Chicago Tribune from Chicago, Illinois on February 3, 1957 · 55
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Chicago Tribune from Chicago, Illinois · 55

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Chicago, Illinois
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Sunday, February 3, 1957
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55
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CANISIUS TOPS NOTRE DAME IN 2 OVERTIMES Gains 15th Victory in 17 Games, 84-89 Buffalo, Feb. 2 L Canitf us beat Notre Dame, 94 to 89, tonight in the closing seconds of double overtime to retain its standing among the top independent college basket ball teams of the country. A jump shot by Joe Leone gave Canisius the lead at 90 to 89 with 1:05 to play. Hank Nowak followed with a basket, and Leone clinched the game with a basket 25 seconds left John Smyth topped the scorers with 28 points and led the Notre Dame rally that sent the game into overtime. For Canisius, it was among the 15th victory in 17 games. 941 I Notra Dam T891 r r b f p MOTORS -i- TRAFFIC -:- HIGHWAYS Over the' Counter Securities t - PAN-AMERICAN HIGH WA Y PROGRESS Jctk.f S-13 3 prtnCT,f 1 2-2 6 Lot.c 1 1-3 4 Brtu.t 9 3-3 5 Mr-y.r 7 13-15 1 4 3-3 4 fiojek.g 0 0-0 0 J f . . ' ' CONDITION OF o Ny 3 ; ' Caribbean Sea the pan American highway t5KtU J . I'l' , IN CENTRAL AMERICA CTl ' Zft?nr : ' January I95T N5TBMU (l ScUuld lor 19571 .1 ; ' LEGEND PMlW IsCTjTfor 1957 1 PAVED ROAD " ' & SAlVADOBJNiffafe m WEATHW ROAD - I Tt bt imprvd $sfcf , L5aACB $ tiMiiHiitimm IMPASSABLE ROAD V " ' ' " 1957 I . f -sV ' '' flj - " Pacific Highway un- I V J UMMvs " eta construction to 1 VNj" bt completac! h l5 Pj"d"r ConsTructio liyjW j. j Darien Surv.y being mad ! U J- " Pan American Highway f'S 4 J ' " '.. ' Congresses under tho sponsor- T? lUnder Construction! iSAJ RAMON ' r . hp of the Organization el 0RiENTAT10NJ'"7 j Under Comtrol ' lmK Pacific Ocetm lUndor Consfructiol . lUndf Construct M Carthr.t 4 7-10 4 Hawkins,! 8 3-6 3 Smyth.e 0 10-134 Dv!n.i 9 6-9 3 Sullivan. f l l-o MorellU 0 0-0 rmiij.t o o-o 34 36-36 31 31 37-39 21 nre maae ana attempted. Haif-tim Canisuua, 40; Notre Dam. 38 f ff 'trlil i Il.l1rr.in mnA Cri. MARQUETTE WINS Milwaukee, Feb. 2 Special Marquette staved off a second half rally here tonicht be fore 5,100 to upset Bowling Green? 70 to 67, in a thrilling basketball came at Marauette The loss was only the fourth for the Falcons who came into the Marauette same with an 11 won and 4 lost record. The victory brought Marquette's record to 9-9 for the season Lineups: 5 3 9 1 3 a Clunf E'perier.f " Mor ail. e Suppetea-c 3- 6 3 ,7-10 3 -H4 4- 7 3 1-3 3 0-0 a Bowliac Greea f71 B P p CJU.I 10-0 1 uacn.r s 13-14 1 Rrttixe.e 1 0-0 S M ixm:a.f 8 3-6 4 siesinter.f o 0-0 1 Schwyn.f 1 3-3 a William,! 0 0-0 0 Abele.t 6 1-3 4 23 26-37 131 " 34 19-37 33 Tn throw mad n4 attempted. Palf time Marquette. 37; Bowline Green. Oiflciala; Worman Klei and Bed LllyQUlat. RanchersEnd Knights9 16 Game Streak Two years 2go the Milwaukee . Knights of the Indoo Fclo league started a winning streak that had reached 16 in a row. That string was snapped last night before 3,421 in the Chicago av. Armory when the Chicago Ranchers spilled them, 19 to 8, in the most exciting game of the season. Jack Ryan scored seven goals in leading the Hornets to a 13 to 4 victory over the Shamrocks in the second game. Ryan scored in every chukker as the Hornets pulled their season mark to 2 and 2. Lineups: Kitwukra .8J Zaactier 107 tfeoa Lackn;aa......f....... .George Cciilnla Fitly Stee.i... ...... ........Jerry Fordon Don McCarroll.....! .....At Klmmel Miiw.uk. ..3 a a l s Sancher 1 3 3 410 Scoruif Milwaukee: Luck man 3, Stevens 4. McCarroll. 1: Ranchers: Coklnls 4, ordon 3, aUnuael 4. Shamrock 4 Hornets ri 31 IVr-t Bunn ........F. ..... Paul Smith ton John Casey ......C. ...... Buster Mackey fat-Connors ......G. ........ Jack Ryan Scorint Shamrocks: Bunn, 1, Casey, 5. Connors, 1. Hornets: Smlthson, 3, Mackey, 4, Ryan. 7. tnamroci a 0 1 1 4 Hornet 5 3 3 313 NORTH CENTRAL BEATS CARROLL; SW AFFORD STAR Waukesha, 'Wis.,' Feb. 2 Special Dick Swafford scored 16 of his 18 point total in the second half as North Central college of Naperville, 111., came from behind to beat Carroll, 74 to 63, in a College Conference of Illinois basket ball game here tonight after trailing, 46 to 34, at half time. Porto Central 34 4074 Carroll 48 3369 Srorlnf NORTH CENTRAL: Shymke-wich. 3-3 (8; Armentrout, 3-0 (6J; Whatley. l-O 3 ; Tolmes. 5-3 13; . Swafford. 8-8 181: Baaiey. 5-4 14; C. 3-3 (6): Williams. 3-3 T J. CARROLL: Koverson. 9-3 301; John, on. 4-3 101: Moran, 3-1 71: Schretber. 4-8 161; Krause. 4-4 (13); Grohskopf, 1-0 2J; Lenracher. 1-0 3. KNOX COLLEGE BREAICS COE'S STRING,79T072 Galesburg, HI., Feb. 2 Special Knox college upset previously unbeaten Coe college, 79 to 72, tonight in a Midwest conference game. John Liston's 28 points paced the victory over Coe, which bad won 14 games in a row, rane in the conference. Sum- Map shows the completed sectors and the sectors under construction on the Pan-American highway in Central America. In three years, the route is to be opened from Mexico to South America. Map and information were furnished by the International Road federation at its convention in Chicago last week. . U.S. Road Billions Exceed World : manes: Coe ......... K3GX ...43 3973 .40 3979 Sccrtnf COE: Kupdnet. 3-1 7: Richard. 3-0 61: PurceU. 11-7 (29): Dlmond. 1-0 fSji 'Huff. 3-3 61: Black. 6-0 131; Amendt. 4-0 (8); Hoeppner. 1-0 121. fUiCX: Ustou. 8-10 26); Hoopes, 6-7 !191: La Guess, 3-3 8; Ohnen. 4-3 10; Slsemorc, 4-3 13; StoweU. 0-3 Fooled oot.' Pro Basketball NATIONAL LEAGUE WESTERN DIVISION , W. L. Prt. Ft. Ways 34 34 .300 St. Loats fc3 XS .479 Rochester 33 38 .440 Mlnaea. 30 28.408 CA3TESN DIVISION W. L. Ft. Bte 33 IS .607 rfellsdri. SO 34 .540 Kew Tark S3 24 .510 jraaaa 23 33.479 TESTEBDAT'S RESULTS t. iMis. 100; MinneapDlia, 97. rfctU4taia. 107; Syranm. 100, Kackaater, 93; Tt. Wayne, 79. Saataa, 114; New Tark. 111. GAMES TOPAI m Sachsaier at Boatots. , rtBsoatntial M Crackft. BY HAL FOUST In the United States, 7 bil lion 900 million dollars was spent for all highway purposes last year. In therest of the world, outside the United States and outside the iron curtain, the total was 5 billion dollars. The figures were re leased by the International Road federation last week at its convention in the Drake hotel. Canada ranked second, with 725 million dollars, followed by West Germany with 570 millions. Then came France at 471 millions; Great Britain, 278 millions; Italy,. 219 mil lions; Sweden, 200 millions, and Japan, 175 millions. Gain in Latin America The highest percentage gain for the year was registered by Latin America, a rise of 77.8 per cent to 622 million dollars. Cuba, which had been building at a rate of 5 millions a year, jumped expenditures to a quarter of a billion dollars for the 1956-'57 biennium. Costa Rica spent 10.5 millions in '56 as compared with 2.5 millions in '55. The Costa Rica work was mainly on the Pan-American highway. There are now 700 miles of Pan American highway under construction in Central America with contracts totaling 65 million dollars, the international federa tion reported. This sum represents 60 per cent of the 109.5 million dollar estimated cost of completing the 1,600 miles of highway from the Mexico-Guatemala border to the Panama canal in the next three years. See map illustrating how remote are hopes of driving from Chicago to South America. U. S. Assists in Projects "The United States," reported the International Road Federation, "is aiding the highway programs in 70 countries and territories in. Africa, South -Asia, the Middle East, Far East, and Europe. The assistance is financial, technical or material. ' "Engineering services, in cluding in some cases the ac tual management of highway programs and the organization of highway departments, are being provided in nearly 40 countries. In others, consult ing services only or assistance in the training of highway personnel are being given. Equipment and materials for road-building are being supplied to many , of the participating countries. "Projects in Guatemala, Bolivia, Chile, Thailand, and Viet Nam were greatly expanded in 1956, largely