The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on July 22, 1953 · Page 5
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 5

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Blytheville, Arkansas
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Wednesday, July 22, 1953
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Page 5
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TfEDNESDAY, JULY 22, 1553 SLTTHEVl'LLE (ARKT COTmiKR N1BWS PACT Hope Sparks Hollywood's Jamboree Invasion By GABBER DAVIDSON JAMBOREE CITY, Calif. (AP) — Jamboree Boy Scouts went back to their scoutcraft activities today full of chuckles and memories of a big Hollywood show last night that brought them Bob Hope and a full lineup of film talent. Master of ceremonies Hope set the pace for the fun night of the third National Boy Scout Jamboree in a big outdoor arena on this Southern California ranch. When he looked out' over the 45,000 scouts and leaders, including 66 scouts from 23 foreign lands, he quipped: "This is the United Nations in ihort pants." The hillside jammed with boys In regulation jamboree short pants roared, and Hope continued: "I love the Boy Scouts. But I wish they wouldn't help me across the street." Other samples of Hope: "I was a Boy Scout myself once but I didn't like the short pants. The boys kept rubbing my knees together to start fires." "Oh, yes, and Bing Crosby was a scout, you know; a member of the dinosaur patrol." Jane Powell, accompanied by a Marine Corps band, sang the "Star Spangled Banner." . Debbie Reynolds, favorite of the teen-agers, sang a couple of songs, joked with the boys and responded to their whistles with: "Sounds like the wolf patrol." Director Al Rogell and a film crew reproduced a few minutes from the working day on a Hollywood sound stage, [our four swordsmen in .a spirited "Three Musketeers" fencing scene. There followed .a stagecoach scene, other comedy and singing acts and the introduction of a parade of stars, including Danny Kaye, Dick Powell, Preston Poster, George Momcomery, Vera Ellen and Rory Calhoun. Jamboree officials estimated that counting visitors and scout leaders, approximately 100,000 attended the show. Before the event some of the 7952 Was Another Boom Year WASHINGTON Wl—The nation's boom economy in 1952 rang up a record total production worth some 348 billion dollars, according to the Department of Commerce. Individuals spent more for food alone in 1952, the government re- 600,000,000 in 1952, R 5 per cent advance over 1951. More than two- thirds of this was wages and salaries. And personal income was 5209,700,000,000, a rise of 6 per cent over 1951. Like gross national product, na- I port said, than the total dollar tional income and personal income value of all goods and services the j also hit record peaks in 1952, the ""'Commerce Department said. Spending by individuals also nation produced in any of five depression years 1931-35. However, the depression dollar was more valuable than the 1952 dollar. Measured by the dollar's purchasing, power in 1939, which the department took as a yardstick, the country's gross national product in 1952 was nearly three times what it was at the depression low in 1933. The gross national product is the total value of all goods and I Hollywood celebrities took* a look ' services produced. over the 3,000 acres of the jamboree site. Miss Reynolds was a great favorite with the boys. Two wide-eyed Ohio boys asked her to autograph their neckerchiefs aricl she complied, saying with a laugh: "You'll probably trade them for skunk skins." The bo.vs were Kenneth Zellers, 12, of Troop 45 in Hartville, and Tom Schmeltzer, 13, of Troop 32 at Canton. The boys, were shy but Kenneth murmured an "Oh, boy!" Without adjustment for the difference in the purchasing power of the dollar before and after 1939, the nation's 3952 output was more than six times that of 1933. And, the Department of Commerce report released yesterday said, government spending in 1952, without adjustment for the changed dollar, was nearly 10 times what it was in 1933 — Tl'.i billion dollars in 1952 compared to somewhat less than 8 billions in 1933. National income reached $291,Star Doesn't Complain About Pay By BOB THOMAS HOLLYWOOD (AP) — Here's news. Robert Wagner, No. 1 boy with the bobbysoxers and star of his studio's biggest pictures, earns a paltry $350 a week and isn't complaining. Of course, $350 a week may seem like a sizable chunk of change to you and me, but it's small potatoes in the movie world. Especially far a lad like Bob Wagner. He is currently the top man on i of buildup you can get only at a all the fan magazine polls. The major studio " malfshop set goes for him with a | But don't get the idea that young devotion that recalls the palmiest Wagner is going to allow himseU days of Van Johnson and Prank to be exploited. He's too hep Sinatra. His studio, 20th Century- Fox, has taken a tip from the teen-agers and put Wagner in top properties. He recently finished Mile Reef," a wide-scveen epic of sponge fishing filmed entirely in Florida. Now he's playing the title role in "Prince Valient," a super-budget Cinemascope film in which he'll be surrounded by Janet Leigh, Debra Faget,, Sterling Hayden, James Mason and a flock of topnotch actors. All of them will doubtless be making more money than the star