Redlands Daily Facts from Redlands, California on May 22, 1965 · Page 6
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Redlands Daily Facts from Redlands, California · Page 6

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Redlands, California
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Saturday, May 22, 1965
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Page 6
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OUR ANCESTORS by Quincy PS?— "You and your steel warships! Look, we'll launch one more Monitor and that's iti" Additional Sports 6-Saturday, May 22, 1965 Red lands Daily Facts Ann Landers answers your problems Columbia grid whiz signs Archie Roberts, who set virtually every Ivy League passing record at Columbia, signed a unique three-year contract with the Cleveland Browns Friday and now will await word on whether he can play in exhibition games while studying to be a doctor. The Browns signed Roberts to a contract whicli wiU allow him to study full time for the next two seasons, .ioining the squad for active participation in the 1967 season. Browns President Art Modell said he asked National Football League headquarters for permission for Roberts to play in exhibition games tliis season and next because "I want him to have some contact." Roberts wiU receive S7.000 a year for the next two years and S14,000 wiien he starts active play. The contract, Modell said, was not the "no cut" variety. The Browns will also pay Roberts' hving expenses and tuition while he and his wife, Barbara, attend Western Reserve University here. Jlrs. Roberts is studying to be a gynecologist. Howard leaps 50-1 feet for Valley college San Bernardino Valley College tracksler Robert tlowai'd leaped a tremendous 30-feet. 1-inch in the triple jump yesterday at JGlendale in the finals of the Southern California Junior College track and field champion]ships. But the jump only gained Howard second place in the even., behind Mike Woods of East Los -Angeles who soared 51-4^.i to win. Howard is the defending state champion in the event. This year. Howard had a best of 48-6 before the meet yesterday. Gene Carson, former Redlands high runner, placed jeighth in the two-mile race with a lime of 9:40 and missed the state meet trip. High jumper Walter Brown I qualified for the slate meet at Modesto next Saturday. He was in a nine-way tic for fourth with a jump of 6-4. 12 sprinters battle in Hollypark race L^GLEWOOD (UPI)-A field of 12 sprinters that includes Hill Rise, Native Diver and Viking Spirit battle today in the 7-furlong, 550,000 added Los .Angeles Handicap at Hollywood Park. The event almost certainly will decide the 1965 thoroughbred sprint champion. If all 12 candidates go to the post, the handicap will have a gross value of S56.800, w.-ith the winner collecting $34,300. In Friday's racing. Bill Shoemaker broke one of his worst slumps with a riding triple, including a win aboard Niarkos II in tlie Friday Morning Club Juniors Purse. Terry's Secret won the co- featured Hemophilis Foundation Purse. m Has a MAY 23 Nelson Sembach Guy Pierce E. D, Geaslin Stephen Strandberg Par Cordoia Larry Munz James Barnard Daniel Zaieha Eimo Gehrig John W. Tucker R. G. Elphic William Van Vacter Larry M. Mum Paul Teas Patrick Spangler MAY 24 — Michael A. Garcia Willard Green Dr. David Hill Robert raucker Maj. M. A. McNamee John Parrott James E. Cram John T. Powell Craig West Ray Barron Jr. Lionel Gentry Andrew G. Hall Frank Howell Manual Guerrero Mark Hebert Jim Angus Mike Simms Kurt Knoblock Louis Engle Mark Brown Nelson Messinger Jr. Happy Birthday from 11 E. State Pti. PY 3-2505 Miguel leads Martini golf BIRMINGHAM. England fUPI)—.Angel Miguel of Spain carried a three-stroke lead today into the third round of the SI6,S00 Martini golf tournament. .Miguel carded a four - under par 68 Friday for a two - day total of 135. Top prospect NIAGARA FALLS. N.Y. (UPI)—Jim Maloney. new head basketball coach at Niagara University, said Friday that Bill Smith, who played al Trenton (N.J.) Junior College the last two seasons, would enroll here in the fall. Smith scored 1,181 points at Trenton. To get trophy NEW YORK (UPI) — Three- time Olympic discus gold med­ alist Al Oerter will receive the Helms World Trophy for his contribution to athletics at the New York Athletic Club's annual spring track and field meet on June 3. Dempsey gets post NEW YORK (UPI) - Jack Dempsey has been named siwrts committee chairman for the City of Hope's June 13 "Man of the Year" dinner honoring Irving Bollncr, former .\cw York University basketball player now an executive with Revion. Ann Landers: We are not calling you Dear .\nn Landers because we don't think you are dear. We think you are just rotten. This letter is being written by thi-ee 12-year-old women who will never read your crummy column again as long as we live. Your advice to the mother who wrote and asked if her 13-year-old daughter should be allowed to go to a dance with a 16-year-old boy has made you a lot of enemies. Don't you know that some 13- year-old girls are very mature and have a lot of sense? Age i.sn't everything. My cousin is 16 years old and she has been in trouble w.'ith a boy already. I know better than THAT and I w'on't be 13 until July. We think you should get your brains out of mothballs and catch up with 1965 activities or turn your job over to a person who is living in this century. And just in case you think we are cheap, hoody girls we would like you to know that we are all refined young ladies who come from very rich families. — EX- Readers Dear Refined Ladies From Rich Families: Since you are no longer reading the column I don't expect you to see this, but perhaps someone will tell you about it. I want to thank you for the ladylike manner in which you expressed yourselves. I could tell from the very first sentence that you girls were the last word in refinement. The advice stands. Dear Ann Landers: I am a widow 47 years old. Four months ago I answered an ad in t h e newspaper and found heaven. I am now the housekeeper for a widower and his three children. The youngest is under school age and the oldest is 13. I love these children with all my