The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on July 29, 1953 · Page 7
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 7

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Blytheville, Arkansas
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Wednesday, July 29, 1953
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Page 7
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WEDNESDAY, JULY 2!5, 1953 BI,YTHEVTT,T,E (AKK.V COURIER PAGE SEVEN Yankees Work Hard to Win NEW YORK (AP) — After his New York Yankees won 18 games in a row, Manager Casey Stengel thought he had the American League Pennant cinched. Before Completing First Full Season, VersatileO'Connell Is Pittsburgh Pro But he has learned his lesson. "Why," he said today before ^sending his team against the Cleveland Indians, "I wouldn't even I count the Indians out yet, not with I the kind of pitching they have." The Yanks bent the Tribe 4-2 last I night, but they had to work to win I it. If Stengel's men can knock down the Indians in the remaining two games of the current series, they will have taken care of one of their main threats. Then they'd only have to worry about the Chicago White sox and the Boston Red Sox. Club Looked Better "Anyway, the entire club looked better than at any time since we won a double-header from the White Sox more than a week ago," rasped the old professor. "I know now that I have two pitchers, Allie Reynolds and Whitey Ford. They both looked great against the Indians." Ford started lost night's battle and gave up five hits in 6 2-3 innings before he was rescued by Reynolds who permitted two hits the rest of the way. The super-chief of the Yanks' staff came on when Ford was tapped for two runs in the seventh. "That was a big victory for us," Stengel continued, "and I don't mind admitting that it took a load off my mind. I was plenty worried after we looked so terrible in Cleveland and Detroit on our last Western trip." Osceola Meets Parkin Tonight Another rubber game is on tap tonight at Hale Field, Osceola when the Osceola Little Leaguers play Parkin. In their last encounter at Parkin the OLL lost a 8-6 decision after having beat the Parkin nine decisively In Osceola several weeks back by a count of 16-6. Probable starters for the Osceola team will, he Ray Mann, Jr., catcher; Ed Weldon, pitcher: Jerry Hill, first base; Wayne Pierce or Mar Weiss, second base; Ray Adcock, shortstop; Jack Morse, :Mrd base; Logan Young, left field; Stan Sanders, centerfield; and Buddy Mclntyre, right field. Game time; 8:00. By MURRAY OLDERMAN NEA Staff Correspondent PITTSBURGH — (NEA) — Danny O'Connell, who has yet to play his first full season of major league baseball, already is acclaimed the finest player with the Pirates. It may be an indictment of the roster, but we prefer to consider it an accolade for the versatile young inflelder from Paterson, N J. Around the circuit, in true Stengel- ese, they talk about "that infield fella" from Pitteburph, The Pro. There's no question of identity O'Connell could piay regularly (or any other team in the majors despite the fact that Chuck Dressen was looking toward Brooklyn at Ail- Star picking time. Incidentally, the 24 - year - old Irishman is from out of the Dodgers' farm system. Like Bill Hunter, the Browns' shoit.st.op, Danny boy was surplus property after hitting -314 for St. Paul of the American Association Furillo Was Hardly Cut Out To Be Dodger, But The Arm Skines, With Little Fanfare By JOHN McCALLUM NEA Staff Correspondent NEW YORK — (NEA) — A large number of Brooklyn fans — who still yearn, subconsciously or otherwise, for the daffy days of Babe Herman — perhaps will never understand the calm, business-like way Carl Anthony Furillo goes about playing baseball. Their peculiar attitude is gummed up In a statement which one of them made the other day. "Sure, Carl can play with the best of "em," said the cash customer, "but you gotta be a real Brooklyn bum to make the grade here. The trouble with Furillo is, he's too quiet, never gets mad. They'll never make a bum outta him!" When tho Cubs' Bob Rush skulled the Dodger right fielder at Ebbets Field, railblrds cried "beanball." It was suggested later best | growth above the eye, spoiling my • • • • vision. Glasses did not h'elp, but an eye operation in January has me seeing clearly again. "I'm not trying to overpower the ball, either. Wrien you're trying to hit a home rpn, you never hit one. You're trying to meet the ball WH£W THEYKEPER TO THE PR® OH TUB P;TTi>8U<56H BALL. CLUB T«£V C/W Al£4W O/V4.V T-HiKD BA-SSMAfJ 111 1949. He was sold to the Plrntes for $50,000 and a throw-in player. If Seer Branch Rickey didn't know for sure then he was going to Ghift to Pittsburgh, he must have had a premonition. As for Danny, there's still a question whether he was promoted or demoted. The question, however, doesn't ?eem to affect his oerforrn- ance. After further apprenticeship with IndianapoliK, Danny moved up to the Buccaneers in 1950 to hit .292 in 79 pames and play a slick shortstop and third base. * . • Bonus Warner, who should recognize an infielder, predicted. "Danny will develop into a great, great ball player." Danny came back thifi season from two years in the Army and promptly set about making Honus look good. He settled at third after a short whirl at second, yet his natural position Is shortfitop. He's ;uick, has great hands and a good arm. His hitting hovers around .300, with a fair sprinkling of home runs. Danny'll be around for a long time. And not always unsung. Football Stars Deflated LAFAYETTE, Ind. (IP)— Miss Marian Brown of. Oak Park. III., the All-star Queen of 1953. deflated a number of college football heroes In a little speech at, tHe collegians' training camp yesterday. "The greatest football player In the country is Chuck Hoag of Kan- Riley, Murray Western Link Meet Favorites CINCINNATI. 