The Winnipeg Tribune from Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada on March 31, 1947 · Page 5
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The Winnipeg Tribune from Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada · Page 5

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Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
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Monday, March 31, 1947
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Page 5
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MONDAY, MARCH 31. 1947 YOGI SURVIVES DAY IN AIRTIGHT PIT BOMBAY, March 31 (Reuters) After spending 24 hours buried PH. 95 650 'i ' i .. i Hon. Dr. H. A. Bruce who ha been elected a Director of the Crown Life Insurance Company. Dr. Bruce has had a distinguished career as a surgeon, and is Professor Emeritus of nurgery. University of Toronto. He has been active in puMIc affairs and was Lieutenant Governor of Ontario from 1932 to 1937. MITCHELL - C0PP LTD. Prts am4 Hargriva Hours, 9 - 6 Wed., 9 - 1 See HOUSEHOLD FINANCE You may borrow from $20 to $1000 without endorsers at Household Finance, and you may take 12 or IS snonthi to repay. Or even 20 or 24 anonthi on loans of larger amounts. Household loans arc arranged promptly, with no delay. Just decide how much money you need and how long you want to take to repay. Phone first, then come in. Your money can be ready the tarn day you apply. ' Tin Wmnm$ IrMMt Uyi IMs JM Ferteee . Hum 7 - 477 ttl tateee at fart Phew s - 244 tan t H$mbr "' aatn rr e nut a immncf alive In airtight concrete pit, Shri Roman and Swami, a Yogi (holy man) from the Himalayas, Sunday nijfht was lifted out and shown to the 50,000 people who had gathered to see tl.e end of the demonstration. The Yogi went into a sham - adhi (Yogi trance) Saturday night when he was placed in the pit, which was then sealed with concrete. When the pit was uncovered, the Yogi released himself from his trance and opened his eyes a few minutes after being lifted out. Then, smiling faintly, he broke his fast witn a glass of lime juice. The demonstration was twice postponed. Eight days ago when he was about to begin his trance. 5.000 almost demolished the platform. The Yogi fled by car and the organizers said he was "disturbed in mind by tl.e unruly crowd,'' and unable to continue. There was a second postponement last Sunday. C.P.R. Express Honors H. Y. Knox H. Y. Knox, general superintend. ent of the Canadian Pacific Ex press company for western lines, wag honored on his retirement after 46 years with the company. at a dinner held in the Royal Alex andra hotel Friday. Employes of the express and railway attended Tribute to Mr. Knox's "long and efficient service" was made by J E. Coulter, president of, the com pany, who arrived from Montreal for the occasion, J. W. Dow, gen' eral agent at Winnipeg, presided at the dinner, Mr. Knox was presented with a lounge chair on behalf of the company. The presentation was made by J. A. Walford, successor to Mr. Knox. Others who spoke Included: N. R. DesBrlsay, C.P.R. assistant passenger traffic manager; H.A.V. Green, C.P.R. solicitor; I.A. Wilson, express agent at Kenora. J. Bruce Hapgart, express agent at Vancou ver; W. T. Beaven, express superintendent of the Pacific division; W. Kelly, vice - president of the Brotherhood of Express Employes, who made a gift of money on be half of the Moose Jaw and Regina employes; H. E. Cann, express agent at Winnipeg; and C. D. Grigg, superintendent of Western division. St. Boniface Kiwanis Ladies to Hold Meeting The monthly meeting of the ladies' auxiliary of the Kiwanis Club of St. Boniface will be held at 12.30 p.m. Thursday in the Georgian room of the Hudson's Bay store. Guest speaker will be Don H. Murdoch, trustee of Kiwanis International. His topic will be Kiwanis In Action. Tooisht take aU - varatablo NR Uxatire. It nP cimr out tnoroiiKhly and pliaioily btmtiul wairtaa, often th caiai of headaches, dull feaunc. tvtakea you teal brighter. NH comxa ui two strength. RueuUr NR and NR Junior (H doer). TaJTX - - Plain or chocolate coated. IMeJIM.ll io tOMoaap AiftiOMT 25 SIZES I i . ... . ' V ... J', - I I I I VIMY SPEAKER Maior Cen. P. I spectators stampeded and MontagJb wiy be the guest speaker at the annual Vimy Day dinner to be i held at the Royal Alexandra hotel ! Friday at 6.45 p.m. The event is sponsored by Valour Road Memorial Branch, Canadian Legion, and General Montague is expected to deal with Canada's pait in World War Two and with aspects of the international situation, judge Montague was the first Canadian soldier to step ashore in Great Britain during