The Baltimore Sun from Baltimore, Maryland on July 31, 1938 · 10
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The Baltimore Sun from Baltimore, Maryland · 10

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Baltimore, Maryland
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Sunday, July 31, 1938
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10
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10 THE SUN, BALTIMORE. SUNDAY' MORNING. 1TULY 31. 193S REFUGEE PARLEY ' WILL BE RESUMED Evian Conference To Meet In London Early In . August . Democracies Sympathize With Unwanted Jews, But Fail To Solve Problem 7 Jf. .1. 3. SABGIXT (Special Dispatch to The Sun London, July 30 If it has done nothing else, the conference on refugees from Germany and Austria, which was convened at Evian by the United States and which is to meet again in London early in August, has once gain shown the sympathy for the oppressed which is shared by the three great democracies of the world, the United States, Great Britain and France. . v Each of these countries placed on record its desire to come to the aid of those to whom, as the Zionists expressed it, the world appeared to consist of countries where Jews cannot live and countries which Jews cannot enter. In casting around for possible new homes for those unhappy people who can no longer exist in Germany and Austria, the conference first considered the more sparsely populated regions of the world as being able perhaps to provide new homes for an afflicted race. Australia Prefers British What was the result? Australia, where a whole continent is only now supporting little more than two-thirds of the population of New York, while expressing its complete agreement with the idea underlying the conference, declared that it wanted to draw its manpower from the source from which most of its citizens had sprung, that is to say Great Britain. Canada dwelt on its unemployment problems and held put little hope that many refugees could be absorbed, while Brazil, another country of vast mpty spaces, made it clear that the great bulk of immigrants must be agricultural workers or people connected with some industry closely related to agriculture. One Of Major Tragedies It is this problem of finding new homes for people not wanted in the lands of their birth which is one of the major tragedies of present-day international life. We have seen it in the case of the Assyrian Christians, who dwelt in the valleys of the Euphrates and the Tigris, and were therefore Turkish subjects at the beginning of the great war. They threw in ' their lot with the Allies and fought stoutly against their Turkish masters, but, when the war came to an end and the Kingdom of Iraq was set up where Mesopotamia had once been, these Christians were no longer wanted by the Arab Government of Baghdad, and they are now wandering homeless. Much Sympathy, Little Else The Evian conference made it clear that the democratic countries of the world, approached the refugee problem with much sympathy and good will, but with little else. No concrete proposal for moving these vast numbers of people to happier surroundings was put forward. As usual with international conferences, it was agreed to postpone decision until another conference had sat, and the meeting in London will open with a troubled inheritance. One question which cannot be Ignored is, assuming that some sort of arrangement is made for removing refugees from Germany and Austria, will the matter end there? Already demands are being made that the confer ence should consider the position of Jewish refugees from other European countries. Where can those countries which do not put anti-Semitism In the forefront of their policy And room for all these people without gravely injuring their own citizens, who are finding the fight for life hard enough as it is? Cross Frontiers Destitute Finally, the condition in which German refueees are allowed to emerge Ifrom their country adds immensely to the difficulty of finding new homes for them. Germany has proclaimed her readiness to allow the Jews to leave the country, but