of the film. "I'm not complaining," said the handsome, 23-year-old .actor. ."I'm grateful to the- studio, when I came here four years ago, I didn't know the first thing: about acting. They took a chance on me, and I couldn't have had better training. Big" Buildups "Every picture I have been in has been a top attraction, with the exception of two. That's the kind let that happen. "I could probably get a new deal from the studio right now," he remarked. "But time is in my favor. My next option period is in April. By that time. '12 Mile Reef and 'Prince Valiant" will be released. Then I will be in a better bargaining position " 'Prince Valiant' alone is worth five million dollars to me, as far as my future career is concerned. It is a natural, the kind of picture that comes once in a lifetime for an actor." So while Bob is waiting for the big money to roll in, he is learning how to be a movie star and live on $350 a week. That's harder than it sounds, according to him. "By the time I pay my agent's 10 per cent, rent, insurance, clothes taxes and other expenses, I find I have nothing left," he remarked. "And for 12 weeks out of the year, I don't earn any salary." Strict Budget ager and consulted the business agent who handles such stars as Humphrey Bogart and Dick Powell. "If you cnn't save any money on S350 a week, you probably couldn't save on 860,000 a year," the money man told him. "Do you realize thai some judges earn as much as you do and yet are able to maintain nice houses and cars put their children through school etc.?" Bob hired the man to take care of his pay check and now he's on a strict budget. "I couldn't get an extra quarter to see an earthquake," the actor sigl But he doesn't have to worry. Despite present-day economy, his bosses will probably be, coming up with a new contract soon. Reason: so the studio will have seven more years of his services, instead oi the present four, "That's all right with me too," said Bob. "When the new contract is over, I'll be 30. If I have continued to grow, I'll be in a position to knock off really big money as free lancer. No doubt about it, here's a kid topped all previous records. Gun Cache Is Uncovered NEW YORK aiders from the district attorney's office yesterday uncovered a cache of 118 unregistered guns in a building facing York He decided he needed a man-who's going to get ahead. IN FOOP has the amazmg, built-in FREEZ-FSLE It's right on the door! Just press to open! IT TELLS YOU AT A GLANCE ...what frozon foods you havt ...whttra they're stored ...how long you'vo had them ;*.haw much you'vo u**d [you CAN BI SURE...IF IT'S W^stinghouse • ..of CMHI*, il't •J*cfr/el MODEL UFE-IM And only gives you ALL f/iese features ftOll.OUT FRtEZIK DRAWtK Provide* convenient storage for odd-iihaped pack- aget . . . hig turkeys . . . gallons of ice cream. QUICK-FREEH SHtLF Seals in the originnl color, flnvor ;»nd vitamins at 15° below zero. RACK Protect* fragile pica and cnken. INHCR SHELF-DOORS You open only one compartment at a timo . , . file, not pilo, froren food*. gHllUliaui lue ucaiu. •*>.«« T> •.^•wi • , < Ark-Mo Power Co. the back entrance of New City police headquarters. Where the guns — foreign and American revolvers and automatics of various calibers—came from and for what use they were intended was not immediately known, the prosecutor's office said. A licensed gunsmith and a manufacturer of police billies were arrested on charges of violating the weapons law. Senate Votes Down Rubber They Want U.S. To Get Out Of the Business Housing Bill Gets Okayed Salons Gripe Over Long Hours WASHINGTON HI— Two senators cautioned their colleagues last WASHINGTON (SI — The House has voted to permit building of 20,000 public, low-ront housing! night they may have to pay a price units oul of some 60.000 already i for the long hours (hey are work- coiitraclod for in the year which: ing in a drive to adjourn by the started July 1. j end of the mouth. It originally voted to permit! " r wonder how many times men none. The Senate okayed the 35,000 j ' ike Willis Smith have to drop a.skod by President Eisenhower. A' dead," said Sen. Anderson <D, ... . ,, . „„. .compromise bill, calling for 20,000, ; NM). before sessions are short- ast night a bill to get : u ,. ls , lppl . ovct | 2 3 9 . 2(il bv t | 10 House cned - Sen ' Smith (D-NC) died re- yestcrday. It still requires Senate cently of a heart attack. Sen. approval. i Morse find-Ore) said several sen- The housing provision is con. tiiincd in a $447,429.499 money bill ; for a score of government agen- Heally Italian Napoleon was z descendant of an old Italian family and was a Frenchman only because the island of Corsica had joined France the year before he was born. ') — The Senate; WASHINGTON passed 65-16 the government out of the thetic rubber business but it, attached ftn amendment some senators declared might prevent sale of the government-owned 29 plants. The measure, asked by President] cics. Eisenhower, now goes to a Senate! conference with the House .which approved it in a form lacking many' of the Senate provisions. The amendment which supporters of the bill said might be fatal was sponsored by Sen. Russell Long <D- La) and adopted 47-35, with Demo-! Additional Subversives „ T u-r.niv „,d*=d bfU y" y Hoover Sees Senators WASHINGTON W)_'7 would like call attention to a distinguished