The Malvern Leader from Malvern, Iowa on February 8, 1934 · Page 6
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The Malvern Leader from Malvern, Iowa · Page 6

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Malvern, Iowa
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Thursday, February 8, 1934
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Page 6
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PAGE SIX fttt. MALVfcttfT MALVERfr, tOWA, FfeftftUAftt 6. 1934 ¥ • r< MILLS COUNTY FARM BUREAU NEWS Phow« 244 Bnrcc It. Kflpntrtc*. Agent. Miss M»t«1 Berry, Protection . 4t Clftrttidft February T&e Meeting to dtecum the Faftn Cfedft Administration program lot thd organization of a Prodaetioij Credit association to sertc the fanners of Adams, Fre- inoftt, Mills, Montgomery, Page *ftd Taylor counties, #111 be hela at 10 a. m. In the library tmse- inent at Clarinda. P«b. 10. A representative of the Production Credit Corporation ol Omaha will fee present to conduct this tfieetln*. Study Helps for Beautifying Home Lesson on Applied Given in Home Furnishing Course The next training school in the fourth year home furnishing project will he held for local farm Bureau women In Mills county the week of Feb. 12 by Miss Nora Workman, extension specialist In home furnishing in the extension service at Iowa State college. In these training schools applied design, or the application of principles governing the orderly arrangement of material, will be studied. Principles governing the size and shape, coloring, texture, and outline of the object will be Considered. Miss Workman points out that one need not be born with talent to develop an appreciation and understanding of art. The understanding of certain fundamental principles will help homemakers develop more beautiful and pleas- Ing, more satisfying furnishings. How to apply principles of harmony, balance, proportion, rhythm, and emphasis will be explained by Miss Workman. Local leaders who attend this series of training schools will hold follow-up meetings in their school districts at which women Interested may secure this information. The next training school lesson, which is the third of the fourth year home furnishing course, is scheduled to be held at the following places on the designated dates: Monday, Feb. 12, at the home of Mrs. Ralph May, Tuesday, Feb. 13, at the home of Miss Helen Buch. , Wednesday, Feb. 14, at the • home of Mrs. Ernll Leu. : Thursday, Feb. 15, at the home Of Mrs. Henry Nims. Friday, Feb. 16, at the home of Mrs. Earl Keast. Leaders of Home Project Attend Training School Local leaders from St. Marys, Plattville, and Glenwood townships assembled at the Louis Rodman home near Glenwood Monday, Jan. 22, for the second lesson of the fourth year home furnishing course. Block printing was the theme for the day and many beautiful effects were planned and worked out. This work is made the more interest- Ing by the fact that original designs and application can be carried out to fit any desired color scheme or type of room in materials ranging from the lowly flour sack to the finest silk or velvet. Follow-up meetings will be held in the various townships and every woman will be well repaid by attending. Corti-Hog Control Association Formed Any Person Who tta* Sigfted Contract is a Meifioer Articles of association for the county corn-hog control association, now being distributed by county agents, provide for local administration of the corn-hog program In cooperation with the government, according to County Agent Brnce M. Kilpatrlck. Any person who has signed a corn-hog contract and accepted the adjusted figures Is a member of the association, Mr. Kilpatrlck explained. There are no membership dues, he added, and each member la entitled to one vote. In explaining the articles of association Mr. Kilpatrlck said that the association will consist of a board of directors consisting of the chairman of each township committee. The board of directors will elect from Us membership a examining fartts ttfttf*f eottti*et,' when necessary. tteftftttrfttft ftet«s, marking for Identification, »M determining the atttimfffn o* contracted acreage, and tt*fl*et- Ing and counting nerds <rf togs. An association may tnefirde two or more counties, aceotdlng to the article*, but where two o* more counties set up a Wftgle association they f til nar« a jfetet board of directors which wttl elect « single set of officers a single allotment committee. Federal Iturmtie Tax Parted ftfr t«^t_|iBMMfr 1 Id ttftft* ifc, i«$i president of the association who i Kentlemaa explained that he was shall also