heart and I'm sure they feel the same about me. In all my life I have never felt so needed and so appreciated. The problem is this: I'm afraid I may be falling in love with their father. I've had an opportunity to observe him under a variety of circumstances and he is the most wonderful man I've ever known. Mr. X is two years younger than I am. He treats me with respect and kindness, but I see no sign that his feelings will ever go beyond that. Should I stay here and risik being hurt or should I leave and try to get over this? The man is invited out often but refuses to be "dated up." I need your clear-eyed advice. — NEVER THOUGHT IT COULD HAPPEN Dear Never Thought: Accept the realities and make a social life unrelated to your employer. If you leave this home you might deprive yourself of the most rewarding years of your life. Stay — for the children's sake as w^eU as your own. Dear .Ann Landers: Since lots of people write to you about whatever is on their minds I think I wiU do the same. I am 13 years old now. When^ I was younger I used to losej things all the time and I was always looking for something. My grandmother, who was a very wise woman, said to me, "I'll bet you'll find it in the very last place that you look." She was right. I'd look everywhere and then in the very last place I looked there it was. Can you explain why it always happens that way? I have tried many times to figure out the an­ swer.—FOOKIE Dear Pookie: When you find what you are looking for you stop looking. So — the place you found it w^as the last place you looked. If excessive drinking is wrecking your health or destroying someone you love, send for ANN LANDERS' booklet, "Help For The Alcoholic," enclosing with your request 20 cents in coin and a long, self-addressed, stamped envelope. Ann Landers will be glad to help you with your problems. Send them to her in care of Redlands Daily Facts, enclosing a stamped, self-addressed envelope. Copyright, 1965, Publishers Newspaper Syndicate. Both parties take new look at south By Doris Fleeson SELL IT TOMORROW With low - cost Classified .Ads WASHINGTON — Both the Johnson Administration and national Republican leadership today accept as a fact of life the two-party South, v.-ith the Southern Negro steadily increasing his .share of its total vote. The Administration has warned Southern Democrats to jet with it or they wiU find themselves losing rapidly to Republican competition for local and state offices. National chairman John Bailey delivered the message in Atlanta, the largest metropolitan area in the South. In the old Sam Rayburn phrase. Bailey put the situation to his Southern associates with the bark off. The Republican threat, he said, obUges them to turn from their highly personalized pontics to party organization, and it will not be easy (or them. Such a challenge to the Southern barons of the Democratic party is a new departure, even from the recent past. Many of them are still Congressional 'committee chairmen, but they have been enfeebled by time. CAKNrV'AJL By Dick Turner mmmmi X i»»s h va. r,c Tu. t^. vi ta. o(f. "It's easy to tell that you're a rewfywed, MrSi Perkins. All that stuff has to be cookedl" chance and the exertions of a desperate minority operating now even within the confmes of their own protectorates. Civil rights advocates did not expect all their present victories m the voting rights legislation nor the demoralization of the once in\dncible Southern opposition. With the old walls crumbling, the national parties are taking bolder steps to insure their own fortunes. For Republicans, Sen. Thruston Morton of Kentucky, chairman of the G.O.P. Senate Campaign Committee and former national chairman, wiU follow Bailey shortly to Atlanta with a similar practical approach. He sees both parties as firmly committed to the right to vote and equality of opportunity for the Negro. He will tell Southern Republicans that they, too, must! build on that condition. j l\Iorton makes the interesting point that every Southern and [ border state has been carried | by at least one of the Repub-j lican candidates for President | since 1952 except Arkansas andj North Carolina. (North CaroUna did defect to President Hoover in 1928.) j President Eisenhower carried [ seven of this group in 1952, ninei in 1956. Nixon repeated in five! of them. Except for Louisiana,! which Eisenhower carried inj 1956. Sen. Barry Goldwaterj failed to repeat the Eisenhower-. Nixon Southern victories but' penetrated the Deep South with, Georgia, .Alabama, Mississippii and South Carolina. | Morton inclines to the view that Republican progress is more dependable outside the Deep South except for Georgia.! One reason he is going there! is that this fall the state will' elect the entire lower house of its legislature. Georgia Republicans wiU contest 49 of the 141 seats at stake. Of the 49, 28 are in the Atlanta metropolitan area. The common sense of the Morton reasoning on how to advance his party in the state is obvious. At present it holds only seven seats of the lower house and nine in the State Senate. It is hardly necessary to add that President Johnson, surprised and annoyed by Georgia's defection last year, is watching the same election and that Bailey didn't just happen to be in AUanta. (Copyright, 1965, by United Features Syndicate, Inc.) TEEN-AGERS If you're looking for A Summer Job — Your Hometown Newspaper, The Facts, will help you find • • • FREE! On Wednesday, June 9 and Wednesday, June 16, The FACTS will publish without charge your "Job Wanted" Ad . • . Maximum of 4 lines and only I ad per person. You must bring your Ad to The FACTS office by 5 P.M. Friday, June 4 USE THIS FORM TO WRITE YOUR Redlands Daily Facts Teen-Age Summer "Job Wanted" Ads Please insert ad as follows: (1) (2) (3) (4) (S) («) (7) (8) (?) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14) (15) (li) (17) (18) m Do not write here. (NOT OVER 19 WORDS) (DO NOT ABBREVIATE) To Assure Accuracy, Print Plainly — One Word to Each of the Above Lines — Including Your Address and/or Telephone, and Name If Desired For FACTS Reference: Your Name Address Ph one

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