. In the Norwalk area, a manufacturer of small office equipment laid off 25. 'A Stamford engine company put 30 on a week-on week-off schedule. The Torrington office reported a one week inventory, layoff of 80 by an electrical appliance firm. A Waterbury foundry placed 20 on a wook-on week-off schedule. Layoffs totaling 20 by retail stores were'also noted. A rainwear shop rehired 20, a rubber goods concern 30, and a brass goods mill 40. NADQATUCK MTW8 (OONN.), THURSDAY, OCT. 8. 1M»—PAGE 1 RUBBER GOODS More than' 50,000 .different products are made from rubber. PLASTICS USED Some 25 million pounds of plastics are used annually in the manu- .facture of refrigerators. White Elephant Sale Arranged By % Grange Juveniles Articles for a white elephant booth to be conducted by the Juveniles, under the direction of Mrs. Anthony Brodeur, at the annual Beacon Valley Grange fair Oct. 13, 14 and 15, are to be taken to tomorrow night'» meeting of the Grange at 8 o'clock In the Grange HalL Mrs. Jennie Johnson, ticket chairman, requests that all ticket returns for the turkey supper to be served at the fair be made tomorrow night. The evening's program will be in charge of the third and fourth degree teams. Tonight a bingo party will be held at the hall at 8:15 o'clock. Hospital, Nurses Associations Have Revised Policies Hartford, Oct. 6 — (U P) — The boards of the Connecticut Hospital association and Connecticut State Nurses association have adopted a revfsed set of policies on salaries and other benefits for nurses. The associations propone that voluntary general hospitals pay staff nurses a starting salary of $2,280 a year. The maximum would be $2,640. The associations also favor a contributory pension plan, a 40-hour work week, night differential pay and other conditions covering holi- j days, vacations, health service and I living accommodations. I It will be up to the Individual I hospitals when to put the new recommendations into effect. YOVE BEEN CARRYlNT FOR YEAR5- PINE POPULAR Memphis—Southern pine is on* of the most sought-after woods. It is used for wire service poles- railroad cross-ties, pulpwood, piling or fuel. HAKDRN CORN MUFFIN MIX DRESSES UP MEALS Serve your guests corn muffin* you'll be proud o£ Flakorn hat the quality no other coca muffin mix has been able to equal. And the ingredients are precision- mixed for sure results. Just add an egg and milk. FOLLOWING CONFIRMATION of his nomination to the Supreme Court, Federal Judge Sherman Minton (right), of Indiana, visits the historic room in Washington where the high tribunal held its first meetings. A plaque, telling of this event, is shown him by Sen. Scott W. Lucas (D~I11.). Judge Minton was confirmed by a. 48-16 Senate vote. (International). Original Columbus Wrong Way Corrigan Christopher Columbus was "the wrong way Corrigan" of the 15th Century. . _ Columbus sailed for the-Orient in m ~de"his historic''landtag" on' Oct te wrong direction because ne 12 H92 He thouRht he was .. some . reality, the westward trip to Asia from Europe in the days before the Panama Canal, was about 24,000 miies around Cape Horn and then northwest through southern Pacific waters. En route to what he believed to be the Orient, Columbus literally "bumped into" an island in the Bahamas, off of Florida, where he the was unaware that North and South America and the Pacific Ocean lay beyond the western shores of tho Atlantic. In estimating- the distance from Spain, westward across the Atlantic to Asia, he visualized a single, unbroken expanse of water. This made him think the Portuguese •seamen of his day were foolish for trying to get to the Orient by going south around Africa and then east, a distance of more than 12,000 miles. If Columbus' calculations had been correct, he would have reached Japan after sailing westward from Spain for less than 5,000' miles. In where on a small island near Japan or China." The great navigat- ^ or and seaman did not realize that he had discovered "the new world' until nearly six years later. DAIRYING BEGINS First U. S. cows were brought to Jamestown colony in 1611. The MUSIC SHOP .. . when you think of gifts, think of music . , . everything musical. 88 Church St: Phone 6287 Guess which 5 -letter word means... IALLAN ,.. it always means PU • The word is steer! Right you are! You drive a steer with a whip . .. you steer to "drive a ship." It's plain to see, steer is one of those confusing words that can keep you guessing. But no guessing about Ballantine! Ballantine always means PURITY, BODY, FLAVOR ... the qualities symbolized by Peter Ballantine's 3-ring trade mark. Look for the 3 rings; call for Ballantine— America's finest since 1840. ® Ask the man for Ballantine Ale ® Beer P. Ballantine & Sona, Newark, N. J. Visit The New FAIRMONT HOUSE A 'COMPLETELY NEW FURNISHED AND DECORATED FIVE ROOM COTTAGE ON OUR THIRD FLOOR Open For Inspection Daily or Any Evening- By Appointment WHETHER YOU WISH TO FURNISH ONE ROOM OR FIVE, A VISIT TO THE FAIRMONT HOUSE WILL HELP YOU SOLVE YOUR DECORATING PROBLEMS. The unusual number of alternate and optional furnishings that comprise the. complete Fairmont House offers amazing flexi- , bility in arrangements so that the over-all theme can be diireetly transferred to your home regardless of its size-or lay-out. You wilt also- see many grand new ideas in color schemes, floor coverings and accessories and, best of all . . . you'll be deligjitedi at the modest budget prices for such fine quality furniture.• Open Thursday Evening Until 8:45 P. M. • IN C OR P O R A T E O 91-99 W^EST'MAIN STREET WATERBURY

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