financed by the United States technical and economic aid funds. Programs of considerable size were continued in Liberia, Turkey, the Philippines, Paki- Driving Lesson ' 'MM Illinois state law says a motorist should use his horn only when reasonably necessary to insure safe operation, the Chicago Motor club told high school students in driver training last week. The law also says the horn must be capable of emitting a sound that normally could be heard at least 200 feet away. However, no horn should emit an unreasonably loud or harsh sound or whistle. Safe operation does not mean you are permitted to sound your horn at a pedes trian who happens to be crossing the street when the traffic light changes, or to signal a driver ahead to start moving. stan, Laos, Cambodia, Korea, Iraq, Egypt, and Lebanon. Aid in Varying Degrees Aid in varying degrees from engineer consulting work to supply of equipment was re ceived by Yugoslavia, Colom bia, Honduras, Paraguay, Haiti, Peru, Nigeria, the-Rhodesias, Spain, Israel, Jordan, and others. " New programs were being considered, meanwhile, in sev- eral countries which have received preliminary engineer consulting services including Afghanistan, Nepal, Indonesia, Ceylon, Kenya, Tanganyika, British Guiana, and Iran. "The Bureau of Public Roads was cooperating with the International Cooperation administration in a number of the projects. In addition, the Bureau of Public Roads con tinued independently on pro grams which receive alloca tions under United States highway legislation. These countries are Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicar agua, Costa Rica, and Panama, as well as the territories of Alaska, Hawaii, and Puerto Rico. Employ Road Specialists "The United States Inter national Cooperation adminis tration directly employs some 80 specialists on highways and highway transportation abroad, in addition to United States Bureau of Public Roads per sonnel and the hundreds of engineers and technicians en gaged by engmeer consulting and construction firms under contract in the overseas high way aid program. "Meantime, - highway and traffic personnel from more than 40 countries benefited from visits to the United States under the technical aid program in 1956." VOICE OF TRAFFIC TOWED AUTO Llndenwood, 111., Jan. 15 Perhaps you will be interested in the following experience I was subjected to today in the city of Chicago: Last night I stayed in a hotel at 53d and Lake Park and parked my car on the boulevard in the 5200 block as many other cars were. This morning upon leaving the hotel, I discovered my car was gone and when I went to the police station to report it stolen, I learned it had been towed away for a parking violation. There were other cars parked in the same block both when I parked and when I went to leave. The police at 53d st. sent me to the park district station at 57th and Cottage Grove, where I paid a $10 fine No. 123396 for ticket No. P230149 which was neither on 'the car nor given to me. When I inquired why the fine was that high I was told it was because of snow removal charges. I had parked in last week's snow which was several inches to a foot deep and none of this had been removed later in the day. I was told I could get my car at 76th and Halsted, and when I inquired about the distant location I was told it was that of the "official" towing company for the park police. At that address I paid the Giant Auto Construction Works $9.25 for towing and $1.25 for storage. Then I was told I would find my car at another location, 74th and Laflin, in a parking lot I showed my receipt to the attendant, who couldn't' find the car in that lot. After some checking I was told I could find it at 1414 E. 50th st 'I finally found it there in front of a school a few blocks from where the violation occurred. After about four hours of searching at two police stations and three other locations I found that I had paid $10 for a simple parking violation and paid a total of $10.50 for towing my car a few blocks and " storing it on a public street! When I called the towing com pany to see about getting some "storage" refund, I