she is also seeing to it that they cross the frontiers destitute. Germany's policy of confiscation makes the work of rescue next to impossible. If governments can first strip and then turn out beyond their frontiers immense numbers of undesired citizens, the rest of the world is confronted with a puzzle which no meeting of humanitarians can solve. It if not yet too late to hope that some change of policy may occur in Berlin, but it is also clear that the London conference will open in conditions which might discourage the most optimistic and charitable hearts." (Continued from Page 1) should have been able to respond in some manner to the repeated radio calls, flares and rocket signals used by the hunting craft. Some company executives said a rough, but not disastrous, landing could have put her radio apparatus out of commission. A telephone co'mpany employe on Lahuy Island, west of Catanduanes Hand, which is approximately 230 miles east by south from here, said he heard a plane flying above clouds three hours after the clipper's last re- port. Airways officials said the island is directly on the Guam-Manila route and is among the first islands of the Philippine archipelago sighted on the westward flight from Guam. Two Other Clippers Arrive At Destinations Alameda, Cal., July 30 (fl1) Pan- American Airways' Philippine clipper alighted at the base here today after routine flight from Honolulu with nine passengers. In flight it passed the giant China Clipper, which left Alameda yesterday and arrived in Honolulu at 10 A. M. today (P.S.T.) with ten pas sengers. Both flights carried last-minute pas- Dr. Sch- hundred! ef unified pali.nu navar h.illata to rae- ommand him to thair frwmdi. Ean In a platawark, brldaa. ate., art mada right In Dp. Sachs own laboratoryfor areatar comfort and graalar aconomy. PLNTCS; mada I to look J1 0 I X-NSVt, natural.. "u I riLLINQS' (BfjiD&a 506 C Baltimore t. cor. Cay Maura Ofiy t . H. t a. M .. II) a. M. ia 2 M C.I Jill Electric Sewing Machines . Sell Regularly $75 1 pgSffis MM Ideal hemstUciier and ripper foot included with the purchase of each machine, without extra charge. Terms Eatily Arranged Thu May Co. Sewlna; Machine Department, Second Floor. Response "will he tremendous on these new 1938 models. Fully equipped, noted for darning. Liberal allowance for your old machine. The MAY Company The Sun, The Sea, The Open Road . . all take their toll of EYESTRAIN 1 It is at this season of the year that our eyes are put to the most trving of a11 tests their ability to withstand SUMMER GLARE. Our OPTICAL DEPARTMENT is splendidly equipped to show you just exactly what YOUR eves need for Summer Glare Protection. AND C5UR PRICES ARE LOWEST CONSISTENT WITH QUALITY. You May Use Your Charge Account or Our Optical Budget Plan oj Convenient Payments. Have Your Eyes Examined Now By Dr. M. I. SELTZER. Optometrist THK MAT CO. Optical Icpartmtnt. Second Floor. THE MAY "CO. HOPE OF FINDING CLIPPER WANING Discovery Of Large Oil Slick Is Regarded As Fateful Sign Leads To Belief Big Plane, With 15 Aboard, Plunged Into Sea sengers who booked passage after. the Hawaii Clipper was reported missing off the Philippine Islands. Airways of ficials said there were no cancellations of passage. Roosevelt Seeks In Vain For Century-Old Grave Leads Party On San Salvador Island In Hunt For Remains. Of Lieut. John S. Cowan Aboard Cruiser Houston, in Galapagos Archipelago, July 30 (Rr-Led personally by President Roosevelt, a party of fifty officers and men from the cruiser Houston searched San Salvador Island fruitlessly today for the grave of Lieut John S. Cowan, of the United States frigate Essex, buried on the island in 1813. . One hundred and twenty-five years of erosion by wind and, water evidently had era.sed all evidence of the grave. Lieutenant Cowan, aged 21, believed killed in a pistol duel with another member of the Essex's company, was buried by Admiral David Porter, then commander of the frigate. President Roosevelt had hoped to be able to have the remains of Cowan removed to the United States Naval Academy at Annapolis. Given 30 To 40 Years For Killing