World War Two and was there and in Europe, throughout hostilities. All members of all the armed and auxiliary forces of both great wars are eligible to attend. Ukrainian Parish Subscribes $16,000 For New Church The Ukrainian Greek Catholic parish of St. Vladimir and Olga will begin construction of a new church on the site of the present church this summer, it was decided at a special meeting. The campaign for funds was opened by Rev. Fr. Dr. B. Kueh - nir, parish priest, and $16,000 was subscribed at the meeting. It was unanimously decided to add another word to the name of the parish which will now read: The Ukrainian Greek Catholic Confraternity Church of St. Vladimir and Olga. Plans for the new church prepared by J. N. Semmens, were unanimously approved. They call for a building 2U0 feet by 60 feet high, excluding the roof. Steel, stone and brick will create a church similar in front appearance to St. Boniface Cathedral and there will be no supporting pillars In the interior. It is expected the work will be finished by the winter of 1949. Frenchmen Duel, No One Injured PARIS, March 31 (CP) Using classic muzzle - loading pistols, Gas ton Deferre, former French cabinet minister, and Paul Bastid, news paper executive, fought a duel Sat urday in the woods of a castle out side Paris. Two shots were fired without result. The opponents were not reconciled. It was the first known duel in France since 1938. Deferre, Socialist, and Baslld, radical - Socialist, are deputies in the National Assembly. The duel challenge was Issued after a scuffle between the two Friday. One newspaper description oi Fridays Assembly scene quoted Deferre as shouting: "Name your seconds a"d I will let you have four bullets in the gizzard." 5 : r - " riBe, J' DU - VAL accessory set A triumph of a tram - up treatment that males llio simplest outfit look new and distinctive. Matching handbag and belt of polished aniline leather in a deep, rich Havana Brown shade. The handbag is a smoothie . . ; a classicly simple envelope style with adjustable over - the - shoulder; ovrr - the - arm strap. The trim, waist - whittling polo belt offers a choice of widths with either two or three buckles. Both handbag and belt are sturdily fashioned, saddle - stitched for added smartness. And the price of this Du - Val Accessory Set? But moderate. YOUI ASSUIARCE Of QUALITY STYU AND VAIUI MM H OAWU MOOUCrj, dMetea e DVAsU AsSOCIATfB CO AMM UMITIB, Tern, Coeeaa otW OU - VAI precucft: rw'nweor, sportswear, coma war and vmhrlla$ SOLD IT IIADINO STORIS TNROUONOUT CANADA THE WINNIPEG TRIBUNE PAGE S B Writer Charges Chinese Terror Rule in Formosa SHANGHAI, March 31 (AP) John W. Powell, editor of the magazine China Weekly Review, charged today that Formosa's governor - general, Chen Yi, has "coupled trickery !vith a reign of terror prole ably not equalled in China in the history of the Kuoinin - "'tang (governing party)" to "virtually suppress the Formosa revolution." Powell said disturbances are con - tinuing only in the more remote sections, but that, by conservative estimates, 5,000 Formosans already are listed as dead and thousands have been Imprisoned. The Central Newt agency official government organ previously termed the Formotan disorders open and widespread rebellion. No comment on Powell's report was forthcoming from government sources. "When Interviewed about these events, Governor Chen Yl deprecated the whole affair, saying... it would never have become at all serious if he had just had troops on hand. lie also blamed the Communists," Powell's report said. All foreigners I talked with stated err.pftitica!!? that there were no signs of any Communist activity." The uprising which began last Feb. 28, Powell said, followed "a year and a half of flagrant misrule," ho said with government troop. perpetrating "some of the most unimaginable atrocities." By March 1, he related, rioting had spread to most of the cities of the island, and many were in the hands of the Formosans. Powell said a truce was arranged with a committee of prominent Formosans which had been formed to campaign for political and eco - l nomic reforms. He added that the governor at first negotiated, but when troops arrived from the mainland March 8 the committee was ...Tested. Robert H. Smith School Cadet Corps Inspected The Robert H. Smith cadet corps was inspected Thursday by its sponsoring committee, under Col. L. F. Pearce, chairman. During the Inspection, the corps was in charge of: Cadet Capt. John Phin, cadet officer commanding; Cadet Lt. William Carter; Cadet C - S.M. Deane Hilbman; and Cadet Sgt. Mac Prope. The O.C.R.A. competition of mirkimanthlp averages