'fl-Siocky Polly Riley and attractive Mae Murray were tabbed as the girls to watch Frank Scott, 14-year old secretary of the Corvallis, Ore., Bowling Association, recently rolled a series ot 190-191-192. Hoble Landrith, 23-year-old catcher for the Cincinnati Redlegs. attended Michigan State University. star senior at Oak Park Hich School when Marian wafi a freshman there. ..... said prrttv 20-yoar-oUi Marian. ^ " S "* 5M Anm ' i " W ° men ' s It spcms the. Kansas ace was a ! Weslern Amateur Golf Tournament went into its second round. Miss Riley. the Fort Worth, Tox., expert who won the tournament in 1950 and last year, met Edenn Anderson of Helena, Mont., today. Miss Murray, whose home is in Rutland, Vt.. was the hottest shooter in the tournament yesterday as she moyed up to a second round match against Mary Ann Downey of Baltimore. Md!. run WARNING ORDER In the Chancery Court, Chlrk.i- smvba District, Mississippi County, Arkansas. Lucius Vassar (Col), ptf. vs. No. 12429 Ethel Vassar (Col), Dft. The defendant, Ethel Vassal. IE i ner-up in this tournament in 1951 and 1952. Miss Murray, a former Curtis Cup player, blislered the Camargo Country Club course for a five- under-par 10 yesterday as she hereby warned to appear ivithin thirty days in the court named In the caption hereof and answer the complaint of the plaintiff Lucius Vassar. Dated this 7th day of July. 19E53. Geraldine Listen, Clerk By Laverne Ball. D.C. Taylor & Sudbury, attorney for ptf. James Garner, atty. Ad Litem. T8-15-22-29 Only nine mares have won the four and a half mile Aintree Grand i National out of 115 runnings. The 1 1951 winner, Nickle Coin, a 9-year I old mare, was groomed by a girl, i The Florida State University football team will use the "I" formation this fall. A lew split-T plays also will be used. Television SERVICE ANY MAKE PA Systems lor Sale or Rent PHILCO FACTORY SERVICE Blaylock's N. Highway 61 whipped Mrs. Dorothy Germain Porter of Hnvertown, Pa., 2 up. It was a new competitive course record for Camargo's 6,523-yard layout and Bill Jackson, veteran pro at the course, called It one of the finest rounds ever shot by a woman anywhere. Miss Rilny was even par In a 3 and 1 victory over Jean Hopkins tf Cleveland. Th fiber helmets worn under eys' silk caps were tntro duced to American racing by Col. Edward R. Bradley. Still, Forget it. Maytag dose all tho work. SM it <"»««^w|299.85 Adams Appliance Co. Inc. Parts and Supplies for All Cars, Trucks and Tractors WHOLESALE Fabulous Jew 1953 "MAGIC-CYCLE" DfFROSTING KELVIHATORS! er out at first base! "I tried that play 10 times before 'way out in front of the plate like i It Worked," he confesses, this, and your timing, swing, I Furillo set something of a high- stride, eyes — everything gets off' Jumping mark spearing Johnny Carl Furillo that pitchers in the future found deliberately throwing at batters' heads should be taken out of the game, even suspended. "What the heck," said Furillo, "they have to make a living. I don't think any pitcher actually tries to hit a man in the head. They just want to knock you down, or maybe if they really want to get you they'll try to hit you in the back, that's all." Carl Furillo is a genuine nine- inning ball player, no part-time worker. Muscular, dark-haired, agreeable, there's no side to the guy, no strut, no effort to pretend that playing in the big leagues is anything more than a job. Ask him why his batting average isn early 100 points above 1952'sl production, and he says, matter of factly: "Hitting Is a matter of timing. I was bothered last season with a and you pop up." Furillo and Pee Wee Reese are the last of the Larry MacPhail regime, are both enjoying one of their best years. Carl climbed into the Cubs' series batting .324, including 11 homers, four triples, 17 doubles and 48 runs batted in, This compared to eight homers, one triple, 18 doubles and 59 runs bati ted in all last year! Carl, 31, six-foot. 190 pounds, has been on the Dodger varsity since 1946, his .294 lifetime batting average being the seventh among active National League players. The Arm's amaizng comeback got him a spot in the All-Star Game. "A lot to having a good year is luck." says the Italiano, philosophically. "I've had my share of breaks this season. So many things have to be just right ror a good year. Above all, you've got to be mentally and physically sound." Furillo broke into organized ball as a pitcher with Pokomoke. City of the Eastern Shore League in J940, had a 2-3 record when promoted to Reading, Pa. "The Dodgers purchased the Heading franchise shortly after, me with It," explains Carl. "I've been Brooklyn property ever since." The Arm Invariably led the NL outfielders in assists before run- became discouraged and stopped going for that extra base In Pittsburgh one day, he fielded - clean single and threw the bat- Mize's booming drive in front of Yankee Stadium's right field barrier in the 1952 World Series. He gloved the ball smack out of the lap of a lady fan. "Aw, gee," she cried, "I wanted that ball!" "Lady," said Carl Furillo, "I wanted it more than you did." style has made him n big favorite with fans and TV viewers, will be gunning for his 14th straight victory. Fiore has a damaging left hook, which has helped him score 16 knockouts in his 42 victories. Giovanelli, Fiore Scrap Tonight NEW YORK W— Buzz-saw Danny Giovanelli rules a slight favorite over hooking Carmine Fiore in their all-Brooklyn welterweight scrap tonight at Madison Square Garden. 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