Panama City News-Herald from Panama City, Florida on June 30, 1974 · Page 71
Get access to this page with a Free Trial

Panama City News-Herald from Panama City, Florida · Page 71

Publication:
Location:
Panama City, Florida
Issue Date:
Sunday, June 30, 1974
Page:
Page 71
Start Free Trial
Cancel

Want to ask a famous parson a question? Sand the question M a postcard, to "Atk," Family Weekly, 641 Lexington Ave., New York, N.Y. 10O22. Wall pay $5 for publlahad quoatlona. Sorry, we can't answer othara. FOR SEN. LOWELL WEWKER, JR. (R. Conn.) From what I read, the Republican party doesn't have a chance in the 1974 elections. How do you feel about this?-Doug Wataon, Niagara Folk, Ont. • I think 1974 will bo a rough year on the incumbents of both parties. Voters will be examining the candidates more closely than ever before, and the old partisan political rhetoric Won't be enough to get reelected. It will be a person . rather than a party year. But if we Republicans put forward candidates who stand for integrity in government and address the issues in a positive way, then 1 believe we can make gains this fall. , FOR LORNE GREENE Is it true that you are the second richest actor in Hollywood? —M. Robbing, Lancaster, Pa. • I am not even in the first 50 or 100 or 200. Most people who arc really wealthy today are in real estate and oil—they aren't wage earners like actors. I think the ones who have really made it, did so a long time ago-before taxes went as "High as they have. By the way, wno is the richest actor? [Editor's note: Bob Hope.] FOR BILLIE JEAN KING Did you have any tennis idols when you were learning to play?—Gwen Ahlefeld, Bucyrus, Ohio • I had no idol, but I had a goal ever, since I was 11 years old and couldn't get into a tennis picture because I didn't have a tennis dress. I thought tennis was a game only for the rich. I wanted to change the game. My victory over Bobby Riggs was the end of a long Phase One of my career—19 years of competition. FOR CLOR1S LEACHMAN Do you believe that because you've won an Academy Award, you are in a better position to accept or reject parts? —B. Herman, Washington, D.C. • I don't think I am in any position to make a choice. Today, with so little work available, actors don't turn down parts unless they are pretty terrible. Besides, if one takes oneself too seriously, there's a chance one could turn down an important part, and after a while, parts simply wouldn't be offered. FOR RICKY SEGALL of "The Partridge Famihj" You've been compared to Shirley Temple. How do you feel about that?—T. Andrews, San Antonio, Texas' • Who's Shirley Temple? FOR GARY PLAYER, jnofessional golfer Many sportswriters say that golfers aren't athletes. How do you react to this?—John Lang, Canton, Ohio • I know I'm an athlete. Give me a year to concentrate on tennis, and I feel sure I would be a world class player. FOR LORETTA SWIT, costar of "M'A'S'U" How can you stand constantly wearing a wardrobe of combat fatigues on "M*A*S'H"?-Mary Schuman, Gary, Ind. • I love itl I think fatigues arc cute. I think clothes arc about as important us your name—and what's in a name? FOR MARLIN PERKINS of TV's "Wild Kingdom" Why, when you talk about saving animals, do you have a zebra skin on your wall?—Mia Neucnhoff, Hyattsville, Md. • The zebra skin seen on the back wall of my den on some of our programs was from an animal who died in the zoo. In the last few years, we eliminated the skins of animals from my den l>ecnusc too many people assumed that I had killed these animals in the wild. Nothing coidd be further from the truth. I urn not a hunter. FOR LLOYD BUCHER, former commander of the "U.S.S. Pueblo" What is your stand on amnesty for Vietnam war draft dodgers and deserters?—John Mulligan, Austin, Texas • I believe draft dodgers—those who fled this country rather than fight in an undeclared war or in a war they considered immoral—should be permitted to return home without further penalty. Not so deserters. I think the courts must decide on the merits of their individual desertions. Those men were fulfilling a sworn contract before they deserted. Blanket amnesty without trial is not appropriate for them. FOR THE ASK THEM YOURSELF EDITOR "*T)id Barbra Streisand ever do that Ingmar Bergman film she was supposed to make and, if so, when can we sec it?—G. Roberts, Albany, Ga. • Barbra is slated to l>c in the movie version of "The Merry Widow," to be produced by Dino do Laurentiis in Sweden. However, although the film was budgeted at $6,500,000, inflation has been out of control in that country—to the point where further financing is necessary, and the production has been delayed. The Dc Laurentiis office in New York insists that the Streisand-Bergman musical has not been abandoned, and it will go ahead when the economic situation resolves itself. June 30,1974 faitllty^^XUfy The Newspaper Magazine ***s»*K> MORTON FRANK, President and Publisher PATRICK M. LINSKEY, V.P.-Ad Director Md Layefaky, Marketing Dir.; Gerald S. Wroa, Eastern Mgr.; Robert D. Olick, Associate Eastern Mgr.; Joe Fraiar, Jr., Chicago Mgr.; Joseph Kelly, Detroit Mgr. PUBLISHER RELATIONS: ROBERT D. CARNEY and LEE ELLIS, V.P.'s and Co-Directors; Robert H. Marriott, Mgr.; Robert J. Christian PUBLISHER SERVICES; Robert Banker, Promotion; Caryl Eller, Merchandising; Loula Laraia, Distribution. LEONARD 8. OA VI DOW, Chairman MORT PERSKV, V.P.-Editor-in-Chief Reynolds Dodaon, Managing Editor Richard VaMati, Art Director RoMlyn Abrevaya, Women's Editor Marilyn Hansen, Food Editor Joan Henrlcksen, Pamela Howard < and Hal London, Associate Editors; Estelle Walpln, Art Asst.; Gloria Brier, Pictures. Contributing Editors: Peer J. Oppenhelmer, Hollywood; Larry Bortsleln, Sports. PRODUCTION: Melbourne Zipprich, Director; Richard Wendt, Mgr.; Roberta Collins, Makeup. Headquarters: 641 Lexington Ave., N.Y., N.Y. 10022 m 1974 FAMILY WEEKLY, INC. All rights reserved. A publication of Downe Communications, Inc. Edward R. Down*, Jr., Chief Enecullve Ollicer Roland S. Trwnbla, President Cover Photo by Normand Menard

What members have found on this page

Get access to Newspapers.com

  • The largest online newspaper archive
  • 11,100+ newspapers from the 1700s–2000s
  • Millions of additional pages added every month

Try it free