was given the story that the manager, an individual 'named Edwards, was out and to stop back some other time. I then called the park police station to see if they would use any influence with their "official" towers to at least refund the "storage" charges. There again the patrolman who issued my receipt had just left, and the sergeant said they had nothing to do with charges other than the fine. This appears to be collusion in fleecing motorists. I wonder how the city's official towing companies are "selected." HOWARD HEDTKE The following fives the bid and asked range of a representative country-wide list of securities traded over the counter. The list is furnished by the National Association of Securities Dealers. , . INDUSIBIALS AND UTILITIES AmerExp ArlzPubSerr BerkHathaway CdnDelhiPetrol AztecOll&Gas CdnSupOUCal CentralMePwr Bid 33H SVt 8V4 8y Ask 3514 25 9H 19l 30 17V4 18 ColoInterstatGas 75 ColoOll&Gas CopelandRefrlf DelhlTaylorOU ElPasoElrc GasService GiantfrtldCem 18"4 15 )4 43 24 19 63 23 78 19 1 15V4 46 26 31 65 38 52 48 89 Eld GulflnterstateGas 9 Ask 1C 79 72 24 26 37 27 39 7 32 30 BankersTrKY BkotAmNt&StSF 36 ChaseManhNY 49 ChCornExchNY 45 ContlllNBChio 85 IstBkStkCorpMpI 33 35 AetnaFire 71 74 AetnaLlfe - - 177 184 AmlnsofNewark 27 29 Fire-Sins ofNewk 36, 38 HugotonProd 76 IdealCement 69 KalserSU P 23 KyUtll 25 LondStarStl - 26 MntnFuelSupplj 26 NorlndPubServ 37 NwestPrCor 7 PaclficPwrAI.t 30 PloneerNatGas - 28 PotashCoofAmer - 37 40 PubSvcofNewM :14 15 RareMetalsotAm 4 .5 BANKS lstNatlCitylTx, 66 69 IstNatlBsn 67 70 IstNatlChgo "sio 320 IstPaBkjPhllt 45 48 GuarTrustNY 71 74 IrvlnrTrustNY 33 35 - INSURANCE STOCKS r FrankllnLile 96 100 GreatAmer ... 36 38 GulfLlle 30 32 HartfordFlre 142 148' MIDWEST REGION RepublNatGas RockwellMfgCo SoColoPower SoUnlonGas TennGasTrans TexasGasTrana Tlmelnc TransctGasPlpe USBoraxA-Chem UtdUtlls WesternLtA-Tel WestemNatGas WiaPwr&Lt . Bid 36 45 "14 27 31 23 68 18 44 20 32 12 26 Ask 39 49 15 38 32V, 34 72 19 48 31 34 13 28 . 33 35 S3" 57 45 48 VaWatlPhoenll .29 31 MfrsTrustNY RepNatlDalla SecIstNatlLA HomelnsNY 43 46 MdCasualtyBalt, .35 37 4 8 8 30 50 26 15 Aerovox Alrtex Products AllenRCBusMch AirtexProduct P AUtsLouls AmerFumMart AmerHalrA-Felt AmerHcupSupply 30 AmerMarletta 48 AmerRockWool AmerServlce AmerWindGI p AmpcoMetals " ApexSmeltlng AmphenolElec AnheuserBusch ArcadyFannsMlIl Baxter Lab Beam JamesDls Bell&Gossett BirtmanElectrl BowaterPaper Bowserinc BrunjngChasCo Burgess Battery CanJavalinLtd CaspersTinFlatt CecoSteel CenElec&Gas CenFlbreProd CenlllElec&Gaa CenSoya CenTelephone CenSteel&WIrt ChgAurora&El ChgDailyNews ChgMlllALum . ChgMolderProd ClarkOll&Refnr ColonlalAccept A CollinsRadlo'A' Do'B' ComblnedLsP A ConnCGLtd ConcWatPw&Pa CookCoffee CookElectrlc CornellPapProd CoryCorp CreameryPkMfg Crlbben&Sexton Do p CrossCo CurtisCompanles Helen eCurtisInd Chesapeakelndui GramptonMfg DanlyMachSpee DayBrlteUghtlng DeltaElectrlc ClassADunElect Do ClassB Eversharplnc P FearnFoods FedMach&Weld 10 6 17 7 S6 20 19 8 14 14 13 15 S 6 33 20 15 10 22 16 27 31 29 19 55 17 20 25 10 19 3 25 25 15 12 33 12 28 14 6 35 5 14 28 9 12 , 2 1 16 7 18 18 18 16 6 : 4 5 6 . 23 54 29 16 32 49 11 6 19 8 39 21 30 9 15 16 14 17 6 6 36 22 16 11 24 17 29 33 31 21 19 23 37 11 21 3 27 37 17 13 36 13 30 15 7 37 8 15 30 10 13 . 2 . 2 17 ' 8 19 20 19 18 7 4 INDUSTRIALS AND UTILITIES FedSlgnA-Slr 22 FedSlgn&Sig p 19 FooteBrosGear 18 FourCorsUranlum 4 FowlerHoslery "S Ftwaynecoxrrap ID FWlerMig - GetchellMlnei- GlddingsALewl! GlsholtMachCo HamtltonMfg HartCarterCa Haskellte 23 20 19 4 5 32 62 55 3 SS 37 17 16 10 - 7 HearstConsPubA 16 Higginslnc 1 HlnesEdLumber HublneerCo HugotonGasTrUU 9 IndlanaLiineston ' 6 InternUReflnlnt 3 InterstateBake Z0 IowaElL&P4.80p 49 JacobsonMigce 7 JamesMfgCo 19 JeffersonElectrlc 11s JohnaonSvcCo 46 JoslynMfgCo 44 Kalsersteel 43 Kearney ATrecker 10 KasCltyPSvc 5 p 45 Kelloggco KirschCo KwiksetLocksInc LakestdeLabs LakeSupDlsPow LOFGlassFlbers LlbertyLoan'A i Los An gTrsLtaeg LumlnatorHarr MacGregorSptPr 21 MacWhiteCo MastlcAsphalt MarmonHerrlng MartmontAutoPr 12 MattHeglerZlnq 24 MeyercordCo . i 6 MichGasA-Elee 47 MlddleStatesTel 