Carrol Daily Times Herald from Carroll, Iowa on November 27, 1970 · Page 21
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Carrol Daily Times Herald from Carroll, Iowa · Page 21

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Carroll, Iowa
Issue Date:
Friday, November 27, 1970
Page:
Page 21
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Junior Editor Ouii on- LANGUAGES Daily Times Herald Features . . . Comics OUT OUR WAY By NIG COCHRAN OUR lOARDINt HOUSf . . . w«Hi . . . MAJOR HOOPLI Friday, November 27, 1970 Romanticism Answer to Previous Puzzle raj QUESTION; How did the U.S.A. decide what language to use? ANSWER: To arrive at an understanding of how languages came to America from the old world, we have made a map of the first explorers, the men who claimed parts of the new continent on behalf of the older nations they represented. The Vikings landed on our shores around 1000 A.D., but since they did not make permanent settlements they don't come into our story. Christopher Columbus, trying to get to the riches of the East, thought he had succeeded when he landed in the West Indies in 1492(3). He claimed the land for Spain. Other Spanish explorers, landing in Mexico and Central America, established settlements. Since these people all spoke Spanish, it became the language of the Spanish part of America, even when the Spanish colonies broke away from Spain. In the same way, English and French both stand as official Canadian languages because the land was discovered by explorers from both countries, among others John and Sebastian Cabot (1) for England and Champlain (2, black arrow) for France. Settlements were made by both countries. England based her claims to the land further South, now the U.S.A., on the Cabots' voyages, and many settlements were made; so now we speak English. (Mary Finch of Dover, Delaware, wins a prize for this question. You can win $10 cash plus AP's handsome World Yearbook if your question, mailed on a postcard to Junior Editors in care of this newspaper, is selected for a prize.) TIZZY By Kate Osann ACROSS 1 German classic writer 7 English poet, Lord 12 Moved more speedily 13 Cricket line 14 Flight of steps (Pi.) , 15 Intimated 116 Consequently 17 Operatic heroine 18 Gridiron, sound 19 Immerse 20 That girl 23 Chalcedony 25 English poet, John • 27 Crony (coll.) '30 Archaic pronoun ; 31 Awn • 32 Wing-footed ! 34 "Peach State" •; 0 »b.) I 35 Chop ! 36 Resolute 37 French writer, Victor 39 Reply (ab.) 40 Gadget used by golfers 41 Elevator cage 44 Practical joke 46 19th-century French novelist 48 Gather speed (2 words) 51 Irish Shakespearean scholar 52 Provoke 53 Kite 54 Sharp aches 55 Coalesces DOWN" 1 Exclamation. 2 External 3 Babylonian eagle rider 4 Hair (comb, form) 5 Rodent 6 Half-ems! 7 Hat part 8 Siberian river 9 Plague carrier 10-Chemical suffix 11 Man's nickname 13 Fragment 17 Stir 19 Colored 21 Jumble 22 Diminutive suffix 24 Russian veto 25 Jorgen,- sen rifle 26 Noticed 27 Dance step 28 Canadian province (at.) 29 Symbol of Great Britain 31 Malarial fever 33 Russian classic 37 Bewitch. 38 Visual _ 40 Recording device 42 Preposition 43 Hindu queen 45 Scoreboard notation 46 Small valley 47 Coteries 48 Playing card spot 49 Girl's name 50 201 (Roman) 51 Hebrew letter I'M GROWING PAINT — DON'T LET VOUR FELLOWMAN DIE OR STARVATION! — ' OUICK!.. LEND ME A BUCK. FOR A &IT OR LUNCH — SASP-Jfc-BEFORE IT'^-'-TOO •LATE — LUNCH !.'., Y&EEN EATING YOUR.-? ALL MORNING .' THAT ACTS WEARINS THIN 1 . YOU'VE GOTTA CO,\\E UP WITH A BETTER &IAAAAICK. FOR A BUCK! I PONT KNOW WHAT& WCTOE,. LENPING HIK\ LUNCH MONEY OR (SIVlNG HliV\ PART OR YOURS. EITHER WAY YOU LOSE.' z AMOtf ». HOOPLS, t POUMC* THUS Gw>et*- FOP * Afu«wsy IN Mouta. ftoCKST/ u >im*rtxi pu=A*e BXPLAIW HOW THAT 9W> cSoT OJ oopi TASILE rfypo NEVER \A*NT NEAR -TH6 MAP^T? 1 P1PNT H6AJ*.*3Ll PHONE IT IN/ MY UJORC? MARTHA, I VUAS...ER, AH... PELA -Yet? sv BUSINESS APPOINT/VENTS / X MATURAL.LV A ^SUMEP THAT YoU MAC? UELeCTEP IT, PARTtCULAPZ-LY" WH6M IT WAS. «SO EXCELLENT.' SHORT RIBS By FRANK O'NEAL 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 H 17 18 • 20 21 22 23 24 • 26~" 27 28 29 • 30 • 32 33 • 34 • 35 36 H37 38 39 • 40 4, 42 43 44 45 H46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 27 <H£ VVMIT£ MAN JS COMING/ PASS IT ON. r "fia0UBLE PASS ' : is comuGi} IT ON. J THE FLINTSTONES ly HANNA-BARIERA PRISCILLA'S POP By AL VERMEER CARNIVAL By Dick Turner "It doesnt' sound like anything Mozart ever committed!" HEAVEN MUST, WONDER! h-rHOLLYHOCK! ' 9 ALLEY OOP By V. T. HAMLIN WHAT'S HAPPENING TO \ I DUNNO, UMPA, SOME OF POC THEM, GUZ? THEY'RE J WONMUG'S MAGIC,MOST LIKELY/ 'The way I get it, the job is for us to gain equality with men without surrendering any of our superiority!" WINTHROP By DICK CAVALLI

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