be chairman of the a "Idler of f^" 6 .' " F county allotment cdmmittee. A " hcr ' * n * world traveler. School for Girls' 4-H Club Leaders Miss Irma Garner, home furnishing specialist, will conduct a training school for girls' 4-H club leaders Friday, Feb. 16. The meeting Is scheduled to be held in the Community building at JVIalvern. It will start at 10 a. in. and close at 4 p. m. This school is the first of the series of lessons iu home furnishing for 4-H club leaders. They will iu turn conduct training uchoola for members of their clubs, Club leaders are: Mrs. Boy Ponner, Silverette club; Mrs. WarcJ Fickel, Clever Cooks club; A- B. Cumings, Shamrock l&Jtss Helen Buch, Wide Awakes club; Miss Margaret Lln- colu, Busy Beea club; Mrs. Millard Curtis, Clover Leaf club. naval personnel includes 13,500 ncm-cowailHstouea officers a&4 men, of whom 9365 «r» Prussians, and 2675 front eoKtuero or Inland states. Only 890 were originally aea.sm.en. vice president, also a member of the association, will be elected by the board of directors. The vice president will serve on the county allotment committee only in the absence of some other member. Not less than two and not more than four members of the association, in addition to the president, will be elected by the board to constitute the county allotment committee. The president of the board of directors will be chairman of the allotment committee. A secretary and treasurer will be elected by the association's board of directors but neither of these two officers are required to be members of the association. The articles provide that township committees will consist of from three to five members elected by members of the county association within that township. The township committee will have a chairman, a vice chairman and one or more other members. Field supervisors may be appointed to Inspect farms covered by corn-hog contracts and perform other duties assigned by the county allotment committees and the corn-hog section at Washington. Officials of the county association will serve without remuneration aays the articles, with the exception of the secretary, treasurer, members of the county allotment committee, members of township committees, and field supervisors. The latter will be allowed subsistence and expenses up to an amount prescribed by the secretary of agriculture. The power and authority of the association Is vested in the board of directors which is elected by all members of the association. The board will decide appeals of association members from decisions of the county allotment committee: it will authorize expenditures and prepare a budget for county administration expenses. The bulk of the work, however, will be carried out by the county allotment committee. This committee will check all contracts and make recommendations of acceptance to the secretary of agriculture. It will also make whatever adjustments are necessary and certify the final figures which are sent to Washington for approval. The secretary will keep all records of the association, the township committee, and the allotment committee. He will keep these records on file and will furnish information to association members as requested. The treasurer will have custody of all the association's funds. He will be under bond. The duties of the township j committees will be: 1. To obtain contracts. 2. To assist farmers in preparing data required in the contract. 3. To appraise the corn, yield of land offered to be contracted. 4, To check and if necessary correct data offered by producers and landlords. 5. To obtain production data on corn and hogs of non-contract signers. 6. To obtain final signature of contracts after final adjustment of figures. 7. To certify production records In determination of 1332-33 average corn and hog base, township meetings. 8. To niako investigations tracts. The duties of the field super- yiaora will Include visit ing aud Editorial note: The person from whom these thoughts came wandered Into the office one morning after the depar- tnre of the regular conductor of the column, looked around shyly for a moment and was making a rather hurried movement to the door when he was asked what he wanted. -f-t-1- With admirable reticence the a soldier of fortune, a phlloso In short, no less a person than The Corporal himself — although he added that the rank corporal was really merely a Jocular one, since he never admitted a real rank of less than sergeant. Of credentials the gentleman had none, except possibly one might so call the pair of shoes which he proudly claimed had not been cleaned since the Cow