18 Mlehle-Gress-Dez 26 MlllerMfg 4 NationalHomes'A' 16 29 19 18 11 - 8 IS 1 40 44 15 17 10 7 " 3 21 52 7 21 12 49 47 46 11 49 34 19 9 37 2 14 32 17 11 23 25 27 4 sy 32 18 8 34 24 13 30 16 13 AmNatBATCng 32S Bk of ComwDet 163 BoatmenBk StL 59 CentNatlBkChg ChgoNitlBk Do P ChgoTttle&Tr CltyBkofDetroit CltyNatB&TChf 18 85 28 87 25 62 335 178 20 89 39 89 27 65 AnAmUfeCa 4 8 AmFldel&Cas 25 27 AmMotorlnsCo 10 12 Tribune Special Ins List BenefldalStdUfe 17 18 Do 'B' 15 NatlTermlnals ' 18 Nekoosa-EdwPap 48 NoCenAirltnes 9 NorthShoreGat 16 NorthwestEngA 47 Do B '47 NWPubSve 16 NowestemStlAW 23 NuclearChgoCorp 6 NunnBushSho 16 OllgearCo 43 OIlnOAGCorp 18 OpelikaMfg 14 BANKS ClevelandTrCo 254 LaSalleNatBChg MfrNatB ofDet MercanNatBChf MdseNaBChgo ConnGenLife ContinentAssuf 113 121 ContlnentalCas 84 88 LlncolnNatlLife 217 227 TheTravelersIns 73 76 14 13 27y 7 497a 19 .28 4 17 16 20 62 e 17 51 61 17 25 7 18 46 20 15 272 PabstBreir 7 7 ParkerApplofClev 20 22 PeerlessCemCorp 33 "36 Pepsl-ColaGBtlrs 12 13 PettlbMullikenC 43 46 PheollMlgco 16 i Phillips Lamp 314 PlckeringLumbcr 12 PortElecTooU , 4 PortsmSUCorp : 16 Preway Ine , , , 8 PubcoPetroIeum . 5 Rob'nsAFryers. p 26 1 Roper Corp . 15 Rothmoor Corp 1 3 RRDonnelly v 25 SchieldBantanCo 12 SchoUHomesInc 6 Schuster Co SealedPwrCorp Searle SecAcceptCorp SignoleStlStp p ShakespeareCo SktlCorp ShellTrATReg SivyerStlCastgs Shulton A Do B SkllesCilS.OOCT.p 5 Smlth-Kltne-Frn 53 Snap-onTlsCorp 43 SpragueElectnc SWLumberMllla SWNaturalGas 5 So'west'nElecSve 19 StdMilllngA 3 DOB sa StaleyAB 24 StratMaterlals 24 SteepRklrMlnef 19 SusquehannaCorp 8 Tampaxlnc 35 TexEastemTmf 26 TexIllNatlGas 20 Tbomaslndustlnc 13 tXtjiraja 0tm2iag Uxfaint " ' February 3, 1957 r Fart 2 Page 7 INVESTING COMPANIES i Tokheim TranterMfgCo Uarco Advancedlnd UtdPrtsAPubg UtdStkydsp: Vendo Corp War-BrdshwExp WecoProducts . WellsGardnerCo WestOhloGaa WestTlAStmpg 33 13 5 17 5 28 16 3 27 13 6 18 ,17 38 10 23 29 21 is" 18 6 67 46 33 36 10 11 B 21 4 4 26 25 31 9 38 27 22 14 29 AberdeenFd A.ffillatedFd AmBuslnessShri AmMutualFd AssocFdTrust AtomDevMut AxeHoughtFd A Do B Do Stock AxeScienceA-Xl BlalrHoldlngs BlueRidgeMut BondlnvTrAm BostonFd BroadStlnveat BuUockFd CalifFd CanadaGenFd CanadlanFd CdnlntGrowth CapitalVenture CenturyShrsTr ChemlcalFd Colonial Fd Com within vest Do Stock CompositeB&S Do Fund , , Concord Fd ConsInvestTr CrownWInvDiy deVeghMutFd DelawareFd Diverse rowth. Do Invest Do Trust E - DivideRdShares DreyfusFd EatonAHowBal Do Stock 16 16 36 9 47 31 26 21 23 16 16 Bid 1.54 6.77 3.77 8.09 1.52 15.69 5.63 7.99 3.72 9.92 3.12 11.16 20.79 15.21 21.33 12.53 6.94 13.17 19.56 7.42 5.39 22.22 15.23 9.78 8.94 12.25 17.74 15.33 13.71 16.62 6.52 63.50 10.64 12.28 8.78 15.64 2.63 8.55 21.43 20.19 Electronicslnvest 4.81 EquityFd Fidelity Fi -. .- ; FirstBoston FoundersMutFd FrankcusCSer Do p - FundmntallnT GasIndustFd GeneralCapltal GenlnvestorsTr GrSecAutomob Do Aviation Do Building ' Do Cap Grth 6.84 14.94 3.82 64.25 7.53 '9.98 6.80 15.68 14.55 11.99 7.19 8.96 11.71 6.08 8.41 Ask 1.70 6.25 4.03 8.84 1.67 17.11 6.12 8.68 4.07 10.78 3.50 12.13 22.35 16.44 23.06 13.74 7.58 14.24 21.16 8.11 5.90 24.02 16.47 10.62 9.73 13.32 19.29 18.67 14.82 18.12 7.13 67.00 11.69 13.46 9.62 17.70 2.89 9.29 23.91 21.59 5.26 7.09 15.07 4.18 57.50 8.18 10.94 7.46 17.18 15.90 12.96 7.82 9 83 12.82 6.67 9.22 Bid Do Chemical 11.21 Do Stock - 11.24 Do Electronics. 6.70 Do Food 5.75 - Do Fully Adm 8.61 Do Gen Bond 8.17 Do Indus Men 14.69 Do Inst Bond 8.5 Do Merchand Do Muling Do Petrol Do RR Bond Do RR Equip Do RR St Do Steel ' Do Tobacco ' Do Utilities GrwthlndusSht GuardianMut HaydockFd HudsonFd IncomeFoundFd IncomeFdBojt Incorporatedlne . Do Investors InitltBankFd "Do FoundFd , Do GrowthFd Do Income Fd Do Insur Fd . IntlResourcesFd InvestCoAmer InveatTrBoston JohnstonMut KeystoneCusBl DQ B2 Do B3 . DO B4 . Do Kl - DOK2 j Do SI ( Do S2 i Do S3 Do S4 10.05 8.79 11.65 2.63 6.07 9.84 17.33 4.13 8.77 14.87 16.38 24.50 15.36 2.46 10.46 8.70 9.09 10.72 10.46 10.80 7.07 12.09 4.85 9.11 10.12 20.60 24.74 24.27 17.28 10.39 8.55 12.02 15.32 11.32 13.67 9.51 KeystoneFdCan 11.65 Knickerbocker 6.03 LexlngtonTrFd 11.32 Llfelnturlnvest 14.37 .; Do Stock 5-49 LoomisSayMut 42.00 ManagFdAuto 5.19 Do Electric 2.41 Do Gen Indust 3.82 Do Metal 3.43 Do Paper 3.99 Ask 12.28 12.31 7.36 6.31 9.44 8.93 16.08 8.91 11.01 9.63 12.76 2.90 6.66 10.78 18.96 4.54 9.61 15.33 16.88 24.50 16 61 2.69 11.43 9 51 9.83 11.73 11.44 11.82 7.74 13.22 5.33 9.95 11.06 20.60 25.82 26.48 18.85 11.34 9.34 13.12 16.72 12.35 14.91 10.38 12 60 6.61 12.37 15.37 6.98 42.00 5.71 2 66 4.21 3.78 4,40 DoPetro! Do Special DoTrana MchatBondFd MassInvTrut Do Growth MassLlfeFd MutlnvestFd MutualSU.