visitor," said Vice President Nixon last night. "This is the first occasion on which he has visited this :hamber." The senators turned and there, n the rear, was former President Herbert Hoover. He received a thunderous ovation from senators and :-hose in the galleries. The Senate took a 10-minut.e recess while Republicans and Democrats alike filed by and shook his hand. Hoover remained for a short while after the Senate returned GO work. Most Palms Largest number of coconut palms, 10,000. to be found in one place in the United States arc on the upper half of Key Biscayne, near Miami, Pla. crats supplying most of the ''y^' ( o™ BTowlicil yesterda? to the list votes ' lot li)2 previously designated by his Long's amendment would permit: predecessors as subversive. Tin either branch of Congress to veto; list is employed, among othci any of the sales individually. As! things, in weighing the loyalty of reported by the Banking Commit-j federal workers, tee, the bill would have required the \ Browncll said the, 20 added yes- Senate or House to accept or reject! terr'ay had not filed proper notice the disposal program in one pack- of contest after he notified them age. of his impending action. Nineteen Will They Buy? othrrs did file such notices, lie „ snid, and hearings will Sen. Capehart (R-Ind.), Banking And 23 other notices were returned Committee chairman, argued that unclaimed, he said, and those the long amendment would keep; groups will be added to the list private companies from bidding on ' in 30 days unless they file con- the plants. He said they would fear i tests. Congress might turn down some of the sales, and thus leave part of the plants under government operation Gold Converter in competition with private business. Philosopher's stone" is the But Democratic Leader Lyndon term applied to the mineral B. Johnson of Texas told him, "You ; sought by alchemists which can walk out any entrance to this; would, upon contact, convert baser Senate chamber right now, and you: metals into gold. will find plenty of people who want to buy these plants." The 29 plants were built in World War II at a cost of 518 million dollars. Read Courier News Classified Ads. Fiery, Smarting Itch of Common Skin Rashes Don't stand such torment any longer! Just smooth Resinol Ointment on your irritated skin at once. See how quickly it« medically proven ingredients in lanolin bring restful, long-lasting relief. Quick Relief for MUSCULAR ACHES Tost STANBACK Yourseli . . . lab- lete or powders . . . against any preparation you've ever used. ators had gone home "for their own self-health protection." Acting Republican Leader Knowland of California said he thought the pace was not too grueling. He said he,may ask another late session tonight. RITZ THEATRE Manila, Ark. ••••••••••••••••••••• LAST TIMES TONITE THE HITCH-HIKER With Edmond O'Brien Frank Lovejoy First machine for tanning sole leather was a simple horse-driven stone mill that ground oak bark, invented In 1626 by Peter Minuit, of New York, HEATING •qu/pmenf ROUND-UP SALE! 40 $ 30 '20 TRADE-IN TRAOE.IN TMK-IN $ THURSDAY ONLY I WAS AN AMERICAN SPY With Ann Dvorak & Gene Evans on your old heating appliance with purchase of automatic NEW Cokman FLOOR FURNACE or GAS WALL HEATER (LIMITED TIME) DOWN PAYMENT months (o pay HalsellS White Furniture Company 113 S. Division Phone 6098 n of/these important ways. . . IN POWER AND PERFORMANCE Chevrolet's entirely new 115-h.p. "Blue-Flame" engine (teamed with Powerglide*) is the most powerful engine in the low-price field!'in gearshift models, you get the advanced 108-h.p. "Thrift-King" engine. Doth give brilliant new performance and outstanding new economy. ...IN STYLE AND LUXURY .IN EASE OF DRIVING The sleek, low-slung beauty of this fine new car provides one more reason for Chevrolet's truly amazing popularity. The new Fisher Body provides roomy, luxurious interiors, modern appointments and colorful, fine-fabric upholstery that can be matched only in costlier cars. . IN ECONOMY AND VALUE Entirely new Powerglide auto- malic transmission, with faster getaway and greater economy, eliminates the clutch pedal completely. And Chevrolet's new Power Steering* docs 80% of the work for you . . . lets you squeeze in or out of ti^lH spaces with wonderful new ease. Long famous for economical operation, Chevrolet brings you the most important gain in gasoline economy in its history! And, you save suh- stantial amounts on over-all upkeep, too. Yet with all its wonderful new things, Chevrolet remains lite lowest priced line in the low-price field! The striding new Bel Air Sport Coupe. With 3 great new series, Chevrolet offers the widest choice of models in its field. . IN FIRST PLACE POPULARITY MORE PEOPLI BUY CHEVROLETS THAN ANY OTHER CAR! Again this year—as in every single postwar year — more people are buying Chevrolels than any other car. In fact, latest official registration figures show Chevrolet over 25% ahead of the second- place car. Nearly 2 million more people now drive Chev* rolet than any other make. *Dplinr,a} at txtra tost. Comliriatiom of Pou'tt^liJt autniTiiitic tr,inimiitinit an<! tn-b.fi, ''Blue-r-Umt" tngini 41'ail.tblt an "Tu-o-Tea" and Bel Air ioJfti only. Powir Stttriaf ti *v*it* SULLIVAN-NELSON CHEVROLET CO. 301 Wtst Walnut Phone 4578

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