for January, February and March was won by Cadet Lance Corporal John Kell with 94', percent. Other medal winner were Cadet LCorp. Graham Dowler, 94; Cadet LCorp. Barry lliffe, 93; and Cadet Corp. William Searle, 9S. Cadet LCorp. Graham Dowler won the Fraser Cup and Shooting Trophy with 99 13 percent. First aid certificates were awarded to most of the cadets. The highest marks went to cadet Lcorp. Don Treble, Cadet William Ireland, Cadet Doug Lane, Cadet Wes Swall and Cadet Lcorp. Don Cribbs. Scholarship awards of 520 each were given to Cadet Q.M - S. Allan Parker, Cadet Corp. Peter Daioe, Cadet Lcorp. Graham Dowler, Cadet LCorp. Barry IHffe and Cadet LCorp. John Kell. The father and son rifle competition was held after the pro gram and a film on Cler - Likp cadet camp. The winning cadets, assisted by their fathers were Cadet LCorp. Graham Dowler, Cadet LCorp. Barry lliffe and Cadet Dave Stewart. Members of the sponsoring corn - mi' tee include: C. S. Gow, prin cipal; Capt. R. O. Porter D.C.O ; J. A. McCulinch, treasurer; A. , Pyfcus, secretary; W. S. McEwen, school board representative; J. D. Dafoe, E. S. Fraser, G. D. Ilixfe, W. R Kell, W. A. Kennedy and G. C. Swilth. The Instructors of the corps were Mr. Gow, principal, Capt. Pybus, chief cadet instructor, Lt. Ralpn Wendehorne, and D. B. Chalmers, equipment officer. 390,000 Children In U.K. Get Extra Year's Schooling LONDON. March 31 CP) The school - leaving age for British youngsters will be raised from 14 to 15 Tuesday despite long parlla memtary discussions as to whether 390.000 additional children rfhould be kept in school an extra year at a time when Britain needs every hand in industry. The extra year is the first step toward the educationists' goal ol condary education lor all. It is hoped 13,000 new teachers will be ready for schools opening In September. With that number, the total number of teachers in aUle - aMed primary and seumdai) schools will be 189,000. Experiments in education are being conducted. For example, a boy interested in bulldnng model engines but finding difficulty with mathematics mav be set to drawlnt plans to scale wtilch will develop his ability to use numbers. All children between 11 anO 13 will have the amenities of a secondary school with equal standard; for each type of school modern, grammar and technical. Staunch Labor supporters agree that the Education Act of 1944. for. which Conervatlve R. A. Butler, former education minister, was largely responsible, is progressive 'eeWation designed to give even - British child a fair educational ehance. Even famous privately - owned public school like Eton and Harrow no longer are closed to those without means since thev are re quired to s"t the state program. Capacity Crowd Enjoys Annual Press Club Show A capacity crowd of more than 400 perwns attended the Winnipeg Press club's 14th annual Beer and Skits Saturday night at the Fort Garry hotel. The program featured 13 skits which lampooned and burlesqued public figures, institutions, radio and the press itself. While all the acU were loudly applauded, one of the most popular was Knock, Knock, which thowed the mayer, an 'alderman and the city treasurer trying to get Into the provincial premier' office in an effort to obtain greater financial aid for the city. "Open the Door Stuart", a song trongly resembling a recent hit, told of the city' dire need. Other skits dealt with Dominion - provincial relations, the atom bomb, leadership of the Liberal party, reports on the trouble at the Portage La Prairie Jail and the slash in the armed forces, Among those present were acting - Lieutenant - governor. Chief Justice E. A. McPherson; Premier Stuart Garson; Hon. J .0. McLen - aghen, attorney general, and Mayor Garnet Coulter. Producer was N. B. Zimmerman. Those who took part Included Jack Robertson, George - Weight, Wally MaClean, Bill Good, Bruce Larsen, Phil Lee, Wally Hilton, Don Aiken, Bruce McDonald, Don Stuppard, Harold Miloff, Ralph Bagley, Frank Morriss, Pete Whittajl, John T. Jones, Ted Schrader, Eric Wells and Jack Gearin. Harry Steel, president of the Winnipeg Press club, addressed the audience at the conclusion of the show. The committee In charge of arrangements included Wally Hiltm, chairman of the entertainment committee; Orton Grain, Ben Malkin, Herb Manning, Gord Aikmen, Harry Randall, A. W. Hanks, and A. E. Boothe. 