-es MitualTru5t Nat-WideSecur NatlInvstors NatSecSerBaian Do Bond Do Div Do p Do Income Do Stock Do Growth NewEnglandFd NCEShares Philadelphia PlneStFd PioneerFd ' PrlceTRGrowth PurltanFd PutnamGeoFd , Sd&Nuclear ScudderF-ICao ScudderStACl Do Stock SelectedAmShr SharehldrsTr SmlthEdsonB Sowest Invest Soveretenlnvest StateStlnvest StelnR&FFd SterlincInvFil TelevEiectFd Templet nnGCaa TexsFd UtdAccumFd UtdContFd UtdlncomeFi UtdScienceFd UtdFdCanada ValueLlneFd Do Income Fd Do Spl Sit VanStrumAT WashMutlnvcst WellingtonFd WhltehailFd WiJconslnfNl ' Bid 3.21 2.74 3.17 7.26 11.06 10 25 37.60 9.32 14.73 3.34 18.42 9.55 10.40 6.49 4 64 8.29 6.06 8 66 6.30 20 04 9.20 17.66 21.40 14.2.5 29.48 6.53 12.24 11.15 46.37 34.76 22.70 8.62 11.04 13.65 11.83 13.14 39.25 28.50 11.09 11.54 21.75 8.09 J0.97 7.96 9.80 10.52 16.30 6.03 6 64 2.69 10.85 8.58 12 77 11.5 6.03 Ask 3.54 3.03 3.49 7.08 11.98 11.08 40.65 10.23 14.73 3.63 1S.S3 10.32 11.37 7.09 5.07 9.06 6.62 9.48 6.89 21.68 10 05 19.27 21.61 15.43 29.78 7.06 13.30 12.12 48.62 34 7 22.70 9.32 11.93 14.96 12. B3 13.29 41.75 2F 50 11.73 lies 23.7-S 8.84 112 S.70 10.65 11.50 17.72 6 59 6.16 2.94 11.82 9 36 13.92 12.43 6.43 28 2 3 63 56 2 8 15 15 3 11 13 17 15 WesthauserTmbr 36 WhitingCorp WdwrdGovCo Yard-Manlnc ZelglerClACokt ZonoliteCa 16 33 7 20 2 3 9 16 16 3 11 14 18 16 39 17 36 8 22 3 44 47 440 460 131 ... 350 ... 64 67 43 46 47 50 25 27 STOCKS 257 268 NatSecBk of Chg 63 65 NorthTrCoChgo 405 430 SearsBk&TrCo 70 77 StLUnlonTrCo 78 83 UnlonBComCleve 44 47 UppAveNatBCh 103 109 UptownNatBChg 68 60 NoAmUfelnsCo 19 21 NorthwestNIMil 68 73 United InsCoAm 22 24 WestCas&Surety 30 ... 623 FINALISTS IN 1956 BRAND NAMES CONTEST Finalists in the 1956 Brand Name Retaile r-of-the-Year competition were announced by the Brand Names Foundation. Judging will take place March 6 thru 8 and the awards will be made at a dinner in New York City May 3. Among the 623 . qualifiers are: Edward Gee company. General Camera company, Horder'a, Inc., Olsen A Ebann Jewelry company. Polk Brothers, and Lytton's, Henry C. Lytton & Co.. all of Chicago, and Joseph Shalon Shoes, Evanstcn. i . CM. EMPLOYES POCKET $49,621 FOR 1,292 IDEAS Chicago area employes of General Motors corporation received $49,621 last year for 1,292 suggestions accepted un der the G. M. suggestion plan, j the company announced yesterday. In the United States and Canada awards totaling $3,079,571 were paid for 55,338 suggestions which were accepted. A total of 224,796 suggestions were submitted. WEEKLY GRAIN TABLE Wheat High Low Oct. 9 Oct. 9 March ...$2.40 $2.33 $2.34 $2.40 May 2.37 2.30 2.30 2.37 July 2.28 2.22 2.23 2.29 Season's range: March $2.45-$2.06, May $2.44-$2.08, July $2.34-$2.12. Corn March ...$1.34 $1.31 $1.31 $1.34 May 1.37 1.34 1.34 1.38 July 1.40 1.37 1.37 1.40 Season's range: March i.si-i.si. May $1.61-$1.34, July si.S2ft-i.37ft. March ...S .79 S .77 .77 I .79 May. 77; .75 .76 .77 July .70 .68 .69 .71 Season' range: March .82-.68, May 82-.73, JUly .7 7-. 6 8s, Rye March ...$1.45 $1.37 $1.38 $1.44 May 1.47 1.39 1.40 1.47 July 1.46 V 1.38 1.39 1.45 Season's range: March $1.66-$1.23, May $1.66-$1.39. July $1.60-$1.38. BoyDeanc March ...$2.52 $2.47 $2.49 $2.51 May ..... 2.53 2.48 2.49 2.52 July -2.49 2.44 2.46 2.48 Season's range: March $2.68-$2.37, May $2.69-$2.40. July $2.66.