Ranch Owner Prescott (Ariz.) Sportsman Sentenced For Slaying Member Of Washington Family Prescott, Ariz., July 30 (P) Ernesto Lira, Prescott sportsman, was sentenced today to serve thirty to forty years in the State prison for slaying Marcus Jay Lawrence, 35, wealthy ranch owner. Defense attorneys did not seek a new trial, nor was notice of appeal given. Lira was convicted of second-degree murder July 16. He fatally beat Lawrence, member of prominent Washington (D. C.) family, when he found Lawrence and Mrs. Odessa Webb, who had lived with Lira as his wife for five years, in an intimate situation following i birthday party for Mrs. Webb May 11 ABVHCE THAT. US WORTTSL FR S! See Our Registered Optometrist! Easy Terms LEXINGTON AT PARK 0 ... AUGUST SALE CORSE TRY! Orlg. 2.50 to S10 y2 Now US to S5 VOGUE! VANITY! FLEXEE! NUBACK ind OTHERS! There's ;ust one and two-of-a-kind . . . but stvles for every figure type and almost every size in the group! Don't let this opportunity slip by "you. Rubber reducing garments included. Other Corset Values Simple Vogue Foundations Reg: $5to7.S0 Ayeraga foundations and girdles. Ona and two of a kind. Not all sues a every style. Vanity Foundations and Girdles tt" 2.49 New purchase IrV-inch side-honk or Talon cloning girdles and foundation. Inner belt garments included. Mesh Foundations and Girdles Regularly 2.50 fl. 14 and lA-inch length si da-hook aeJ slinon girdle. Foundations witk a without inner bait. Short or avaraga. Tho Mar Co. Cora., Tfclri Bli Monday ffj 1 he h eight of- our THUS August Furniture Sale Presents Achievements ! J? COLONIAL IH1MI I' St"'-! Vr If A I it ' and MODERN TO in Mm from one of America's most noted makers at dm l 6 n An amazing sale Indeed. A sale so remarkable tnat Baltimoreans will quickly take this beautiful furniture from our floor. The purchase, one of the most extraordinary in our history, could only be possible under market conditions that prevailed earlier this year when furniture was at its lowest rjrice in years. The manufacturer had a number of superb bedroom suites and individual bedroom pieces which he was willing to turn into cash at a discount so large that we can offer the entire group at HALF PRICE. MODERN DESIGN Mad to cai r Sell for AI-t 3 7-Pe. Suites . 300.00 Rich oriental wood veneers. 149.00 1 7-Pc. Suitei 400.00 qS Serpentine front. Sun tan finish. AUOaVU 3 7-Pe. Suite.. 400.00 198.00 Serpentine front. Butt walnut veneers. g Odd Modern Chat t Robes 79.50 To match above suites, Jjf.OU COLONIAL DESIGN Mead: SALE $mll for 4- 3-Pc. Walnut Suitet...l39.00 co ftft Dresser, chest, bed. W.UU 4 3-Pc. Walnut Sultss. 139.00 CQ ftn Dressing table, chest, bed. OJI.UU 1- 3-Pe. Walnut Sulta.. 159.00 Q ftn Vanity, hiboy and bed. H.UU 2 3-Pc. Walnut Sulte.... 139.00 ' Dresser, chest and bed. OiJ.UU 2 3-Pc. Walnut Suites 139.00 c0 ftft Dressing table, hiboy and bed. b".0U Mad to eii StUor 9eA 5 S-Pe. Mahogany Sultaa 139.00 c0 nft Dresser, chest and bed. O.WU 3 3-Pc. Mahogany Suites 129.00 -Q nn Vanity, Salem Chests, bed. wlT.wv 2 3-Pc. Curly Mapla Suites .139.00 fi0 ftft Dresser, chest and bed. Oa.WU 1 3-Pc. Curly Mapla ' Suite 129.00 0 ftft Dressing table, chest, bed. 317.UV 2 3-Pc. Curly Mapla Suites.... 139.00 c0 nn Dressing table, rhest-on-chest, bed. 3 4-Pc. Curly Mapla Suites 169.00 -0 nft Twin beds, vanity, hiboy. fWW 22 Dressing Tablet.. $49-569 10 or; Maple, walnut, mahogany. ISf.lW 2 Mahogany Saltm , 1Q oc Chests 40.00 19.95 12 Nita Tabtas .....12.95... 6.45 Walnut, mahogany, maple. Match suites. 27 Bedroom Chairs and -Banchas 8.95-10.95 .. 4.45 Maple,, walnut . mahogany. VXiter i fT " 1 USE OUR CLUB PLAN-iv. this convenient payment lan on furniture purchases of $20 or more. Smsll down payment, ow monthly terms. Ko carrying charge if paid in 90 daya. Be early at this sale! We expect a complete sell-out In short o refer. Come at 9:30 Monday morning, even iff you have to break engagements. Th Msjr Co. Furniture Seventh floor. Above Suite $149.00 FREE STORAGE A nominal r! posit will hold your furniture in tor$a iorPOdsys. Ko extra charge.

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