400,000 Volt X - Ray Machine forCancer War in New Clinic KINGSTON, Ont., March 31 (CP) A 400,000 - volt X - ray machine, looking like somthing from Mars, will be a feature of medi cine's al. - out onslaught on deep cancers In the human body, visitors were told Saturday as they exam ined the new Kingston cancer clinic at Kingston General hospital A smaller version of the bl machine was shown at the clinic's opening when visitors entered an entirely lead - lined room to see the centre's other deep cancer attacker, a 200,000 - volt X - ray giant, controlled by , a panel on the outside wall. The clinic can handle 60 to 70 patients a day and though the total cost of dealing with a deep - seated cancer may run close to $350, all patients, no matter their financial, status, receive equal treatment. Funds are supplied by the Ontario Cancer Foundation, with Arthur Ford, of London, Ont., as chairman. The Foundation receives its money through public The pumpkin blossom holds the place in legends of the southwestern Indians that the lotus holds in Oriental lore. Claim Sabotage In U.S. Radio Beam to Moscow WASHINGTON, March 31 (AP) William Eenton, assistant secre - tury of state, declared today that American short wave transmitters! In Munich, aimed at Russia, had been "sabotaged". I The result was, he said in a' statement, that "Voice of America"' broadcasts to Russia were beamed to South America rather than Moscow. The sabotage now has been corrected. Benton's statement said that on March 27 he received a cable from E. J. Kerrigan, special consultant to the state department, from Munich, reporting that "the switching gear on one of our antennae hod been sabotaged." Benton added: "He said that the doors on the switch - house had been broken and the switch of the antennae had purposely been 'reversed' so that it was directed to South America rather than to Moscow." r fX 14 Believed Dead In Rhine Ferry Smash HAMBURG. March 31 (Reuters) At least 10 and possibly 14 per - i sons were killed today when the ' Duisburg - Hochfeld motor ferry col lided with a landing stage. The acci dent occurred when the strong Rhine current swept the ferry, which had 30 to 35 persons on iioanl, nut of control and dashed it against the pier. (Z(o)&D&5a I TO" CM H NT It AT USE THE CLASSIFIED O ADVTS. Why ihould row continue to suffw from Hwt af cough wtwfl ftKTUSSIN cm give you prompt relief. For over SOycors PERTUSSIN hat bmnrecognlsad a moit effective cough nirady niienc of bottle have been toM to tatMlecl wen. PERTUSSIN h sclentifkaNy prepared to work Inttmolty. Actt at once I Ioomtc sticky phlegm writ end effective for eld and young. At ol drug itorti. flowers 'ty - mre, " ' ? OStfKK LEAD THE EASTER PARADhE! Wherever you may be . . . send affection and devotion to loved o I ones with beautiful Flowerf by Wile. It's the smartest way tony, "Haslappy Easter", Easter Flowerj are so easy to send. Simply place your order w with any F.T.D. Florist who displays the Winged Mercury Stil on n - n bis shop window. Your wonderful flowers and personal cud nitsscssage can be delivered to any U.S. or Canadian city within I few bonours. Complete satisfaction is guaranteed for each F.T.D. member is bononnded. This year, be sure to send Easter Flowers by Wire to that ipeaoecial lady in your life. There's no substitute for her favorite flowers srvrwben it conies to a warm and sincere Easter Greeting. Also, for Birthdays, Holidays, Illness, Anniversaries, fiiuinessonor it IN ANY EVENT - WIRE FLOWERS S v, It's inexpensive," too. A M IVOO bouquet can be lent from mm Win - nifyg (including the cert it of the wire ) to Vancouve for J5.;.0.92 . . , to Hamilton for $57 ..... to Montreal for $5.87.. ,tttoMin. neapolis, Minn, for J5.67. .V. Overseas orders filial, loo. FLORISTS' TELEGRAPH DELIVERY INTERNATIONAL, i49Mi.hi,. AD..n(ti6,at,Mik. w , m . i: .s,., ..T?,,rmm lmmrmilr , v Most talked about new cair oim the radio and everywhere FAR - ADVANCED POSTWAR STUDEBAKEM pUT your money into a real postwar car, if you're buying a new one. Get this car that's completely new from top to whf els get this excitingly different Studebaker. Low, long, beautifully contoured, the dramatically original new body of this 1947 Studebaker is amazingly roomy and its attractively large areas of windshield and window glass allow you to "see everything." Revolutionary new chassis engineering gives these 1947 Studebaker Champions and Commanders a delightful new kind of riding comfort and handling ease. Every detail is solid and sound with Studcbaker'i ii matchless, top - quality craftsmanship. Set this thrilling postwar Sludtbaker no - once t you do, you won't be satisfied till you become its e:s prou2 owner. WORLD'S ONLY CAR WITH BRAKES THAT AUTOMATICALLY ADJUST THEMSELVES ..AND NO - GIARE "HACK U0HT" INSTRUMENT DIALS CONSOLIDATED MOTORS 235 Main Street Winnipeg, Man. Phone 92 721

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