-$2.43. PRIMARY GRAIN Receipts and shipments at leading west- em markets 000 omitted: Receipts Wheat Com Oats This week 5,956 9.448 1,548 Last Week 6,876 8,897 1,895 Last year 6,045 4,621 1,611 Shipments ' - . This week 4,334 5,516 987 Last week 3,824 4,576 1,427 Last year 3,266 2,385 867 PUBLIC AUTHORITY BONDS Issue, Rate, Maturity Chicago Transit Auth. 8 78 Do 4 83 Chicago Reg. Ft. Dls. 4 95. Florida Turnpike 3 95.... Great New Orleans Exp. 4 94 Illinois Toll Road 3 95.. Indiana Toll Rd. Com. 3 94 Kansas Turnpike 3 94.... Kentucky Turnpike 3.40 94.. Mackinac Bridge 4 94 Mass. Turnpike 3.30 94.... New Jersey Turnpike 3 88.. New York Pow. Auth. 3.20 9S New York Thruway 3.10 94. Ohio Turnpike 3 92...... Penn. Turnpike 3 82...... Texas Turnpike 2.70 80.... Virginia T. Rev. 3 94 West Va. Turnpike 4 89.. West Va. Turnpike 3 89.. Bid Ask 84 86 95 97 88 90 89 91 92 94 88 90 89 91 79 81 86 88 98 100 89 91 92 94 95 97 97 99 90 92 90 92 85 87 89 91 61 63 57 69 OUTSIDE LIVE STOCK Kan. City . Omaha .... St. Louis .. St. Joseph Sioux City . St. Paul .. Indiana polii Pittsburgh . Buffalo .... Cincinnati . Cleveland . Average ... Nominal. Mora Saturday Friday .$19.00 $19.00 . 19.00 19.00 . 19.25 19.25 . 19.00 19.00 . 19.00 . 19.00 19.15 . 19.50 . 20.00 . 18.50 . 19.25 . 19.15 19.00 19.00 19. IS 19.50 20.00 18.50 19.25 19.15 Wk. ago $19.00 19.25 '19.00 19.00 19.25 19.00 18.75 19.25 20.25 18.75 19.25 19.1S Yr. ago $13.75 14.00 14.25 14.25 13.85 13.75 14.25 14.75 15.50 14.00 14.25 14.25 Prime-Domestic WIDE FLANGE BEAMS Large Quantifies Available for IMMEDIATE DELIVERY 2i"62 21" 68 21" 73 18" 55 18" 60 (55' te 60' Lengths) Call Harry Mokata INTERNATIONAL ROLLING MILL PRODUCTS CORP. 5000 S. Whipple, Chicago - HEmlock 4-5200 Authorized Garages'Tows Soar Towing of disabled automobiles by eight authorized garages in the "pity increased 16.5 per cent during 195G, figures released yesterday by the motor vehicle records section show. The records section, also called the towing control unit, was set up April 1, 1955, following charges by the Chicago Crime commission that many policemen steered the lucrative towing business caused by auto accidents to favored garages and tow truck operators. Set Tow, Storage Rates Garages authorized to handle police tows are permitted to charge motorist $10.50 for tows, and $1 a day for storage. Traffic poce may suggest f h sTV?re At rti rinrfrpH cap. ages only if asked for advice by motorists requiring tows, said Police Capt Thomas M. Lowery, head of the records section. In case where a driver is injured and unable to order a tow, police are instructed to notify the central complaint room, which calls the nearest . authorized garage. -. A total of 29,855 autos were towed last year by authorized and nonauthorized garages. The percentage of authorized tows rose from 59 in January 1956 to 75.5 in December. About one auto needed towing for every three accidents reported to city police. Most Damaged Tows Capt. Lowery attributed the greater use of authorized garages to growing familiarity of policemen with the new system of calling for tows thru the complaint room. Of the autos towed, about 99 per cent were damaged in accidents. The remainder included abandoned autos and cars left too long in no parking zones. The total of 29,855 tows does not include 9,806 made in the Loop area during 1956. , Cars are towed in the Loop chiefly for illegal parking. They are taken by bureau of. sanitation trucks to the auto pound at 11 W. Wacker dr. ... Check on Garages The control unit operates three police cars which check on tows by authorized and nonauthorized garages each day to make sure the autos arrive where registered in police records. OFFICE SPACE SOCONY MOBIL BUILDING 59 E. Van Buren St. 3,900 sq. ft. .16th Floor Reasonable Rental Remodeling to Sui$ Fluorescent Lighting Acoustic Ceilings Immediate Occupancy Owner Management SOCONY MOBIL BUILDING 59 E. VAN BUREN ST. "AN ADDRESS OF DISTINCTION" Room 1118 WAbash 2-5263 ) tie L FLORIDA FACTS W edit twice monthly Fsrts Newsletter on Florida covering- economies, trends, Und raliiee, business opnortunitiet the down-to-earth facts for banks and businessmen. The regular price Is S6.00 annually and to in-traduce the tetter. Sl.M (or two Booths. Sample copies sent free. . vJUOBIDA FACTS 1 fla f tree . SsrtsoU.. Tlorlds FOR LEASE 35 Acre. On Waterway 11 miles from Chicago Loop, excellent Tall connections, directly accessible