War. -f-t-1- Ono of the more unpleasant parts of being a columnist'* fictitious mouthpiece is the base- leas, and usually rather inconsistent, character assigned to oneself by the columnist himself. -f-t-1- It's a little like the position of the radio humorists, who must submit to being thought of as being as silly as the banalities with which he supports his penthouse and automobiles. Only the columnist's character doesn't have a penthouse and automobiles. All he gets is the false reputation. -f-t-1- I don't believe in reform and I wouldn't run a reform organization or a contest for good and worthy deeds for any. thing. About as many people have done well with that sort of thing as have hurt themselves, but it requires a talent for it to succeed. But tlie talent very often would make one a success at selling medicines from an old-time medicine show tent. I'm merely a conservative, and I must admit that I distrust nearly anything which I am told will lead the world to bigger and brighter things, -f-t-1- In times like the past three or four years one learns to love conservative people, no matter how selfish they are, if only they've a large supply of earthy, non-visionary honesty. -f-t-1- When political and economic systems are in tounnoll it's rather pleasant to see houses and trees and streets that are going through no worse changes to the eye's view than the growing need of a coat, of paint, no matter if they aren't ftU very beautiful in an artis, tic sense. Changes, perhaps, but revo. lutiou seems very distant as one looks a t such things, Jt is easier to imagine a revolution as one comfortably and cock- surely interprets for his own satisfaction the meaning of the evening news. Probably the fault of conservatism is not that it fails to borr tempiation of future perfections but that it faila to properly Hve the present, even as do the up- Utters. Probably full enjoyment every day of the present is scarcely »«"!?!? *»fo »".«««»t»wi '«» An ftfcBfte tftx return tttttt ** filed t»y every cftteen of tft* ttnftetf States wftetftw r«rt«a* *t fcoma of Abroad. a*a eterf P*f- goii residing fn the lotted States thongn Sot * Cftfeen whose gross Income for tfte tint- able year 1938 amounted to |6.906, of whose net Income amounted to: <«* |t,<toO If single of tied mti Sot IMng *tth or *tte; (b) $2,600 it married and llt- ing with husband or wife; of (c) More t&*n the personal et- emption If status of taxpayer changed. If an Individual IB tingle and the net Income, Including that of dependent minors, if any, it |i,* 000 of otef, of if the gross Income is $5,000 of oref, a return must be filed, if the combined net income of husband and wife, and dependent minor children, if anf, Is $2,500 of oref t of If their combined gross income is $6,000 of over, alt such income must be band or the Chanticleer club. With alt of Hollywood's inanities, eitravaganzas, and pseudo- sopliisticatlon it may be that Mr. Henry presents better entertainment than any road company which performed at the Opera House. Anil It Is obviously impossible to complain that nowadays people aren't as Interesting as they apparently used to be, for we are ourselves the present generation. It has been said often enough i that one should know, I guess—-| why not reach for the brass ring? One supposes that there is a brass ring in Malvern. , Perhaps, but, too, a conservative would rather rest T like, too, the bitter, utterly caustic cynic. There l» a grip* ping delight about the words of such penooa only like the thrill of poetic sentiment or idealism. One suppose* that the true cynic would distrust both sensations, distrusting his brother cynic as well an the idealist. It is to be supposed, too, that the true poet is Intoxicated both by Idealism and cynicism. Only the indifferent feel both, and forget, a* we do. -f-t-1- But there is some satisfaction for the conservative in that he need never blushingly recall a false prophecy, for he makes none, nor be hurt by the breaking of futile hopes, for he has none. And he's never really sensitive to the degree, of boredom he bring* to others, reported oft ft joint r*tnfa, of separate returns of Jrastwnd and *ffe. tn cat* tfrft Jmst)**a ftatf wife efeet to 6fo «ep*faie f start* and theft «ott%tfr«4 net ft 16,000 et of «*, ttetn shall teak* ft retnrn «n Form 1040. II the net fncotne of a decadent to the 4*t« of hi* d«*tl was $1,000 of o»*f, If ttntoarrted, of fft e*c*ft* of t&e credit atKrtrtd htm by 8«ctlou K (e) »»a (e) et toe ftereane Act of iftlt (edt&pfltsd without regafd to hfc tftattt* *s toe fte*4 of a tamflyh If m«m*d and Ifrfng wfth jsptrarfc, of ft hi* tro** tncott* fof the $«H04 *M $5,000 of oref, toe ciecUtot of admlnlstiratof shall malce * fe- tnfn fof him on Form 1640 of 1040A. Income of (a) estates of Ais&e* dents befofe flfial settlement, (b) trusts, wntthef created ftj- Will of deed, fof unascertained persons of persons with contingent Interests; of income held under the terms of the wftl or trust fof fn- turd 1 distribution, is taxed to the fiduciary as a single person, except that from the income of a decedent's estate there should be deducted any amount properly paid 'of credited to a beneficiary. Chas. O. Huston, Collector of Internal Revenue, Dos Moines, la, Fattfpflftff l*T**d». *ef « f Otte*e4 wttft acctafm tfrfct fatted fof arotrtd Mm to extend eemfcrata- latfoti* and conipttmeat bfm vport hit stand. f&f<mtttotrt thft wee* tfce Cotrfftttte* o* Atffetrftnre ftt tfte ROBS* nat town noiattrg neAffnfft on the proposed a»endi&ent to the Aiffeuttoftk! AdJnStnMnt Act that will ftrlnf cattle trftder the tertn* tfc«reei. t apfemfed In to- naif of tn« ffltasufe and ttfgSd fof the pasMUte el some men bill with the thought fn mind thftt we should b* deretoplM * ph\tt of •tnenltoral fttlef that it unified and eenstttent, It te of the utraott that cattle feedeta be ttudn a th*t they wffl t>* taten elfl **«ef the »ew Irffi. ft tt, ft etfef, the fntentloii of in*«t « ft* wfeft *re *fUBy ce-fteeriifed *n tft» *e1f*fs of tfait gfOT* to cftntfirt* prvtsfag tW *gM fof projKef ttfr otafttoft. fro Dittle t« won «»tH a ttt* ts ftftally on tfre 8t*t«ft* books. W«*W»gte* *a« ih gaift. fttttfl *tMn tW« »e%l to cftleBfftte tn* Wrtfeday of tTesiaent Robsefelt and to «s«1st with the eitdowmeht of Warm Springs Foundation. "Ifait dretB" and "rtfieet »e*f*» turned out to tend a hand with tfce fcffaif while the Eiecntlre pasted hfg 62nd milestone. Feb. t, 1884. Horses and i N Washington By Otha t). Weaftn All week long Congress has pounded away on appropriation bills for the various departments, | a consistent and successful effort 1 being made to keep down the] amounts. ~ ! On Wednesday during the course of routine debate there occurred a dramatic scene when Resident Commissioner Camlio Osias of the Philippine Islands took the floor to plead for the independence of his country under the terms of the bill passed by the 72nd Congress. The Island legislature turned down the measure at its last session with the result that Osias urged an extension of time, as the terms of this bill only provided for a year in which the territory could accept, in order that the people will have a chance to elect another assembly •— perhaps of a different complexion. At the climax of bis speech he stated that be expected to resign bis high position here to return to his country and be a candidate for the state senate, a position that pays $3000, with a view to pressing, for the acceptance of the act th«t*w|illproTide for the eventual ffe«doi»?of the We have a few good teams of Horses and Mules for sale at private sale. Some well matched teams in the lot and also a number of good individuals. These are broke and ready for work. We Guarantee Satisfaction on the horse* we sell or your Money Back. We are always interested in buying good fat chunks weighing from 1400 to 1600 pounds. For.anything in Horses call,us. Caudell Bros. Dead Animals We hftul d«*d Ho*«, Hor««*, C*itle, Sheep lamsey Render ingWk; , best of Malvern social »fe was i» the days ot the Silver Cornet $r9rJn§^r ^WPW PUBLIC SALE As I am moving to a smaller farm I will offer at public sale at my home on the C, F. Davis farm 4i/g miles south of Malvern on ^^9^^^ IH ^Hv w^EBtr ffr^^^^f^ M RH HH Hi^WMi HH^^^^^ ^ff ^B ^HMHM commencing at 12;30 o'clock the following property;196 Head of Livestock 196 '? .6 Head of Horses Team grey geldings, 4 yrs, old, wt, 2900 Well broke and good workers, Grey gelding, 8 yrs, old, wt, — ~»»* Sorrel gelding, smooth mouth, wt, * Bay gelding, smooth mouth, wt* ,^, Black horse mule, smooth mouthi wi 1800 HAY and SEED ( before frost, Some Alfalfa ami gwee* cigyep 30 by. Yellow Pent seed corn, hung 10 Head of Cattle 5 Head Milk Cowe including Jersey cow, 7 yrs, old, Holstein cow, 8 yr&, Mi Bolstein and Jersey mixed, 5 yrs, old! Jersey heifer, 8 yrs, old? Hql&tein Jieite 8 yrs, old, % AU olttee are giving in ilk now and are pasture bred, 2 yr, old, Shorthorn and Jersey -• , one Shorthorn and one > , N- IF YOU SMOKE TOQ YOUU For auick relief from ana upaet stowacb due to excessive smolcing and drinking try Dr. A J< ~ ~ • • • John Deere i ro,w Jiater, tractor " of harrow. w« can do it

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