to highwaya. Especially suitable for warehousing light manufacturing truck traosportatioB facilities. STATES WIDE INDUSTRIAL 8T0RA6E AND TRANSPORTATION COMPANY SMI W. 15th St. Cleera 59. HI. OLjmpis S-8783. nhsil I-J5U Si GAS WORKERS' STRIKE ENDED IN WISCONSIN Racine, Wis.,. Feb. 2 Wi Workers of Wisconsin Natural Gas company voted 122 to 67 today to accept a two year contract and end a strike which began Jan. ,25 over wage demands. , ' , The vote was announced by Walter Smigun, ; president of Local 12005, United Mine Workers, District 50, who said the 240 workers would be back on the job Monday morning in the eight southeastern Wisconsin communities served by the firm. Smigun said the new pact called for an average wage increase of 9.9 cents per hour for the first year and 8 cents for the second, plus other benefits. The average wage before the strike was $2.21 hourly. CHICAGO LIVE STOCK Comparative Prices per 100 Pounds HOGS Receipts, 3.000; shipments. 500. Bulk of sales.... $17.00-18.25 Month ago 16.25-17.50 Year ago 12.00-13.75 Top yesterday. $18.75; average, S17.85. CATTLE Receipts, 100; shipments. 100. Bulk of sales 17.50-21.00 Month ago 18.00-241.75 Tear ago 16.00-19.00 1 Top yesterday, $22.50; average, S1U.25. SHEEP Receipts, 100; shipments. 100. Bulk of sales $18.00-20.50 Month ago 17.50-19.50 Year ago 19.50-20.25 ' Top yesterday, $20.5'0; average, $19.50. Receipts Included 1,800 hogs direct to packers. Yesterday prices nominal. ' PORTABLE HEAT Safe, Portable Industrial Heat "LOW COST HEAT : WHERE YOU NEED IT". This is actually a portable forced air furnace. It circulates warm air inside a room or building r does "spot" heating outside. It burns inexpensive kerosene or fuel oil so completely that it leaves no dangerous fumes, need no vent. 110-115 voit current ignites the fuel and runs the blower. Safe, lightweight, effective. Costs only 12c per hour to run.' - MASTER VIBRATOR DIST. CO. t ; , 5823 W. NORTH AVE. I Chicago, Illinois. . , i BZ 74883 , Surplus Complets with 6x4 Card Holders Practically Hew 22 Slides Substantially Constructed in Steel The Ideal Cabinet for INVENTORY CONTROL" PRODUCTION CONTROL CUSTOMER'S RECORD SALES CONTROL LEDGER CONTROL PAYROLL RECORD CHURCH RECORD Other Sizes and Types Available. mt) mm) a G -i ' ear . j VCOST J73.7S sVICU . CAP. 1474 Finiehad li Grain tr Phent Wirtvr WriU sea arnrneirr HSshstsssssSsHlsflsssI Esther VJiliioms Swimming PqqI Exclusive Distributorships Choice markets still open. Really big profits possible this year. Sensational national TV, radio, magazine and newspaper advertising makes this the most valuable franchise in the booming swimming pool business. No construction experience necessary. Five figure investment required, varying with area potential, for self-liquidating stock. Internationol Swimming Pool Corp. M Court Stra.t, Whit Plains, N. Y. Exclusive Manufacturers of tha World-Famous Esther Williams Pools Mia y C 1; ' Moasakatytn ) ; ErrWiUnSll tir Home ' All concrete, complete with iinrst equipment. Several sizes. Good Housekeeping Guaran- . tee seal assures highest . quality aod immediate ' consumer aceepunce. FOR SALE 270 ACRES (700 BUILDING SITES) FOR QUALIFIED PURCHASER. ALL IMPROVEMENTS AVAILABLE. EXCELLENT SELLING LOCATION IN WESTERN SUBURBS. MUST BE IMMEDIATE ACTION. $1,900.00 PER ACRE CONTACT TRISUNS. MBE 128 G E VI ROR BLADES! SINGLE EDGE PACKS OF S Pack-marked 'U. S. Armed Forces' 30 stacks to corf on SO tartans $2.40 star eta. 120 tartans $2.25 par tta. 480 tartans $2.15 Mr tta. 2008 aartass ....$2.04 aar sta. F. 0. B. N. Y. Columbia Surplus Company SS Cast Ittk SL.1 N Yarit (. H. V. CHOICE BUSJKESS 10CATI0. In . f" Drwntown Bockford, Illinois " . ' 125 Nwtn Churtn 8traet rsnnarly Cluln Stort Oi-tuptrt Whs Has Canttructss! Thtir Ova BulKtni ; T8 8try and Basnnant L. Shaped Bmldim 4 Faot Franlaaa by !5 Faat L'an 66 Fatt Width la Raar .- 0,000 8. Ft. Eath Floar Basemant. -Firat and Sesaad Flaars Fraisht Elavatsr Idaal far Dtawrtment Stvra. Fnraitnra. Raady to Waar 8t.r. Eta. ' Will DWId ta Suit - MAX LIEBUHG v iSf t. Mail it, Roekfara. lli'p T 1

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